More Stupidity From The Fringe…..

Effects of elk overgrazing in Yellowstone

“The top photo……from a paper by Ripple and his colleague Robert Beschta, was taken in 1991; the photo below is from 2002 and illustrates the recovery of streamside cottonwoods after just seven years of wolf presence.”…Todd Palmer and Rod Pringle

October 9, 2013

Wolves are being slaughtered left and right but that’s not enough for the wolf haters. They still  find it necessary to visit this blog and spew their anti wolf dogma. The main talking points are centered around the sub species of wolf reintroduced in 95/96.  The story goes that Occidentalis is the big, bad Canadian wolf who replaced the sweet, loving Irremotus. That of course is BS. Yes, Occidentalis was the sub species reintroduced to Yellowstone and Central Idaho..but the myth that they are super wolves is absolutely ridiculous. Wolves are wolves, apex predators who are vital to healthy Eco-systems.

Unlike human hunters, who kill the strongest and genetically sound animals, wolves select out the weak, sick, old and yes sometimes the young, which  helps control ungulate populations. Wolves don’t hide behind AR-15′s, they go toe to toe with their prey, that’s fair chase. Human hunters use heavy firepower, traps, snares and every sneaky trick in the book to torture, abuse, maim and kill animals.  Trophy hunters have nothing to be proud of. NOTHING! They wouldn’t be such big, brave “hunters” if they were limited to using their bare hands. Fair chase my a@%.

Canus lupis Irremotus are very similar to Canis Lupus Occidentalis, who are a bit heavier but still both sub species are wolves. They live in packs, hunt cooperatively and put family above all else.

“Canis Lupus Irremotus…..This subspecies generally weighs 70–135 pounds (32–61 kg) and stands at 26–32 inches, making it one of the largest subspecies of the gray wolf in existence. It is a lighter colored animal than its southern brethren, the Southern Rocky Mountains wolf, with a coat that includes far more white and less black. In general, the subspecies favors lighter colors, with black mixing in among them”…..Wiki

Occidentalis has always lived on both sides of the Northern Rockies US/Canadian border, since wolves know no boundaries. Anyone who believes otherwise is living in a fantasy world.  The idea that Occidentalis is foreign to American soil is absurd. They’ve been crossing back and forth across that “border” for tens of thousands of years.

The burning question I have for the professors of wolfology is if Irremotus was loved so much, why the hell did their wolf hating forefathers try to wipe them out?  Of course  attempting to reason with the unreasonable is an exercise in futility, so I don’t expect a cogent response to that question.

The other favorite talking point of wolf haters is the Yellowstone elk herd. Wolves are accused of decimating the elk in Yellowstone, when in fact it was the feds who were killing Yellowstone elk for decades, in the wolf’s absence, due to the damage elk were wreaking in the park.

“Once the wolves were gone the elk began to take over. Over the next few years conditions of Yellowstone National Park declined drastically. A team of scientists visiting Yellowstone in 1929 and 1933 reported, “The range was in deplorable conditions when we first saw it, and its deterioration has been progressing steadily since then.” By this time many biologists were worried about eroding land and plants dying off. The elk were multiplying inside the park and deciduous, woody species such as aspen and cottonwood suffered from overgrazing. The park service started trapping and moving the elk and, when that was not effective, killing them. This killing continued for more than 30 years. This method helped the land quality from worsening, but didn’t improve the conditions. At times, people would mention bringing wolves back to Yellowstone to help control the elk population. The Yellowstone managers were not eager to bring back wolves, especially after having so successfully ridding the park of them, so they continued killing elk. In the late 1960s, local hunters began to complain to their congressmen that there were too few elk, and the congressmen threatened to stop funding Yellowstone. Killing elk was given up as a response, and then the population of the elk increased exponentially. With the rapid increase in the number of elk, the condition of the land again went quickly downhill. The destruction of the landscape affected many other animals. With the wolves gone, the population of coyotes increased dramatically, which led to an extreme decrease in the number of pronghorn antelope.However, the increase in the elk population caused the most profound change in the ecosystem of Yellowstone after the wolves were gone.”.…..Wiki

Elk numbers had swelled to over twenty thousand while wolves were away…a very bad thing for Yellowstone. As Aldo Leopold so eloquently states in Thinking Like A Mountain:

“I have lived to see state after state extirpate its wolves. I have watched the face of many a newly wolfless mountain, and seen the south-facing slopes wrinkle with a maze of new deer trails. I have seen every edible bush and seedling browsed, first to anaemic desuetude, and then to death. I have seen every edible tree defoliated to the height of a saddlehorn. Such a mountain looks as if someone had given God a new pruning shears, and forbidden Him all other exercise. In the end the starved bones of the hoped-for deer herd, dead of its own too-much, bleach with the bones of the dead sage, or molder under the high-lined junipers.

“I now suspect that just as a deer herd lives in mortal fear of its wolves, so does a mountain live in mortal fear of its deer. And perhaps with better cause, for while a buck pulled down by wolves can be replaced in two or three years, a range pulled down by too many deer may fail of replacement in as many decades. So also with cows. The cowman who cleans his range of wolves does not realize that he is taking over the wolf’s job of trimming the herd to fit the range. He has not learned to think like a mountain. Hence we have dust-bowls, and rivers washing the future into the sea.”

