Wisconsin Trophy Hunters Slaughter 91 Wolves in 5 days, Go Over Limit In Two Zones

UPDATE: October 21, 2014

The numbers changed today on the DNR 2014 “wolf harvest”. It’s now 92 wolves dead but the numbers have moved around on the chart.  Hmmmm. Notice there is one less dead wolf in Zone 1, where trophy hunters went over the legal limit. Yesterday the number  of wolves killed in that zone was 37, now it’s 36. So one dead wolf was moved from Zone 1 and added to Zone 3.  Also notice that it says “Zones will close when quotas are reached”. So how did they allow so many wolves to die above the legal limit?  It’s bad enough there is a hunt at all but hunters in Zone 2 killed FOURTEEN more wolves than they were supposed to. And in Zone 1 they killed 5 wolves, now it’s been changed to 4, over the legal limit. That’s 18 dead wolves who shouldn’t be dead. This is outrageous!!

I hate that I have to look at this chart. I hate that I have to ask about dead wolf numbers. I hate I used the word “harvest”, if only to describe what’s on the chart.

Have wolf advocates been reduced to counting dead wolves? It’s so incredibly maddening.

Wisconsin 2014 DNR

===
Wisconsin Wolf Slaughter

Wisconsin DNR Wolf “Harvest”

It’s bad enough 91 wolves have been slaughtered in Wisconsin since October 15 (just five days) but notice Wisconsin trophy hunters are going over  legal limits of killing wolves. In Zone 1 by 5 wolves and in Zone 2 by 14 wolves. Is the DNR ignoring what amounts to poaching of wolves by not monitoring the hunt closely and letting hunters kill wolves with impunity?

Please flood their lines and ask why hunters have been allowed to go over the legal hunting limit in Zone 2 by 14 wolves and Zone 1 by 5 wolves. Do they care?

===

Governor Scott Walker

(608)266-1212

===

Wisconsin DNR

Call Center Staff Available 7 Days a Week (7 a.m.-10 p.m.)

General Information 1-888-WDNRINFo | (1-888-936-7463) | Hours: 7 a.m. – 10 p.m.
101 S. Webster Street . PO Box 7921 . Madison, Wisconsin 53707-7921 . 608-266-2621

===

This picture out of the Wisconsin killing fields has been making the rounds on the internet.  This is just one of the 85 wolves reported killed since last Wednesday.

“This picture out of the Wisconsin killing fields has been making the rounds on the internet. This is just one of the 85  91 wolves reported killed since last Wednesday. Source unknown and used under “Fair Use.”  (From Our Wisconsin, Our Wildlife)”

===

Seems like Wisconsin trophy hunters are well on their way to beating the 2013 over-limit:

UPDATE: Wis. wolf season ends with 6 extra wolves killed

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin wolf hunters and trappers went slightly over the quota this season.

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources said Thursday the 2013 season ended with 257 wolves harvested. That’s six animals over the 251-wolf limit.

http://www.nbc15.com/news/state/headlines/Wis-wolf-hunt-gets-underway-227838411.html

===

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Wisconsin Wolves, gray wolves

Top Photos: Wisconsin DNR

Bottom Photo: Courtesy Our Wisconsin, Our Wildlife

Tags: Wolf killing frenzy, Wisconsin, wolf slaughter, State should be ashamed, wolves suffering, contact the Wisconsin DNR, over-limit in 2013 as well

Wisconsin Trophy Hunters Wipe Out 65 Wolves In Just 4 Days..

Wisconsin wolf public domain

Deja’ Vu – Slaughtered Wisconsin Wolf – 1909 – What’s different today?

October 18, 2014

There’s a wolf killing frenzy going on in Wisconsin. In just four days Wisconsin trophy hunters have slaughtered 65 wolves, that’s over 16 wolves per day. Wolves are being tracked and trailed by up to 6 dogs per hunter and I don’t believe for one second that some of those wolves haven’t been directly killed by dogs or at the very least bitten multiple times before they’re killed by the hunters. Can you imagine the terror wolves face as their chased by barking dogs and hunters?

Besides legalized dog/wolf fighting,Wisconsin allows wolves to be trapped, arrowed, shot and baited. And they’re killing wolf puppies, who are barely eight months old. Trophy hunting is sick and anyone who engages in it needs their heads examined.

The Badger state trophy hunters are acting like barbarians, this is nothing but blood lust and hatred toward an animal who’s been persecuted for hundreds of years in this country. Shame on the Obama Administration for allowing  USFWS to delist Great Lakes wolves. They’ve turned wolves over to their greatest enemies, fish and game agencies.

IMO Ted Nugent was obviously encouraging poaching of Wisconsin wolves when he  posted this on his Facebook page on October 17, 2014.

“WISCONSIN Spirit BloodBrothers the Weisner family trapped this stunning wolf. Though no state has issued an adeqaute number of wolf tags, believe when I tell you that certain WE THE PEOPLE in touch caring Americans are killing MANY MANY more wolves than the numbnut corrupt dishonest PC government thugs allow. Kill as many as you can real conservationists. The wolf population is irresponsibly & dangerously out of control. Wolf jackets ROCK!!”

Is Wisconsin DNR investigating Nugent’s outrageous comment? I doubt it, they’re too busy sucking up to their customers, the hunters.

BOYCOTT WISCONSIN!

Don’t buy their cheese or any products they sell. Don’t visit or take vacations there. The only way to send a message to the state is to hit them in their pocketbook. Maybe they’ll reconsider their disgusting “dog fighting” wolf hunt.

===

Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Why is the DNR destroying our wolves?

October 12, 2014 4:30 am  • 

“My favorite recipe for wolf is to skin it, piss on it and let it rot for the maggots. Then cash in the hide and watch people like you squirt a tear over it.” — Dwayne Glosemeyer, Wisconsin Wolf Hunt Facebook page 

Dwayne Glosemeyer’s in-your-face arrogance flinging torture and disrespect for wolves at wolf advocates mirrors the hatred of wolves promoted by the Department of Natural Resources. The DNR has a flagrant disregard for science, nature, and the majority of citizens in Wisconsin.