Do your homework wolf haters and stop parroting talking points drilled into your heads by the hunting and ranching cabal.

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ff

Submitted on 2013/07/14 at 1:17 pm | In reply to Helga Guillen.
Kill them alL!
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Andrew Light

Submitted on 2013/08/02 at 3:37 am
You antis need to go back to high school and learn about “carrying capacity.” fuck these wolves. bet half of you didn’t know these aren’t even the same breed of wolves we once had. i hope all your pets get eaten by wolves. Trap and hunt for life, come stop me please.
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LUNATIC OUTPOST FTW

Submitted on 2013/08/17 at 5:46 pm
who cares kill the wolves, IDGAF. stupid libtards.
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steve

Submitted on 2013/08/28 at 7:08 pm
You guys dont have much of a clue about wolves! You need to be educated on wolves! You should look at the web site “saveelk.com”. Read the Lynn Stutter on the truth about wolves!
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80hd

Submitted on 2013/09/03 at 11:21 am
Dispelling a myth, eh? The original wolves in Yellowstone were C. l. irremotus…. the wolves introduced were C. l. occidentalis. Guess where they came from?
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O.
submitted on 2013/09/17 at 10:28 am | In reply to Jan.| In reply to Jan.
Dear Jan,
I have lived in the West all my life. I am dedicated to conservation and habitat improvement for all native wildlife. The Canadian Grey Wolf is not native to Idaho, Montana or Wyoming. The Rocky Mountain Wolves that were documented living here in the 1980′s and early 1990′s were scavengers and did not efficiently hunt in packs. The native wolves were solitary, except during mating season, had large territories and made very little impact on prey species within their range.

The efforts to control the exploding population if this invasive species of wolves are warranted by the respective States because they need to protect native wildlife, livestock, tourism, habitat, and a number of other issues which are more important than accommodating a Federal Government’s program to establish a feral nightmare.
It is not about killing wolves. It is about protecting our ecosystems.
Respectfully,
O.

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Mark

Submitted on 2013/09/23 at 2:40 pm
That’s all fine and good but humans shouldn’t die so that these predators can thrive. Pure bleeding heart BS..

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matt

Submitted on 2013/09/30 at 1:57 pm
This is the biggest hunk of shit that I have ever read. You tree hugging fucks need to get a real job! “Protecting the Wolves” from the big bad ranchers and hunters. Please!

The “reimbursements” for cattle killed in New Mexico, are still yet to be seen. Countless cattle killed on ranches and not a penny in site. Furthermore, when the average cost to introduce one of these wolves is upwards of $1 million dollars, and our tax dollars go to this bullshit rather than the present deficit that our failed president has bestowed upon our country…
Sickening

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John

Submitted on 2013/10/06 at 3:40 pm

Thought you might like to read a response from one of the sickest part of the population. How much time do any of you spend on wildlife conservation? How many hrs per year do any of you spend on habitat renewal? I am willing to bet not as much time as your average hunter. I enjoy every second I spend in the wilderness I personally see hundreds of animals in a year. I also see the impact on the animals from over population. I see the side of nature most of you want to pretend doesn’t exist. The starving animals and the displaced wolves, coyotes, fox and others. You say its wrong to kill a coyote. Say that when you find one in your backyard about to rip your child apart. Ask a rancher how they feel about wolves. You won’t hear many say they like them.

Now onto “trophy hunting”. Trophy hunting and caged hunts are as different as night and day. Any respectable hunter would never take part in a caged hunt. Most people that do are rich wall street types that have no morals in the first place. A true Trophy hunter is not a butcher. They are men and women just like you. However they posses what some call the alpha gene. Most of these ” butchers” and “serial killers” see more animals than all of you combined. Maybe the kill one or two. They kill them because they are the oldest and largest of the type. A damn hard thing to do. Instead of blaming hunters maybe you should focus you misguided anger towards the developers. The ones who keep pushing the city further into the habitat of these animals. Believe it or not I love animals just as much if not more than most of you. I however am not afraid to get my hands bloody fixing the mess created by the non hunter. You might hand out meals at a soup kitchen. But hunters are the ones who put the meat on the plate.

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NOBODY

Submitted on 2013/10/04 at 4:41 pm | In reply to Daniel Martinez.

I live and hunt in Wyoming. Now hear me out, I do not hate wolves and do not want them to go extinct, but wolves have killed over 50% of our elk herds near Yellowstone and have completely decimated our moose, bighorn sheep, mountain goat, and deer herds. I agree that shooting a wolf right when it exits the park is kind of unethical, and that Wyoming needs wolves in its ecosystem. The thing is, these wolf populations have to be kept in check, and hunting is a good way to do that.