Paul Paquet is a world-renowned Canadian biologist who has been studying wolves for over four decades. He is on the advisory/science and recovery board of the Living with Wolves organization started by Jim and Jamie Dutcher after they lived with and filmed the Sawtooth Pack for six years. The organization’s goal is to stop the slaughter of wolves. Jane Goodall and Robert Redford are on the honorary board. I heard Paquet speak passionately against hunting wolves, as a moral issue, at the International Wolf Symposium last October in Duluth, Minn. He co-signed the letter sent by UW-Madison’s Adrian Treves recommending suspension of the 2014 Wisconsin wolf hunt.

READ MORE:

http://host.madison.com/news/opinion/column/patricia-randolph-s-madravenspeak-why-is-the-dnr-destroying-our/article_f47037c0-845d-57e8-8a01-923ea29bad48.html

===

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Wisconsin wolves, gray wolves

Tags: brutality, barbarism, 65 wolves slaughtered in 4 days, Wisconsin DNR,  Ted Nugent encourages poaching of wolves?, wolves suffering, Patricia Randolph, Madravenspeak

Anti-Wolf Comments Demonstrate Ignorance and Hysteria Wolves Face….

Wolf paranoia Rational Wiki
A typical wolf about to take your children and eat your job!

It’s been awhile since I cleaned out my spam folder and deleted anti-wolf comments. This is just a small sampling, I could write an entire book on these little gems. They’d be laughable if it wasn’t so serious for wolves. They show the mentality wolves are facing and demonstrate once again why wolves need protection under the ESA.

===

Wolf Hysteria

“Wolf hysteria (also known as wolf persecution, or rarely, lupophobia) is the widespread public hatred of wolves, incorporating both their enduring role as folk devils, and societal attitudes favouring policies of active persecution of wolves, and opposition and resistance to policies aiming to protect existing wild populations, or reintroduce the species into former ranges where it has become extinct relatively recently. The phenomenon shares much in common with moral panics, including the use of scaremongering, unverifiable anecdotes, demonisation, exaggeration, moral high roading etc., to the extent the phenomenon could be considered a moral panic in and of itself, though it is not commonly referred to as such”…Rational Wiki

REAED MORE : http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Wolf_hysteria

===

Idaho bone pickers
Submitted on 2014/10/08 at 7:57 pm
I’ve killed 4, all pups. You all have killed unborn children with your voting skills. Try to not be so hypocritical. You do your thing, we will do ours. Geographical differences are human nature now leave us the fuck alone. Got my 2014 tag ready for this Friday:)
===
joe
Submitted on 2014/08/10 at 7:42 pm | In reply to meirad.
I cant wait for this wolf season, so I can get revenge for all the damn wolfs eating my elk!!!!!
===
Doug
Submitted on 2014/07/02 at 12:03 am | In reply to nina clausen.
Get your. Head out of the fog and spend a little time in the forests of montana. We have oodles of wolves. I have one of the hog heaven pack myself. Another pack already is in the region once occupied by them,,, less than two years later.
===
This comment is  particularly ridiculous since there have been just two controversial wolf/human fatalities in the last 100 years but domestic dogs kill on average 30 people per year and bite millions more. I’m a dog lover but those are the facts. Deer are more dangerous to humans than wolves. Comments like the one below demonstrate the hysteria surrounding wolves. Wolf haters are either sadly misinformed or blindly repeating anti wolf talking points, without having a clue what they’re talking about. 

cheri kessler
Submitted on 2014/06/11 at 10:27 am
I’m sorry but many of these posts seem a little ridiculous. Wolves are dangerous predators who attack people and will hunt people- including children. They produce large numbers of offspring in a relatively quick amount of time, and they are an alpha predator with nothing to keep them in check. They are not going extinct and are actually becoming quite dangerous because of their large numbers even in northern Colorado. Saying they are more scared of us seems pretty false to me since they are in large packs and weigh around 100 pound each vs 1 person— I know I wouldn’t be scared of much, plus they become accustomed to being around people and get less wary, taking more risks Again, they are a wild animal and if it means living or dying, they will attack you to survive, or your ranch animals which you might rely on financially. There is a reason why in Idaho and Montana they have open season to hunt- to keep the population numbers down and in check, not to just keep killing them needlessly. Just like all other animals with a hunting season, it is to help keep the population healthy.

They are quite beautiful but don’t be fooled, they are also quite dangerous.

And to say anything about killing baby’s—my goodness, really? You would rather have a wolf live and have a child die? That’s disgusting–they are animals–and animals are definitely below my children and any child, and I would hope you feel the same. Not that only your children matter but all children. Children are unable to protect themselves, literally, especially babies–leave them out of this.
===
Jim Duggins
Submitted on 2014/06/01 at 8:37 pm | In reply to Marilyn Glasgow.
“Knuckledraggers”. I like how you stereotype everyone in Idaho. All you tree hugging queers will make your wish come true. You won’t be able to reproduce, so the earth will go back to the animals because YOU have destroyed the human species. Gay wad.
===
Wolf Killer
Submitted on 2014/05/22 at 7:34 pm
You people are sick. Do you realize that wolves are killing just about every deer, moose, and elk in their area? Not to mention the cattle and sheep they kill. Drive thru Yellowstone and you can count on one hand the number of elk still in the park ..no thanks to these predators. Wolves need to be managed just as much as the rest of the wildlife. What’s wrong with you? Ever seen a deer get eaten by a pack of wolves? It’s not pretty. The deer is usually still alive as it’s back end is eaten. But I guess you have no “feelings” for the animals these wolves kill. Misinformed self righteous idiots.
===
Animals are tasty
Submitted on 2014/05/15 at 12:27 pm | In reply to Bonnie Browm.
GO kill yourself you piece of shit!
===
Tony
Submitted on 2014/04/28 at 10:29 am
Letting one species stay protected while others are regulated is assanine. These wolves are slowly decimating the wildlife that is hunted by humans already. There must be a system of balance which will require a wolf season. I am not saying kill all the wolves, but keep them from eating themselves out of food.
===
J pancheri
Submitted on 2014/04/21 at 4:36 pm | In reply to Kathy Vile.
Yes since wolves show so much mercy on the things they munch on we need more wolve predators like grizzlies and wolverines rippin there guts out and there unborn young.
===
joe
Submitted on 2014/03/20 at 7:07 pm | In reply to orionsbeltwolf.
dont you think they would be better off in central park and LA where they would do more good and you can keep them safe
===
ggggg
Submitted on 2014/03/12 at 12:49 pm
Kill them all, fuck all of you
===
Jim
Submitted on 2014/03/11 at 4:10 pm
There is a reason Wolves were exterminated. They kill everything, that is what they do and they do it well. Living in Alaska and Wyoming I have seen them decimate the Caribou herds and Sheep and Cattle. They have really terrorized the Elk populations in Idaho. The only places big enough and wild enough to support them are Canada and Alaska. I agree it is romantic to see them in the wild but there is not enough room in the lower 48 for them and agriculture. If you made your living raising livestock you would have a different view. I’m sure someone who makes their living sitting in a cubicle will spout off here.
===