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These hateful views are represented by the hunting and ranching monopoly,  who in turn control policy makers in Washington, on both sides of the aisle. Their disinformation campaign has spread like a virus across this country and is contributing to the mass slaughter of wolves now taking place!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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Why We Need Wolves In Our Parks

Todd Palmer and Rob Pringle

Posted March 20, 2009 | 12:32 AM (EST)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/todd-palmer-and-rob-pringle/why-we-need-wolves-in-our_b_177209.html

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Top Photo: Courtesy Huffington Post

Bottom Photo: Courtesy of Brett Havestick

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Trophy hunting, Biodiversity

Tags: Canis Lupus Occidentalis, Canis Lupus Irremotus, anti wolfers ill-informed, biodiversity, trophic cascades, Aldo Leopold, Thinking Like A Mountain, trophy hunting animal abuse, hateful rhetoric, non science based thinking, lies and damn lies.

Remember The Wolves On Earth Day….

Remember the wolves earth-day-2013.jpg.pagespeed.ic.3sfir4FsoF

BE THEIR VOICE

‘Let the Wolves run free’ by Ratty and the Watchers

Wolf Pack Howling On Lake

Your amber eyes and coat of ashes,
I see sorrow in your face,
With the pain the young one thrashes,
a trophy for the human race,
Hunted down I feel the heartache,
from ancient dens the wolves must flee,
Misunderstood beliefs we must break,
education is the key.

I saw a pack when in full flight,
Brothers / sisters chasing starlight,
Their hearts are yearning to be free of our world.

In the night an Alpha male howls,
it’s a song of such beauty,
All they hear is Hollywood growls,
and not the call to his family,
Never safe on the lonely mountain,
the guns are heard in the deep valley,
Another notch on the butt of a rifle,
a cub added to the death tally.

Shadows dancing on moonlit skies,
Leave them be don’t wave them goodbye,
All they want is to be free of our world.

Look in his face, Look in his eyes, there’s only grace, there’s no disguise
Look at their life, what do you see, don’t give them strife, let them run free,
Let the Wolves run free!!

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Video: YouTube Ratty and the Watchers

Photo: Wolves Howling on Lake, Courtesy Jim Brandenburg

Posted in: gray wolves, biodiversity

Tags: biodiversity, gray wolf, Let the Wolves Run Free,  Ratty and the Watchers

‘Let the Wolves run free’ by Ratty and the Watchers

Wolf Pack Howling On Lake

Your amber eyes and coat of ashes,
I see sorrow in your face,
With the pain the young one thrashes,
a trophy for the human race,
Hunted down I feel the heartache,
from ancient dens the wolves must flee,
Misunderstood beliefs we must break,
education is the key.

I saw a pack when in full flight,
Brothers / sisters chasing starlight,
Their hearts are yearning to be free of our world.

In the night an Alpha male howls,
it’s a song of such beauty,
All they hear is Hollywood growls,
and not the call to his family,
Never safe on the lonely mountain,
the guns are heard in the deep valley,
Another notch on the butt of a rifle,
a cub added to the death tally.

Shadows dancing on moonlit skies,
Leave them be don’t wave them goodbye,
All they want is to be free of our world.

Look in his face, Look in his eyes, there’s only grace, there’s no disguise
Look at their life, what do you see, don’t give them strife, let them run free,
Let the Wolves run free!!

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Video: YouTube Ratty and the Watchers

Photo: Wolves Howling on Lake, Courtesy Jim Brandenburg

Posted in: gray wolves, biodiversity

Tags: biodiversity, gray wolf, Let the Wolves Run Free,  Ratty and the Watchers

Raul Grijalva For Interior Secretary

Tell President Obama: Appoint Raúl Grijalva US Interior Secretary

Tell President Obama: Appoint Raul Grijalva US Interior Secretary

A Champion For Our Public Lands. Protecting Our National Treasures. A Bold Leader.

For Secretary of Interior, the choice is clear. President Obama should appoint Rep. Raul Grijalva. He’s a bold leader and a champion of our public lands who will protect our natural treasures, including American wild horses and burros, for generations to come.

Dear President Obama,

Your choice for the next Secretary of the Interior will determine the future of our public lands and their natural resources, including wild horses and burros.The individual you appoint must reflect the ideals that you campaigned upon and that so many of us supported.

The person best qualified to represent these ideals and move the Interior Department forward is Rep. Raul Grijalva, Congressman from Arizona’s Third Congressional District.

Rep. Grijalva has spent his entire career standing up to special interests and for American taxpayers and the preservation of our natural resources. As the top Democrat on the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands since 2007, he has been an outspoken advocate for conservation. He has also been a leader in the fight to reform the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) costly and inhumane wild horse and burro program.

As Interior Secretary, Rep. Grijalva will hold the BLM accountable, and he will stop the government giveaway of public resources to commercial interests that exploit our public lands.

Please nominate Rep. Raul Grijalva as the 51st Secretary of the Interior. He is clearly the best choice to protect and preserve our public lands and our natural heritage, including America’s treasured wild horses and burros.

Sincerely,

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PLEASE ClICK HERE TO SIGN PETITION

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Petition credit given to: www.wildhorsepreservation.org

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Howling For Justice

Tags: Wild Horse Preservation dot org, Appoint Raul Grijalva, Secretary of the Interior, biodiversity, gray wolves, wild horses, President Obama

“How lonely is the night without the howl of a wolf.” ~ Unknown

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The Inmates Are Running The Asylum…

September 5, 2012

For over a decade the USFWS  has said no to Wyoming’s brutal wolf slaughter plan, designed to exterminate wolves without mercy,  treating them as vermin, to be shot-on-sight in most of the state.