mark

Submitted on 2014/03/03 at 5:36 pm | In reply to AGNES DELANIS.
Hello, I have no interest in trying to chang anyones mind but would like to offer an alternate opinon.I understand how some could get a distorted picture of the wolf situationbut i must ask myself how many of the wolf advocates or supporters have actually been in the wild for any length of time both pre and then post wolf. The problem is that wolves, unlike man is totally opportunistic and none selective, they inhabit an area( many square miles) until it is practically devoid of game and them move on and repeat. I also doubt that any of you have seen a large wolf pack corner a small heard of elk in deep snow and kill them all ,eat the noses and a little meat then move on leaving the rest to rot or for scavengers. I wont go into detail but watcthing a wolf pack make a kill is anything but humane. If anyone has the guts and respect to engage in a true honest dialogue regarding this i would welcome your response. I love all animals and being in the wilderness no less than anyone alive, and i consider myself qualified to make honest and unbiased observations. wolves are not being eradicated, only managed,unfortunatly to do that some must be culled. Remember ,if we truly revert to natural selection then only the strong survive,you want that in the human world to?
===
Charles
Submitted on 2014/02/17 at 3:27 pm
Wolves need to be extermited in the lower 48 states. Not one alive!
===
Anna
Submitted on 2014/02/04 at 7:21 pm
I love wolves! I love dogs and I love animals and amen I hate seeing them killed and hunted. It makes me really sad, but we have to look at it from both sides. the wolves are eating the bison and elk calves and are lowering the levels of those animals. sure its not that bad because the elk where getting overpopulated but now they are practically extinct from the park! the wolves are growing into too big amount Also when the elk and bison go extinct because they will be eaten by wolves too often, the wolves will eventually decrease in number because they wont have any prey. and it wouldn’t be a good idea to remove them from the park because it would effect the animals way of life so I think it would either be wise to hunt few of them or take some out of the park to different parts of the US.
===
Stu Markell
Submitted on 2014/01/16 at 8:27 pm | In reply to Darren Thomassie.
Good we don’t want your punk Aziz wolf scat eaters here.
===
fee spirit
Submitted on 2014/01/09 at 6:48 pm
I will shoot and kill any wolf that come into my site.

===
Bill
Submitted on 2013/11/03 at 6:33 pm
Trappers are VITAL in controlling the predation on other animals. Just like every animal, They need to be managed.

===

HAHA you guys are so brainwashed into believing anything some citiot would has never held a rifle in his hand or seen a dirt road before has to say about northern Minnesota and what farmers want to do with their land. Really you can think what you want to think and talk about how wolf hunting is inhumane but what you don’t realize is that farmers that are making an honest living raising and selling cattle are losing more and more cattle every year because of huge wolf populations in certain areas. “Murdering wolves”? Seriously you believe that the DNR only has a hunt so that people can Murder wolves? Oh you are so terribly wrong and mistaken. People who live in the city should have no say in what rural people want to do with their land and I am more than happy to take care of some of them wolves for those farmers. And by the way, wolf furs are going for around 800 dollars right now! Cant wait for the December late season! I’ll post a couple pictures of my trophies.

===

I think we should capture and release 200 of these snugly little guys and release them in Edina. It would be really neat to see them thrive in that environment.

NatureColdWarriors_3wolves

Top Photo: Courtesy Rational Wiki

Bottom Photo: Courtesy Nature Cold Warriors

Posted in: Wolf Wars, gray wolf

Tags: wolf hysteria, moral panic, scaremongering, unverifiable anecdotes, demonization, exaggeration, moral high-roading, Rational Wiki, wolf persecution, anti wolf comments, wolf hatred, ridiculous comments, stupidity

It’s Official: Wolves Are Protected In California!

OR7

OR7  – dual citizen of California and Oregon (:

October 9, 2014

Even though, officially, there are no known gray wolves in California, the state extended endangered species protection to canis lupus today. This is critically important, since the USFWS plans to rubber stamp a national wolf delisting plan, removing all federal protections for wolves in the lower 48. Without state protections, wolves across the country will face tremendous risk.

Gray wolves are subjected to persecution in Montana, Idaho, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, even Washington and Oregon, where they remain listed. Wyoming wolves, until recently, could be shot on sight in 80% of the state. Last week, US District Judge Amy Berman Jackson,  placed Wyoming wolves  back on the Endangered Species List. Her ruling was the result of a lawsuit challenging the state’s faulty “wolf management” plan, specifically the predator zone, where wolves could be killed by any means, 365 days of the year, seven days a week. Mexican gray wolves face an uphill battle on a daily basis, as their tiny, inbred numbers struggle to survive, surrounded by thousands of cattle in the Blue Range Wolf Recovery area and hostile ranchers.

Now that wolves are protected in California they can safely disperse from other states, as the iconic Oregon wolf OR7 did ( so named because he was the seventh wolf to be collared in Oregon.) OR7 made history when he set paws on California soil in December 2011, the first wolf to officially do so since the 1920’s, when canis lupus was eradicated from the Golden State, almost ninety years ago.

OR7 dispersed from the Imnahas, his natal pack in Eastern Oregon. OR7’s mother is famous in her own right. Swimming the Snake River from Idaho into Oregon in 2008, B-300 and her mate became Oregon’s first breeding pair in almost sixty years. Her son went on to become even more famous and provided the impetus for the protection of gray wolves in California.

OR7’s Mother B-300 (Sophie) making her way into NE Oregon 2008

===

ODFW caught the ten member Imnaha wolf pack walking single file through the eastern Oregon woods with at least six pups!! Leading the pack is alpha female B-300. OR7 was born in April  2009, so he’s somewhere in this video. Where’s Waldo? 

OR7 logged thousands of miles on his tracking collar, as he searched for a mate. His arrival in California set off an international sensation. OR7, also known as Journey, moved back and forth between California and Oregon, before finding a mate and settling down in Oregon, now with pups in tow.  If it wasn’t for this amazing wolf it’s unlikely wolves would now be protected in California. It was OR7’s presence in a state long devoid of two of its top predators, the grizzly bear and wolf, that sparked the conversation leading to California’s  decision to right the wrong of almost a century ago. Thank you California. Now lets work on returning your state animal, the grizzly bear, to its native home.

OR7 Pup

One of OR7’s Pups ( ODFW 2014)

===

California Fish and Game Commission ratifies gray wolf findings

The California Fish and Game Commission held a meeting in Mount Shasta on Wednesday, drawing a crowd for its decision to ratify findings supporting the listing of the gray wolf as an endangered species in California.

By David Smith
@SDNDavidSmith
Posted Oct. 9, 2014 @ 9:57 am

http://www.siskiyoudaily.com/article/20141009/NEWS/141009745/-1/news

Alpha male Imnaha pack

Alpha male Imnaha Pack 2011

===

Top Photo: Courtesy Wiki

Middle Photo: Courtesy ODFW

Bottom Photo: Courtesy ODFW

Top Video: Courtesy YouTube ORWild

Bottom Video: Courtesy YouTube ODFW

Posted in: Wolf Wars, California wolves

Tags: California wolves, Oregon wolves, OR7, B-300, Imnaha pack, California Fish and Wildlife, California lists gray wolves, ODFW

Of Wolves and Men…….

black wolf nexus wallpaper

October 7, 2014

This was one of my first posts. It traces the origins of wolf hatred and persecution. Wolves have suffered greatly at the hands of man.

===

September 29, 2009

Nature Magazine examines reasons behind wolf hatred and the systematic campaign to remove them from the lower forty-eight. It merits repeating that for thousands of years Native Americans were able to live with wolves and bears, while settlers saw them as a threat. Even the famed naturalist James Audubon partook in torturing wolves, which was particularly shocking to learn.

As noted in Michael Robinson’s “Predatory Bureaucracy: The Extermination of Wolves and the Transformation of the West”, the federal government became the wolf killing arm for the livestock industry.

By understanding the roots of wolf prejudice it’s clear to see why wolves have been demonized in American culture. The wolf has paid dearly for these attitudes. Even though the same outdated beliefs exist today, we are moving forward to a clearer understanding of the important role predators play in maintaining healthy ecosystems.

Man cannot continue to play god, deciding which animals are good or bad. Predators do not have ulterior motives, they hunt because that is what they are born to do and by so doing contribute to the health and stamina of their prey.

The nexus of wolf wars is the continuing presence of livestock on the Western range. This has been and will continue to be the reason wolves remain caught in the crossfire.

===

From Nature Online:

The Wolf That Changed America
Wolf Wars: America’s Campaign to Eradicate the Wolf

 Wolves have been feared, hated, and persecuted for hundreds of years in North America. Before the arrival of Europeans, Native Americans incorporated wolves into their legends and rituals, portraying them as ferocious warriors in some traditions and thieving spirits in others. European Americans, however, simply despised wolves. Many, including celebrated painter and naturalist John James Audubon, believed wolves ought to be eradicated for the threat they posed to valuable livestock. This attitude enabled a centuries-long extermination campaign that nearly wiped out the gray wolf in the continental United States by 1950.

Origins of Wolf Hatred

In the New World, two top predators – wolves and men – that otherwise would have avoided each other clashed over livestock. In Vicious: Wolves and Men in America, Jon T. Coleman writes:

Wolves had a ghostly presence in colonial landscapes. Settlers heard howls, but they rarely spotted their serenaders. The fearsome beasts avoided humans. People frightened them, and colonists knew this: “They are fearefull Curres,” reported Thomas Morton in 1637, “and will runne away from a man (that meeteth them by chance at a banke end) as fast as any fearefull dogge.”

Because humans and wolves frightened one another, they logically avoided confrontation, opening space between the species. But that space closed when European colonists brought horses, cattle, sheep and pigs with them over the perilous journey across the Atlantic. Without these animals – sources of food and transportation for the European settlers – the colonies would have failed. But because most early colonial communities were small, livestock often grazed on the periphery of the settlements with little protection. Their pastures abutted and bled into the wild, exposing the animals to hungry wolves in search of prey. Wolves quickly learned that docile cattle and sheep made easy meals. Suddenly, colonists found their livelihoods in danger, and they lashed out at wolves, both with physical violence and folklore that ensured wolf hatred would be passed down from one generation to the next.

Amateur and Professional Wolf Baiting

The campaign to eradicate wolves in North America began with private landowners and farmers baiting and trapping wolves. Often, colonists turned wolf baiting into both sport and protection for their livestock. Jon T. Coleman describes an incident that took place in the winter of 1814 deep in the Ohio River Valley, in which John James Audubon assists a farmer as he mutilates trapped wolves.