In 2009 the Obama administration delisted wolves in the Northern Rockies but Wyoming wolves were excluded because the USFWS would not accept their “wolf management/slaughter plan”.  Wyoming wolves remained under the protection of the ESA.

In response to the delisting a legal challenge was mounted by environmental groups and on August 5, 2010 Judge Donald Molloy  relisted wolves  in the Northern Rockies.  He stated the USFWS  could not  separate wolves by state for delisting. Either they strip wolves in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho of their ESA protections or they keep them all listed. Read his decision here.

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Judge orders protections reinstated for wolf

By MATT VOLZ, AP, Idaho Statesman, 08/05/10 [here]

A federal judge has ordered endangered species protections reinstated for the gray wolf in Montana and Idaho.

The federal government last year removed protections for wolves in those two states but not Wyoming. U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy says in his ruling Thursday the government’s decision was a political solution and does not comply with the federal Endangered Species Act.

Molloy says the entire Rocky Mountain wolf population must be either listed or removed as an endangered species, but the protections can’t be separated by state. (Wildlife and People)

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But now, as Idaho and Montana are busy slaughtering wolves, while  USFWS watches, the agency has decided Wyoming’s shoot-on-site wolf plan is just perfect after all.  The approx. 270 wolves who live outside Yellowstone can now be used for target practice, killed anytime of the day or night, without a permit. They can be run over by snowmobiles or ATV’s, hung from a tree, torn apart, set on fire or anything a sick mind can come up with. That’s the fate of Wyoming wolves.  The cruel irony is one of the excuses given for killing so many wolves is Wyoming hunters  accused wolves of decimating elk herds in the state but that’s been proven to be false.  It was recently reported that many of Wyoming’s  elk herds have grown so large extra licenses will be handed out to hunters to kill more elk.  The hypocrites and their lies have been exposed!

From the Wildlife News: 

Wyoming elk herds have grown too large

by  on SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 

Wyoming Game and Fish Department offers extra elk licenses

Now that Wyoming has gained the authority to manage wolves and will soon have a wolf hunt, the much lamented lack of elk due to those “insatiable packs of killing machines” — wolves — has suddenly turned around and there are said to be too many elk . . . just like that.

 Brian Nesvik, chief of the wildlife division for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department says “in many areas of the state, those herds have simply grown too large.”  Therefore, the state has made an emergency order providing for an extra, reduced-price cow elk and elk calf license in some of the areas with too many elk.  In fact, Game and Fish is trying so hard to get more hunting in the larger elk herds that they are offering special elk hunts on private lands. They are even encouraging elk hunters to buy three elk tags in some parts of the state.

READ MORE:

http://www.thewildlifenews.com/2012/09/04/wyoming-elk-herds-have-grown-too-large/

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Wyoming Game and Fish Department offers extra elk licenses

 September 03, 2012 10:00 am  •  By CHRISTINE PETERSON Star-Tribune staff writer

 Graceful and majestic, elk are one of Wyoming’s icons. Large herds draw hunters, photographers and viewers from around the globe hoping to catch a glimpse of a bull’s huge rack and hear its roaring bugle.

But in many areas of the state, those herds have simply grown too large, said Brian Nesvik, chief of the wildlife division for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department.

Game and Fish officials have tried recently to encourage hunting in the larger herds, even offering special elk hunts on private lands monitored by biologists. Department officials are going one step further this hunting season. Hunters can now buy three elk licenses in some areas.

Until this year, Wyoming state statute mandated each hunter could only hold two elk licenses. The Wyoming Legislature gave Game and Fish the ability to control elk license numbers during its last session. Wildlife officials made an emergency order in August offering an extra reduced-price cow and calf license in some of those overpopulated areas, Nesvik said.

http://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/wyoming-game-and-fish-department-offers-extra-elk-licenses/article_7e73f58d-ae37-526d-9715-67c2f43f2086.html?comment_form=true

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We know the excuses for killing wolves in Wyoming and other states for that matter, are a sham.  There is no reason to slaughter wolves.  The propaganda campaign waged by the livestock and hunting cabals is just that, propaganda. It’s Kabuki Theater played out to justify the unjustifiable.

So what’s changed at USFWS and their 180 turn on the long sought after Wyoming wolf killing plan? Absolutely nothing except the appointment of Dan Ashe as head of USFWS.

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This was reported by the Wildlife News on July 1, 2011

“Career professional in agency to assume duties immediately after a long series of Republican “holds” on his nomination

The Fish and Wildlife Service has been led since January 2009 Acting Director Rowan Gould.

“Holds” in the U.S. Senate on bills and nominations have become a kind of one-person filibuster. It is becoming difficult for any President to get anyone approved after his first round of major nominations. Ashe was held up not because of any controversy over his person, but over efforts by Republications to extract policy changes in exchange for allowing a vote.

As “Cody Coyote” wrote in a recent comment in this forum, one of the holds was by a Wyoming U.S. Senator John Barrasso trying to assure that the Service would delist the wolf in Wyoming.”

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Draw your own conclusions on why Ashe’s appointment was “held up”? Was it a quid pro quo to ensure Wyoming wolves would be delisted?

There is something very ugly going on @ USFWS  concerning the delisting of gray wolves. Animals recently off the Endangered Species List are now being hunted, tortured, persecuted and slaughtered all with the approval of USFWS. Idaho and Montana have  started their hunt/killing spree.  Beginning October 1, 2012, Wyoming wolves lives will be worth nothing.  I expect lawsuits to be filed against this  horrific policy but that’s not the point. The fact USFWS would sign on to this after  fighting it for years makes absolutely no sense.  But nothing about ” wolf management” (a euphemism for wolf slaughter) passes the smell test.  Everyday there is a  new scheme to kill wolves. It’s  never-ending.  It’s mind numbing. It’s a repeat of the past. It’s sadistic.

Hard to believe this was all made possible by Obama, his rancher Interior Secretary and US Senate Democrats, who pushed through a delisting rider on the back of a must-pass budget bill.  All those sanctimonious Democrats who bill themselves as “environmentally” friendly, had no problem throwing wolves in the Northern Rockies under the bus to help Senator Tester D-MT  hold onto  his Senate seat, as he panders to the wolf hating crowd back home in Montana.

Now the Great Lakes wolf population is under siege after they were unceremoniously  delisted last year. Almost immediately Wisconsin and Minnesota came up with wolf hunt plans. Wisconsin wanted to chase wolves with dogs.  Judge Peter C. Anderson put a stop to that, slapping a temporary injunction on the plan, preventing wolf  hunters from using dogs. His ruling was in response to a legal challenge brought  by several environmental groups under the premise that the state of Wisconsin was promoting dog fighting.  Hopefully the judge’s injunction will stop the  Wisconsin wolf hunts this season but the DNR is scrambling to make it happen anyway, minus the dogs.

Minnesota, the oh so pragmatic and fair state, is just as bad. For years their policy was a  5 years moratorium on wolf hunts if wolves were ever delisted in the state.

“Minnesota’s initial plans for the species included a five-year moratorium on a hunting season. However that provision was removed by the legislature.” (Twin Cities/Daily Planet)

But lo and behold the Minnesota legislature changed that pretty quickly last year when wolf delisting was imminent.  So much for tolerant Minnesota. Turns out they’re not so tolerant.

Michigan Rep. Huuki-R recently introduced a wolf hunt bill into the state House of Representatives, it looks like wolves will be given no quarter any where they call home.

If we don’t speak out now and turn the tide we’ll lose wolves once again in the lower 48. I’m not sure how many ways I can say this.  I’ve written over seven hundred posts, in the last three years, on this tragedy. What will it take for citizens to finally wake up and realize we’re losing the iconic wolf, the very symbol of wildness and freedom we claim to hold so dear?  How incredibly lucky we are to have  intact ecosystems in the Northern Rockies with all apex predators represented. It’s one of the last vestiges of wildness remaining in the lower 48, yet we’re willing to let it slip away because a tiny majority of hateful people have decided the West and our wildlife belong to them, to dispose of as they see fit?  Wake up America, we’re losing our heritage!!! Are we willing to let the inmates run the asylum? Or will we finally unite for a common purpose to save the gray wolf from the grimmest of fates? You decide!

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Wolves in Wyoming Go from Endangered to Hunted

(NEW YORK) — Federal and state officials are celebrating the successful return of once-endangered wolves to Wyoming — by declaring open season on the animals.

Beginning Oct. 1, gray wolves will be removed from the rolls of the Endangered Species Act and classified as predators, allowing Wyoming hunters to shoot the animals on sight at any time, for any reason, in about 85 percent of the state.

“Our primary goal, and that of the states, is to ensure that gray wolf populations in the Northern Rocky Mountains remain healthy, giving future generations of Americans the chance to hear its howl echo across the area,” said U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe in a prepared statement.

Environmental groups that have gone to court over previous measures to de-list the wolves plan to fight the most recent change in the law, said Connie Wilbert, a field organizer for the Wyoming chapter of the Sierra Club.

Once killed nearly to extinction, in 1978 all species of the gray wolf in the lower 48 states were declared endangered and protected from hunting under federal law.

In the years since they received federal protection, wolf populations have returned across the West. As their numbers swelled, ranchers complained the animals routinely killed their livestock and petitioned the government for permission to kill them.

Removing wolves from the list would give ranchers in much of the state the right to kill wolves on sight. In other areas, wolves will be designated “trophy game” and subject to hunting during seasons regulated by the state.

READ MORE:

http://www.masoncountydailynews.com/news/national-news/38301-wolves-in-wyoming-go-from-endangered-to-hunted

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Photo: Black wolf wallpaper

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Wyoming wolves, Animal cruelty, Howling for Justice

Tags: USFWS about-face, Wyoming wolves, shoot-on-sight, Minnesota wolves, Idaho wolves, Montana wolves, Wisconsin wolves, biodiversity, wolf wars,  wolf slaughter, back to the brutal past

Wolf Pup Howls To Snake River Packmates….

This melted my heart. The wolf pup was howling for its pack and seemed so surprised when they howled back.  The pup is a member of Oregon’s Snake River Pack.

Click here for the rest of the story.