During the fall, a pack of wolves had robbed [the farmer] of “nearly the whole of his sheep and one of his colts.” For him, it made sense to devote his winter labor to digging pits, weaving platforms, hunting bait, and setting and checking his traps twice daily. The animals had injured him, and “he was now ‘paying them off in full.’” Audubon’s reaction to the slaying of the wolves is less understandable … The ingenious pit traps amazed him, as did the fearsome predators’ meek behavior and the childlike glee the farmer took in his work. The violence Audubon witnessed, however, did not shock him. Watching a pack of dogs rip apart terrified and defenseless animals was a “sport” both he and the farmer found enjoyable.

Further west, in Yellowstone National Park, wolf baiting and hunting had become a lucrative profession. Paul Schullery, in his guidebook to Yellowstone wolves (The Yellowstone Wolf: A Guide & Sourcebook), describes the profession and the devastating affect it had on the Yellowstone wolf population: “At least as early as 1877, ungulate carcasses in the park were poisoned with strychnine by free-lance ‘wolfers’ for ‘wolf or wolverine bait.’ By 1880, [Yellowstone National Park] Superintendent [Philetus] Norris stated in his annual report that ‘…the value of their [wolves and coyotes] hides and their easy slaughter with strychnine-poisoned carcasses have nearly led to their extermination.’”

In the Southwest, as settlers depleted bison, elk, deer, and moose populations – the wolves’ natural prey – the predators turned more and more to picking off livestock. In states like New Mexico where cattle ranching was big business, ranchers responded by turning to professional wolfers and bounty hunters. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reports, “To protect livestock, ranchers and government agencies began an eradication campaign. Bounty programs initiated in the 19th century continued as late as 1965, offering $20 to $50 per wolf. Wolves were trapped, shot, dug from their dens, and hunted with dogs. Poisoned animal carcasses were left out for wolves, a practice that also killed eagles, ravens, foxes, bears, and other animals that fed on the tainted carrion.”

Government-Sanctioned Wolf Extermination Programs   

            

Government Trapper

Towards the end of the 19th Century, wealthy livestock owners increased both their demand for wider grazing ranges and their influence over policymakers in Washington, D.C. In 1885, the federal government established the U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey, initially chartered to research insects and birds. However, the livestock lobby quickly diverted the Bureau’s attention to wolves. Stockowners complained that their land was infested with wolves, calling them “breeding grounds.” They demanded the federal government secure their land for safe pasturage.

In 1906, the U.S. Forest Service acquiesced to the stockowners and enlisted the help of the Bureau of Biological Survey (now USFWS) to clear cattle ranges of gray wolves. In other words, the Bureau became a wolf-extermination unit. Bruce Hampton writes in The Great American Wolf:

That same year [1906], bureau biologist Vernon Bailey traveled to Wyoming and New Mexico to investigate the extent of wolf and coyote depredations. Upon Bailey’s return to Washington, D.C., President Roosevelt invited him to the White House to see what he had learned. Although there is no record of their conversation, immediately following Bailey’s meeting the President, the Biological Survey recommended that the government begin “devising methods for the destruction of the animals [wolves].”

By the middle of the 20th Century, government-sponsored extermination had wiped out nearly all gray wolves in the Lower 48 states. Only a small population remained in northeastern Minnesota and Michigan. Yet the Bureau of Biological Survey was still disseminating anti-wolf propaganda as late as 1940. One poster from the time read:

According to estimates of stockmen [the Custer Wolf, pictured in the poster] killed $25,000 worth of cattle during the seven years he was known in the vicinity of Custer, South Dakota … A local bounty of $500 failed to secure his capture. A Department hunter ended his career of destruction by a skillfully set trap. Many notorious wolves are known to have killed cattle valued at $3000 to $5000 in a year. More than 3,849 wolves have been destroyed by the predatory animal work of the Department and its cooperators since the work was organized in 1915.

It was not until the late sixties, when a greater understanding of natural ecosystems began changing attitudes in the scientific community and the National Park Service, that the plight of wolves in North America began to improve.

In 1973, Congress gave gray wolves protection under the Endangered Species Act. According to Douglas Smith and Gary Ferguson, in Yellowstone National Park, where the last gray wolf was killed in 1926, “the entire [gray wolf] restoration program was guided by directives contained in the Endangered Species Act – a law created to ground a decades-old cornerstone of science that says the healthiest, most stable natural systems tend to be those with high levels of biodiversity.”

Since then, wolf populations throughout the country have increased. In 1995 and 1996, researchers in Yellowstone National Park released 31 Canadian gray wolves back into the wild. The event was hailed as a testament to the conservation movement’s efforts to revive wild wolf populations in America. Yet anti-wolf attitudes persist. Shortly after the release of the Yellowstone wolves a hunter shot and killed Wolf Number 10. Smith and Ferguson write about the incident: “As disturbing as the shooting itself was, more unsavory still was the reaction of a handful of locals who cheered the killing, calling it an act of heroism.”

Photos © Arizona Historical Society

Sources

Coleman, Jon T. Vicious: Wolves and Men in America. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press, 2004.

Hampton, Bruce. The Great American Wolf. New York: Henry Holt and Company, Inc., 1997.

Robinson, Michael J. Predatory Bureaucracy: The Extermination of Wolves and the Transformation of the West. University Press of Colorado, 2005.

Schullery, Paul. The Yellowstone Wolf: A Guide & Sourcebook. Worland, Wyoming: High Plains Publishing Company, Inc., 1996.

Smith, Douglas W. and Gary Ferguson. Decade of the Wolf: Returning the Wild to Yellowstone. Guilford, Connecticut: The Lyons Press, 2005.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. Gray Wolf Fact Sheet. [updated January 2007; cited November 2008]

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/the-wolf-that-changed-america/wolf-wars-americas-campaign-to-eradicate-the-wolf/4312/

===

The Wolf That Changed America

===

Photo:  Courtesy Nexus wolf wallpaper

Video: Courtesy YouTube thejungletv95

Posted in: Wolf  Wars

Tags:  gray wolf, wolves or livestock, wolf intolerance, The Wolf That Changed America, Nature

Published in: on October 7, 2014 at 2:59 am  Comments (17)  
Tags: , ,

Just In Time – Wyoming Wolf Hunt Would Have Started Today

gray wolf_cc_Wikimedia user Walterince

October 1, 2014

Judge Jackson denied Wyoming’s attempt to regain control of wolves, so they could proceed with the planned wolf hunt that would have started today. Her ruling came just in time.