Wolf pups. Wenaha Pack, May 30, 2012

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Video: You Tube

Photo: Courtesy ODFW

Posted in: Oregon wolves, biodiversity, gray wolf

Tags: Snake River Pack, wolf pup, biodiversity, Oregon

What Good Are Wolves by Norm Bishop

An  excellent article by Norm Bishop.

Now, more than ever, it’s imperative we continue to shout down the ignorant , the uniformed and the hateful who seek to  demonize one of natures perfect predators, the wolf.  It’s our job to defend and  fight for them.

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What Good Are Wolves?

A growing body of scientific research shows wolves are key to the ecosystems of the Northern Rockies. Here’s a condensed version compiled by a long-time wolf advocate.

By Norman A. Bishop, Guest Writer, 1-04-11

In 1869, General Phil Sheridan said, “The only good Indians I ever saw were dead.” Others said, “The only good wolf is a dead wolf.”

Barry Lopez wrote of an American Pogrom, not only of Native Americans and wolves, but of the bison on which both depended. Between 1850 and 1890, 75 million bison were killed, mostly for their hides; perhaps 1 million or 2 million wolves.

“Before about 1878, cattlemen were more worried about Indians killing their cattle than they were about wolves. As the land filled up with other ranchers, as water rights became an issue, and as the Indians were removed to reservations, however, the wolf became, as related in Barry Lopez’s book, “Of Wolves and Men,” ‘an object of pathological hatred.’” Lopez continues: “The motive for wiping out wolves (as opposed to controlling them) proceeded from misunderstanding, from illusions of what constituted sport, from strident attachment to private property, from ignorance and irrational hatred.

In 1884, Montana set a bounty on wolves; in the next three years, 10,261 wolves were bountied. “In 1887, the bounty was repealed by a legislature dominated by mining interests. … By 1893 … desperate stockmen were reporting losses that were mathematical impossibilities. The effect of this exaggeration was contagious. The Montana sheep industry, which up to this time had lost more animals to bears and mountain lions than to wolves, began to blame its every downward economic trend on the wolf. … Men in a speculative business like cattle ranching singled out one scapegoat for their financial losses.”

Not until wolves were functionally extinct from much of the West did anyone begin to ask “What good are wolves?” to study wolves, and to report their beneficial effects on their prey species and on the ecosystems where they lived.

Adolph Murie realized that wolves selected weaker Dall sheep, “which may be of great importance to the sheep as a species.” His brother, Olaus J. Murie, thought predators may have an important influence during severe winters in reducing elk herds too large for their winter range. Douglas H. Pimlott pointed out that wolves control their own densities.

Yellowstone National Park wolf project leader Douglas W. Smith says that restoration of wolves there has added exponentially to our knowledge of how natural ecosystems work. It has also reminded us that predation is one of the dominant forces in all of nature, present in ecosystems worldwide over millions of years.

Bob Crabtree and Jennifer Sheldon note that predation by wolves is important to the integrity of the Yellowstone ecosystem, but we should realize that, before their return to Yellowstone’s northern range, 17 mountain lions there killed 611 elk per year, 60 grizzly bears killed 750 elk calves annually, and 400 coyotes killed between 1,100 and 1,400 elk per year.

P.J. White et al wrote that climate and human harvest account for most of the recent decline of the northern Yellowstone elk herd, coupled with the effects of five predators: wolves, grizzly bears, black bears, cougars, and coyotes. These are parts of a system unique in North America by its completeness.

Joel Berger et al demonstrated “a cascade of ecological events that were triggered by the local extinction of grizzly bears … and wolves from the southern greater Yellowstone ecosystem.” In about 75 years, moose in Grand Teton National Park erupted to five times the population outside the park, changed willow structure and density, and eliminated neotropical birds: gray catbirds and MacGillivray’s warblers.

Dan Tyers informs us that wolves haven’t eliminated moose from Yellowstone. Instead, burning of tens of thousands of acres of moose habitat in 1988 (mature forests with their subalpine fir) hit the moose population hard, and it won’t recover until the forests mature again.

Mark Hebblewhite and Doug Smith documented that wolves change species abundance, community composition, and physical structure of the vegetation, preventing overuse of woody plants like willow, and reducing severity of browsing on willows that provide nesting for songbirds. In Banff, songbird diversity and abundance were double in areas of high wolf densities, compared to that of areas with fewer wolves. Fewer browsers lead to more willows, providing habitat for beaver, a keystone species, which in turn create aquatic habitat for other plants and animals.

By reducing coyotes, which were consuming 85 percent of the production of mice in Yellowstone’s Lamar Valley, restored wolves divert more food to raptors, foxes, and weasels. By concentrating on killing vulnerable calf elk and very old female elk, wolves reduce competition for forage by post-breeding females, and enhance the nutrition of breeding-age females.

Wolves promote biological diversity, affecting 20 vertebrate species, and feeding many scavengers (ravens, magpies, pine martens, wolverines, bald eagles, gray jays, golden eagles, three weasel species, mink, lynx, cougar, grizzly bear, chickadees, Clark’s nutcracker, masked shrew and great grey owl). In Yellowstone, grizzly bears prevailed at 85 percent of encounters over carcasses, and they usurp nearly every kill made by wolves in Pelican Valley from March to October.

Some 445 species of beetle scavengers benefit from the largess of wolf-killed prey. In Banff and Yellowstone, no other predator feeds as many other species as do wolves. Wolf-killed elk carcasses enhance local levels of soil nutrients, adding 20 percent to 500 percent greater nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium.

Dan Stahler and his colleagues saw an average of four ravens on carcasses in Lamar Valley pre-wolf. Post-wolf, that increased to an average of 28, with as many as 135 seen on one carcass. Eagles seen on carcasses increased from an average of one per four carcasses to four per carcass.

P.J. White and Bob Garrott observed that, by lowering elk numbers, wolves may contribute to higher bison numbers; decreasing coyote populations result in higher pronghorn numbers. They also said wolves may ameliorate ungulate-caused landscape simplification.

Daniel Fortin and others saw that wolves may cause elk to shift habitat, using less aspen, and favoring songbirds that nest in the aspen.

Christopher Wilmers and all tell us that hunting by humans does not benefit scavengers the way wolf kills do. Carrion from wolf kills is more dispersed spatially and temporally than that from hunter kills, resulting in three times the species diversity on wolf kills versus hunter kills. Wolves subsidize many scavengers by only partly consuming their prey; they increase the time over which carrion is available, and change the variability in scavenge from a late winter pulse (winterkill) to all winter. They decrease the variability in year-to-year and month to-month carrion availability.

Chris Wilmers and Wayne Getz write that wolves buffer the effects of climate change. In mild winters, fewer ungulates die of winterkill, causing loss of carrion for scavengers. Wolves mitigate late-winter reduction in carrion by killing ungulates all year.

Mid-sized predators can be destructive in the absence of large keystone predators.  In the absence of wolves, pronghorn have been threatened with elimination by coyotes. Wolves have reduced coyotes and promoted survival of pronghorn fawns. Pronghorn does actually choose the vicinity of wolf dens to give birth, because coyotes avoid those areas, according to Douglas W. Smith.

Mark Hebblewhite reviewed the effects of wolves on population dynamics of large-ungulate prey, other effects on mountain ecosystems, sensitivity of wolf-prey systems to top-down and bottom-up management, and how this may be constrained in national park settings. Then he discussed the implications of his research on ecosystem management and long-term ranges of variation in ungulate abundance. He cites literature that suggests that the long-term stable state under wolf recovery will be low migrant elk density in Western montane ecosystems, noting that wolves may be a keystone species, without which ungulate densities increase, vegetation communities become overbrowsed, moose and beaver decline, and biodiversity is reduced. But as elk decline, aspen and willow regeneration are enhanced. In this context, wolf predation should be viewed as a critical component of an ecosystem management approach across jurisdictions.

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) could wipe out our elk and deer. Tom Hobbs writes that increasing mortality rates in diseased populations can retard disease transmission and reduce disease prevalence. Reduced lifespan, in turn, can compress the time interval when animals are infectious, thereby reducing the number of infections produced per infected individual. Results from simulations suggest that predation by wolves has the potential to eliminate CWD from an infected elk population.

Wildlife veterinarian Mark R. Johnson writes that wolves scavenge carrion, such as aborted bison or elk calves. By eating them, they may reduce the spread of Brucellosis to other bison or elk.

Scott Creel and John Winnie, Jr. report that wolves also cause elk to congregate in smaller groups, potentially slowing the spread of diseases that thrive among dense populations of ungulates.

John Duffield and others report that restoration of wolves has cost about $30 million, but has produced a $35.5 million annual net benefit to greater Yellowstone area counties, based on increased visitation by wolf watchers. Some 325,000 park visitors saw wolves in 2005. In Lamar Valley alone, 174,252 visitors observed wolves from 2000 to 2009, where wolves were seen daily in summers for nine of those ten years.

Wolves cause us to examine our values and attitudes. Paul Errington wrote, “Of all the native biological constituents of a northern wilderness scene, I should say that the wolves present the greatest test of human wisdom and good intentions.”

Aldo Leopold, father of game management in America, said, “Harmony with land is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left. That is to say, you cannot love game and hate predators. … The land is one organism.”

Leopold also pointed out that the first rule of intelligent tinkering with natural ecosystems was to keep all the pieces. Eliminating predators is counter to that advice. Wolves remind us to consider what is ethically and esthetically right in dealing with natural systems.

As Leopold wrote in his essay “The Land Ethic,” “A land ethic … does affirm (animals’) right to continued existence … in a natural state.” He concluded, “A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.”