===

From Wyoming, Game and Fish Website:

===

Federal Judge Ruling Continues Suspension of Wolf Hunting in Wyoming

9/30/2014

CHEYENNE – A ruling today by a federal district court judge in Washington, D.C. continues the suspension of gray wolf hunting in Wyoming. After two years of hunting, U.S. District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson ruled on Sept. 23 that Wyoming’s plan was not legally sufficient to support the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2012 rule allowing limited take of gray wolves.

Wyoming Game and Fish Department Chief Game Warden Brian Nesvik said, “We are disappointed in the ruling that removes the Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s ability to manage gray wolves in Wyoming. We will continue to work with the Wyoming Attorney General’s Office to address relevant concerns and ensure wolf management is returned to the state.”

Today’s ruling continues the suspension of the wolf season and all other take of wolves in the state. In response to the ruling, Wyoming filed an emergency regulation to address the concerns stated by Judge Jackson, but Jackson ruled the emergency regulation was not sufficient to alter the judgment she imposed last week.

The Game and Fish has suspended all sales of gray wolf licenses and will establish a system to refund hunters who have already purchased a 2014 gray wolf license. Hunting in the trophy game area in northwest Wyoming was scheduled to begin Oct. 1.

http://wgfd.wyo.gov/web2011/news-1002269.aspx

===

Photo:  Courtesy USFWS

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Wyoming wolves

Tags: U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson,  Wyoming wolves, wolf hunt cancelled

Good News!! “Federal Judge Denies Wyoming’s Request To Regain Control of Wolf Management”

howlingwolfkewlwallpaersdotcom-1

Today, U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson denied Wyoming’s desperate attempt to change her ruling, so the state could proceed with their precious wolf hunts! Too bad, hunters are going to have to get refunds on their wolf tags!

As of this moment it’s still illegal to kill a wolf in Wyoming. Thank you Judge Jackson, it feels so good to have a victory for wolves, even though I’m saddened that wolves in Montana and Idaho are being hunted and Minnesota and Wisconsin hunts are just around the corner. But today we can celebrate that Wyoming wolves will be safe from hunter’s bullets and will  no longer be treated as vermin, to be shot on sight in 80% of the state.

For all the wolves, For Wyoming wolves,

Nabeki

====

Federal Judge Denies Wyoming’s Request To Regain Control of Wolf Management

Article by: BEN NEARY , Associated Press Updated: September 30, 2014 – 4:15 PM

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — A federal judge has denied requests from the state of Wyoming, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service, and pro-hunting groups to change a decision last week that reinstates federal protections for wolves in the state.

U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday denied requests to change her ruling.

Wyoming had requested fast action on its reconsideration request because the state had planned to allow hunters to begin killing wolves Wednesday in an area bordering Yellowstone National Park. The judge’s ruling bars any hunting.

Conservation groups sued in 2012, saying the state’s management plan failed to protect wolves adequately. The state plan classified wolves as predators that could be shot on sight in most areas.

A lawyer for the state says officials haven’t decided whether to appeal.

http://www.startribune.com/politics/national/277653971.html

===

Photo: Courtesy Wiki

Posted in: Wyoming wolves, gray wolf, Wolf Wars

Tags: Wyoming, gray wolf, Judge Jackson,  Wyoming wolves remain listed, Judge denies Wyoming request, good news, Wyoming wolves remain safe from hunts

Iconic 06 To Be Immortalized On Film….

O6 Female CC BY 2.0 Flickr

She was the alpha female of Yellowstone’s Lamar Canyon pack, the most famous wolf in the world, with many names. The O6 female, collared wolf 832f, Rockstar but she was most commonly called O6, after her birth year. She was the granddaughter of the beloved Druid Peak Pack alphas, 42F and 21M. She was a legend.

From Notes From The Field:

“She left her family as a young adult and lived a colorful and independent life for the next few years. She became a master elk hunter, one of the best in Yellowstone, and was famous for killing elk by herself. In addition, 06 had scores of suitors over the years. During one mating season she bred with five different males. She left each of those males, however, and
continued to live independently sometimes in temporary association with a few other wolves, sometimes as a lone wolf.

When she was nearly four years old, in early 2010, 06 finally settled down. She ran into two yearling brothers who had just dispersed from their pack. They were later collared and given the numbers 754 and 755. At the time that 06 met the two brothers, they had already started a partnership with seven sisters who controlled a high quality territory. Their father, the
pack’s alpha male, had recently left the group and the sisters needed new males. Despite the brothers being in such favorable circumstances, 06 managed to lure them away from the other females and they joined her in establishing a new pack. That event said a lot about 06. The brothers judged her to be more valuable than seven females.

Being only yearlings, the two brothers had not bred while 06 had more experience. Perhaps due to the significant difference in their ages and experience levels, the brothers, with 755 as  alpha male, were willing to let 06 be the undisputed leader of the new group they formed: the Lamar Canyon Pack. Both brothers bred with 06 a month later. She discovered an old wolf den near Slough Creek and prepared it for her pups. The site was centrally located in an area with enough prey to support her family. But it had one disadvantage: grizzlies were very common in the region. In mid-April, 06 had four gray pups in that den: two males and two females. Since the opening to the den was visible from the road, we often saw 06 nursing the pups and carrying them back into the den when they strayed too far away.

Fiercely protective of her pups, 06 frequently had to deal with grizzlies that approached her den. She would run at a bear, get behind it, bite the rear end, then run off in the opposite direction of her pups. The grizzly would chase her, but could not match her speed or agility. When the bear stopped, 06 would run back, bite it again on the hind quarters and draw it further away. In one case she spent twelve hours decoying a grizzly away from her pups before she felt it was lured a safe distance away and only then returned to the den. That fall, when the pups were old enough to travel, she led her pack a few miles to the east and resettled her family in Lamar Valley. That had been the territory of her ancestors, the Druid Peak Pack..”