Norman Bishop lives in Bozeman, Montana, and is a member of the advisory board of Living With Wolves, a group which raises awareness about wolves and their importance to healthy ecosystems. He worked for 36 years for the National Park Service, which included leading and supporting wolf restoration interpretation in Yellowstone National Park from 1985 to 1997. He was a reviewer of the 1990 and 1992 reports to Congress, “Wolves for Yellowstone?” and contributed to the 1994 Environmental Impact Statement, “The Reintroduction of Gray Wolves to Yellowstone National Park and Central Idaho.”

http://www.newwest.net/topic/article/what_good_are_wolves/C41/L41/

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Large carnivores promote healthy ecosystems by keeping browsers on edge

http://oregonstate.edu/terra/2007/04/high-alert/

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Photo: Courtesy OSU Terra The Power of Research

Video: YouTube: ripple wolves aspen

Posted in: gray wolf, biodiversity

Tags: gray wolf, apex predator, biodiversity

Published in: on July 26, 2012 at 3:02 am  Comments (16)  
Tags: , ,

Murie Family Schools Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation…

“Olaus and Mardy Murie by their home in front of Grand Tetons, 1953″

The Murie family knows a thing or two about conservation, they are icons of the wilderness movement, specifically Olaus and Adolph Murie and their wives Margaret and Louise.  These were remarkable people who cared deeply about wild places and stamped their indelible mark on conservation history. Their name has never been associated with anti-wolf rhetoric, quite the contrary.

“Poisoning and trapping of so-called predators and killing rodents, and the related insecticide and herbicide programs, are evidences of human immaturity. The use of the term ‘vermin’ as applied to so many wild creatures is a thoughtless criticism of nature’s arrangement of producing varied life on this planet. – Olaus Murie”

“Based in Grand Teton National Park, the Muries were active throughout the twentieth century. The Murie Family was strongly committed to maintaining the biodiversity of Jackson Hole and during the lifetimes of Mardy and Weezy helped establish the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance.

Olaus Murie was a talented artist and a pioneering field biologist for the U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey. He left federal service in 1945 to become the president of The Wilderness Society, which helped establish the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and was influential in the passage of Wilderness Act of 1964.

Adolph Murie, an ecologist, was a pioneering advocate of bio-diversity and was a major promoter of the Denali National Park.

Margaret Murie (married Olaus, 1924) helped bring about the passage of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, the greatest land preservation act in U.S. history, and was the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998.

Louise Murie (now MacLeod), a botanist, accompanied her husband Adolph (married 1932) on twenty-five expeditions to Mount McKinley (now Denali) National park. She served on the board of directors of the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance and the Murie Center.”….Wikipedia

 Donald  Murie , son of Olaus Murie, wrote an open letter to the  Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation  concerning their virulent anti-wolf rhetoric and use of the Murie name.

Donald Murie’s Letter to the RMEF:

“Dear Mr. Allen:

“Some years ago your organization established the Olaus Murie Award, given to indviduals who have done exemplary work establishing and protecting habitat, for elk and of necessity other animals and plants. The Murie family approved the use of my father’s name on an award of that nature. Olaus and his brother Adolph spent their lives studying wildlife and especially wildlife habitat. Their careful and meticulous studies led to publications and scientific papers that have been used by students and established scientists as a solid, proven foundation for further research and policy making.

“Now, we find that your organization has declared all-out war against wolves; unreasonable, with no basis in science at all, wholly emotional, cruel and anathema to the entire Murie family. We cannot condone this. It is in total opposition to the findings of careful independent research by hundreds of scientists. Wolves have always been a necessary part of a functional habitat for elk and other game animals. They have been re-introduced into areas where their absence has resulted in ecological imbalances. Now you are determined to exterminate them once again.

“We cannot accept this. We must regretfully demand that unless you have a major change in policy regarding wolves that you cancel the Olaus Murie Award. The Murie name must never be associated with the unscientific and inhumane practices you are advancing.”

“Sincerely,
Donald Murie”

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Press Release: Murie Family Cautions Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Over Anti-Wolf Rhetoric

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 18, 2012
Murie Family Cautions Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation over Anti-Wolf Rhetoric—America’s first family of natural history asks RMEF to return to science and reason
http://www.cascwild.org/rocky-mountain-elk-foundation-changes-name-of-conservation-prize-over-wolf-dispure/
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Predictably the RMEF decided to change the name of the Murie Award rather than back down from their hateful anti-wolf stance.
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Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Changes Name of Conservation Prize Over Wolf Dispute

July 19, 2012

Associated Press
HELENA, Mont. — The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation removed the name of Olaus J. Murie from a conservation award after the family of the man known as the father of modern elk management objected to what they called an all-out war against wolves.

http://www.cascwild.org/rocky-mountain-elk-foundation-changes-name-of-conservation-prize-over-wolf-dispure/

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I applaud the Murie family for speaking out with courage and conviction.  They deserve our support for standing up to the RMEF and schooling them on what true conservation is all about. It’s certainly not about demonizing an apex predator like the wolf. who’s only crime seems to be existing and breathing oxygen. Apparently wolves are not allowed to pursue their natural prey without permission of the RMEF. Does Mr. Allen believe elk belong to him and his organization? Inquiring minds want to know?
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Loss of top predators causing surge in smaller predators, ecosystem collapse

October 1, 2009

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“The caribou feeds the wolf, but it is the wolf who keeps the caribou strong.” -Keewation (Inuit) Proverb
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Photo: Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Posted in: Biodiversity, Wolf Wars

Tags: David Murie, Adolph Murie, Olaus Murie, Margaret Murie, Louise Murie, Murie Family, conservation, Wilderness Society, Jackson Hole, Arctic National Wildlife Preserve, biodiversity, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, wolf wars, David Allen

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