Read more: 

http://www.as.wvu.edu/biology/bio21site/Rick’s%20Field%20Notes%204-2013.pdf

Lamar Canyon Pack Flickr_CC BY_ND 2.0

Sadly, on a cold December day in 2012, her life came to a sudden and ugly end. Brought down by a hunter’s bullet, as she ranged outside the safety of Yellowstone’s boundaries, something she rarely did,  the wolf who had come to mean so much to so many, was no more.

Now a book and film are memorializing her life. She is the ambassador for all  wolves who’ve suffered and died due to the unnecessary delisting of  gray wolves and speedy wolf hunts that followed in 5 states: Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Minnesota,  Wisconsin with Michigan not far behind. UPDATE: On September 23, 2014, District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson  reinstated  ESA protections for Wyoming wolves, it is now illegal to kill a wolf in Wyoming.

I hope the film, along with celebrating her life, will confront why wolves are being hunted at all. O6 and thousands of other wolves, who’ve been brought down by hunter’s bullets, would still be with us today if they hadn’t been betrayed by Congress and the Obama administration.  The infamous budget bill wolf delisting rider, passed in 2011, wiped out decades of wolf recovery and seriously weakened the Endangered Species Act.  Now wolves face a USFWS national delisting, which would remove all federal protections for wolves in the lower 48, including areas where they remain listed, including western Oregon and Washington.

The movie and book are called American Wolf. Thank you Leonardo for taking on this project to tell the O6 story. It’s well worth telling and in the process will elevate the discussion of the importance of wolves. This could be a game changer!

===

Leonardo DiCaprio Tackling Wild Animal Tale ‘American Wolf’ (Exclusive)

2:29 PM PST 09/26/2014 by Borys Kit

Wolf tells the story of O-Six, who in some circles was the world’s most famous wild animal. The female alpha wolf was collared and tracked by researchers at Yellowstone National Park, gaining a huge following from not only scientists but the public as well. She was shot by a hunter in 2012 just outside the park’s boundaries, an act that caused howls around the country (she even got an obituary inThe New York Times)

Read More: 

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/leonardo-dicaprio-tackling-wild-animal-735948

===

===

Photos: Courtesy Treehugger (CC BY 2.0 Flickr) (Flickr/CC BY-ND 2.0)

Video: Courtesy YouTube/ SuperMontanamike

Posted in: Wolf Wars, gray wolf, Yellowstone Wolves, biodiversity, trophy hunting

Tags: American Wolf, O6 female, wolf 832f, Rockstar, Yellowstone’s Lamar Canyon alpha female, iconic Druid Peak Pack alphas, 21m and 42f, Yellowstone National Park, Leonardo DiCaprio, wolf hunting, wolf delisting via budget bill rider 2011, wolf persecution, stop the wolf hunts

CBD Press Release: Victory For Wolves In Wyoming!

Gray wolf_National Park Service Photo

September 24, 2014

I could post this news everyday for the next month and it wouldn’t get old. Here’s the Center For Biological Diversity’s press release on the relisting of wolves in Wyoming. Good bye Wyoming predator zone, you can no longer treat wolves like vermin! The Wyoming wolf  trophy hunt, due to start in October, has been cancelled. Music to my ears! Thank you again Earth Justice and all who were involved in this fight!

 A great victory for Wyoming wolves!  Judge Amy Berman Jackson of the U.S. District Court  “invalidated the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2012 statewide Endangered Species Act delisting of the species.” What welcome news, it’s been a long time coming!

===

For Immediate Release: September 23, 2014

Victory for Wolves in Wyoming

Federal Judge Reinstates Federal Protections Statewide

WASHINGTON— Federal protections for gray wolves in Wyoming were reinstated today after a judge invalidated the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2012 statewide Endangered Species Act delisting of the species. The ruling from the U.S. District Court halts the management of wolves by Wyoming, a state with a history of hostile and extreme anti-wolf policies.

“The court has ruled and Wyoming’s kill-on-sight approach to wolf management throughout much of the state must stop,” said Earthjustice attorney Tim Preso. “Today’s ruling restores much-needed federal protection to wolves throughout Wyoming, which allowed killing along the borders of Yellowstone National Park and throughout national forest lands south of Jackson Hole where wolves were treated as vermin under state management. If Wyoming wants to resume management of wolves, it must develop a legitimate conservation plan that ensures a vibrant wolf population in the northern Rockies.”

Earthjustice represented Defenders of Wildlife, Natural Resources Defense Council, the Sierra Club and the Center for Biological Diversity in challenging the Fish and Wildlife Service’s September 2012 decision to strip Endangered Species Act protections from gray wolves in Wyoming. The conservation groups challenged the 2012 decision on grounds that Wyoming law authorized unlimited wolf killing in a “predator” zone that extended throughout most of the state, and provided inadequate protection for wolves even where killing was regulated.

“Today the court affirmed that delisting gray wolves in Wyoming by the Obama administration was premature and a violation of federal law,” said Defenders of Wildlife president and CEO Jamie Rappaport Clark. “Any state that has a wolf-management plan that allows for unlimited wolf killing throughout most of the state should not be allowed to manage wolves. Wolves need to remain protected under the Endangered Species Act until the species is fully recovered. State laws and policies that treat wolves like vermin are as outdated and discredited today as they were a century ago.”

“The decision makes clear that ‘shoot-on-sight’ is not an acceptable management plan for wolves across the majority of the state,” said Dr. Sylvia Fallon, senior scientist and wildlife conservation director at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “It’s time for Wyoming to step back and develop a more science-based approach to managing wolves.”

“The court has rightly recognized the deep flaws in Wyoming’s wolf management plan. History has shown that sound, science-based management practices are at the heart of successful efforts to bring animals back from the brink of extinction. Sound management will ensure that we can continue to reap the benefits wolves bring to the region,” said Bonnie Rice of the Sierra Club’s Greater Yellowstone Our Wild America Campaign. 

“We’re thrilled that protections for Wyoming’s fragile population of wolves have been restored,” said Noah Greenwald, endangered species director with the Center for Biological Diversity. “With Wyoming allowing wolves to be shot on sight across more than 80 percent of the state, there is no way protections for wolves should have ever been removed.”

The 2012 delisting of wolves in Wyoming turned wolf management over to the state, which opened up over 80 percent of its land to unlimited wolf killing and provided weak protections for wolves in the remainder. Since the delisting 219 wolves have been killed under Wyoming’s management. Prior to the 2012 reversal of its position, the Fish and Wildlife Service denied Wyoming the authority to manage wolves in the state due to its extremely hostile anti-wolf laws and policies.

Background
There were once up to 2 million gray wolves living in North America, but the animals were driven to near-extinction in the lower 48 states by the early 1900s. After passage of the federal Endangered Species Act in 1973 and protection of the wolf as endangered, federal recovery programs resulted in the rebound of wolf populations in limited parts of the country. Roughly 5,500 wolves currently live in the continental United States — a fraction of the species’ historic numbers.

The Fish and Wildlife Service is currently proposing to remove Endangered Species Act protection for most gray wolves across the United States, a proposal that the groups strongly oppose; a final decision could be made later this year.

LEGAL DOCUMENTS: http://earthjustice.org/sites/default/files/files/14-09-23%20Doc%20%2068%20OPINION.pdf

http://earthjustice.org/sites/default/files/files/14-09-23%20Doc%20%2067%20ORDER%20%282%29.pdf

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2014/wolf-09-23-2014.html

===

Photo: Courtesy NPS

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Wyoming Wolves,

Tags: Victory for Wyoming Wolves, Center For Biological Diversity, predator zone, wolves are not vermin

Victory! Federal Judge Reinstates Protections For Wyoming Wolves!!!!

Wolves in lamar valley_ Earth Justice

September 23, 2014

Finally I have good news to report! Wyoming wolves have regained their federal protections! Thank you Earth Justice!

====

VICTORY FOR WOLVES IN WYOMING

Victory: Federal Judge Reinstates Federal Protections Statewide
Earth Justice
September 23, 2014
Washington, D.C. —

Federal protections for gray wolves in Wyoming were reinstated today after a judge invalidated the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s 2012 statewide Endangered Species Act delisting of the species. The ruling from the U.S. District Court halts the management of wolves by Wyoming, a state with a history of hostile and extreme anti-wolf policies.

“The court has ruled and Wyoming’s kill-on-sight approach to wolf management throughout much of the state must stop,” said Earthjustice attorney Tim Preso. “Today’s ruling restores much-needed federal protection to wolves throughout Wyoming, which allowed killing along the borders of Yellowstone National Park and throughout national forest lands south of Jackson Hole where wolves were treated as vermin under state management. If Wyoming wants to resume management of wolves, it must develop a legitimate conservation plan that ensures a vibrant wolf population in the Northern Rockies.”

Earthjustice represented Defenders of Wildlife, Natural Resources Defense Council, the Sierra Club and the Center for Biological Diversity in challenging the Fish and Wildlife Service’s September 2012 decision to strip Endangered Species Act protections from gray wolves in Wyoming. The conservation groups challenged the 2012 decision on grounds that Wyoming law authorized unlimited wolf killing in a “predator” zone that extended throughout most of the state, and provided inadequate protection for wolves even where killing was regulated.

“Today the court affirmed that delisting gray wolves in Wyoming by the Obama administration was premature and a violation of federal law,” said Defenders of Wildlife President and CEO Jamie Rappaport Clark. “Any state that has a wolf management plan that allows for unlimited wolf killing throughout most of the state should not be allowed to manage wolves. Wolves need to remain protected under the Endangered Species Act until the species is fully recovered. State laws and policies that treat wolves like vermin are as outdated and discredited today as they were a century ago.”

“The decision makes clear that ‘shoot-on-sight’ is not an acceptable management plan for wolves across the majority of the state,” said Dr. Sylvia Fallon, senior scientist and wildlife conservation director at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “It’s time for Wyoming to step back and develop a more science-based approach to managing wolves.”

“The court has rightly recognized the deep flaws in Wyoming’s wolf management plan. Wolves in Wyoming must have federal protection until the state gets it right. That means developing a science-based management plan that recognizes the many benefits wolves bring to the region instead of vermin that can be shot on sight in the majority of the state,” said Bonnie Rice of the Sierra Club’s Greater Yellowstone Our Wild America Campaign. 

“We’re thrilled that protections for Wyoming’s fragile population of wolves have been restored,” said Noah Greenwald, endangered species director with the Center for Biological Diversity. “With Wyoming allowing wolves to be shot on sight across more than 80 percent of the state, there is no way protections for wolves should have ever been removed.”

The 2012 delisting of wolves in Wyoming turned wolf management over to the state, which opened up over 80 percent of its land to unlimited wolf killing and provided weak protections for wolves in the remainder. Since the delisting, 219 wolves have been killed under Wyoming’s management. Prior to the 2012 reversal of its position, the Fish and Wildlife Service denied Wyoming the authority to manage wolves in the state due to its extremely hostile anti-wolf laws and policies.

Background: There were once up to 2 million gray wolves living in North America, but the animals were driven to near-extinction in the lower 48 states by the early 1900s. After passage of the federal Endangered Species Act in 1973 and protection of the wolf as endangered, federal recovery programs resulted in the rebound of wolf populations in limited parts of the country. Roughly 5,500 wolves currently live in the continental United States — a fraction of the species’ historic numbers.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is currently proposing to remove Endangered Species Act protection for most gray wolves across the United States, a proposal that the groups strongly oppose; a final decision could be made later this year.

http://earthjustice.org/news/press/2014/victory-for-wolves-in-wyoming

===

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Wyoming wolves

Photo: Courtesy Earth Justice

Tags: Wyoming wolves regain protections, Earth Justice, Tim Preso, Victory

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 4,502 other followers

%d bloggers like this: