Senior Wolves Give Elk A Break

social security

Update: June 30, 2012

I posted this in 2009, just as the first wolf hunts were underway in Montana and Idaho. I believed that if we provided  fish and game managers with scientific fact about the detrimental effects of wolf hunting it might have some effect. How naive I was! The only thing they care about is pleasing two groups of people (hunters and ranchers) and “managing” wolves down to a shadow population of 100 to 150 animals per state.

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November 5, 2009

It turns out wolves age just like people and according to wolf researcher, Daniel MacNulty, by age four, wolves are considered old. This insight into the life span of wolves could have far-reaching implications concerning “managing” them.   The older the wolf, the less threat they are to elk, due to their reduced physical stamina.

The teenagers and young adults of the pack do most of the leg work chasing down prey, while the older wolves are important at the end of the chase, with their larger bodies and heftier builds, they help youngsters with the take down.  It all makes perfect sense.  Dr. MacNulty states hunting wolves to reduce their numbers may backfire.

“It’s been shown in other hunted populations of wolves that hunting skews the population toward younger age classes,” he explains. And, as his research shows, that could spell more deaths, not fewer, for the elk.

The reason hunting pushes a population’s age structure downward is because being hunted is like playing Russian roulette. If, starting early in life, every member of a society had to play Russian roulette regularly, not too many would live to a ripe old age, he says.”

But wolf supporters don’t really believe wolf hunts are about “the science.”  Still I’m hopeful Dr.MacNulty’s research will open a few eyes.

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Washed-up wolves

Surprising discoveries about aging wolves and their effects on elk

washed up wolves

The elk-hunting skills of wolves decline significantly with age, a University of Minnesota study shows.

Photo: Douglas Dance

By Deane Morrison

Contrary to their fearsome, folk tale-rooted image, wolves just aren’t all that good as predators. To bring down big prey, they have nothing but speed and teeth–no claws that can rip flesh, no massive paws to kayo their quarry.

Now, a University of Minnesota-led study of wolves in Yellowstone National Park shows how even that modest ability soon ebbs away. Daniel MacNulty and his colleagues found that the wolves were in their hunting prime at the ages of 2 and 3, but then their skills deteriorated steadily. They lived, on average, till age 6.

Writing in the September 23, 2009 issue of Ecology Letters, MacNulty, a postdoctoral researcher in the University’s Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, and his colleagues reported that the higher the proportion of wolves older than 3 in the park, the lower the rate at which they kill elk, their main source of food. The findings run counter to a belief, held by many ecologists, that wild predators maintain their physical skills as long as they live.

But the study “shows that aging impairs the ability of the wolves to catch elk,” says MacNulty, “The data connect aging with an important ecological process, namely predation.”

MacNulty has followed the Yellowstone wolves since their reintroduction to the park in 1995. He says the lowered hunting ability of older wolves may afford some protection to the elk, which would fare worse if all the wolves were spring chickens.

“For example, when 22 percent of the wolves in Yellowstone were 3 or older, the kill rate was 0.4 elk per pack per day,” says MacNulty. “If the older wolves were 52 percent of the population, the kill rate dropped to 0.22 elk per pack per day.”

In general, for every 10 percent rise in the proportion of wolves older than 3, the Yellowstone wolf population saw a decline in the kill rate of 10 to 15 percent, he says.

“… [W]hen 22 percent of the wolves in Yellowstone were 3 or older, the kill rate was 0.4 elk per pack per day. If the older wolves were 52 percent of the population, the kill rate dropped to 0.22 elk per pack per day.”

MacNulty has also documented the decline of individual aging wolves’ hunting skills. For example:

“Wolf number 21 in the Druid Peak pack lived to about 9,” he says. “Video of 21 over his lifetime showed him slowing down when chasing elk as he neared the end of life.”
As the geezer wolves lose their edge, the study suggests that young adults in the pack shoulder more of the workload and share their kills. This may provide aging members of the pack with a lupine version of social security.

Why wolf hunting may backfire

The number of elk in Yellowstone has declined in recent years, and many believe wolves are the main cause, MacNulty says. But he notes that drought, which has reduced the supply of plants elk eat, and predation of elk calves by grizzly bears have also probably contributed.

Montana legalized wolf hunting after the animal was taken off the endangered species list in 2008. But hunting of wolves won’t necessarily help the elk, and not just because only a few wolves have been taken so far, MacNulty says.

“It’s been shown in other hunted populations of wolves that hunting skews the population toward younger age classes,” he explains. And, as his research shows, that could spell more deaths, not fewer, for the elk.

The reason hunting pushes a population’s age structure downward is because being hunted is like playing Russian roulette. If, starting early in life, every member of a society had to play Russian roulette regularly, not too many would live to a ripe old age, he says.

Currently, MacNulty is working with a colleague at Michigan Technological University to “nail down,” or quantify, the effect on elk of wolf management that involves hunting. 

“We’re modeling wolf-elk dynamics and looking at how changes in wolf age structure affect elk numbers,” he says.

http://www1.umn.edu/news/features/2009/UR_CONTENT_143264.html

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Photo: Courtesy Douglas Dance

Categories posted in: gray wolf,  wolf recovery, wolves under fire

Tags: gray wolf, wolf recovery, wolf research, senior wolves, MacNulty

Wolves ARE The True Lords Of Nature!

It’s important to remember why we need wolves!

This was one of my early posts in the fall of 2009. Wolves were being hunted in Idaho and Montana for the first time since their near extermination in the lower 48.

October 29, 2009 

Wolves effect their surroundings and bring life to the lands they inhabit. For sixty years elk browsed the meadows of the North Fork of the Flathead, in Montana. Their adversary, Canis Lupus, who had chased them through time, was gone, hunted to extinction in the West.

Then the wolf came home to it’s native habitat and dispersed the elk. This brought back the aspen and willow, young shoots no longer trampled under the complacent elk’s hooves. With the aspen came the songbirds and other wildlife.

Once more the circle was complete with the return of the great canine, the wolf.

 “Aspen ecosystems are considered some of the finest and richest songbird habitat on the continent, second only to river-bottom riparian zones. Remove the wolf, and you remove the songbirds. Remove the songbirds, and the bugs move in. Everything changes, top to bottom, right down to the dirt”…..Cristina Eisenberg,  Oregon State University researcher

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Wolves Increase Biodiversity And Greatly Benefit The Ecosystems They Inhabit

Matt Skoglund Wildlife Advocate, Livingston, Montana

Posted October 26, 2009 in Saving Wildlife and Wild Places

Wolves matter.

They lead to more songbirds.  Better trout habitat.  More game birds.  Less insects.  Better soil.  Fewer coyotes.  Wilder elk.  More aspen trees.

Wolves, in essence, are key to a healthy landscape.

So says biologist Christina Eisenberg in a fascinating Missoulian article on the effect of wolves — and their absence — on an ecosystem.

Eisenberg has been studying the top-to-bottom effect of wolves — called a “trophic cascade” — in Glacier National Park for years.  She’s also been researching ecosystems near St. Mary’s, Montana, and in Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta, Canada.

“Each study site is about the same size, and each has a similarly large elk population, native to an aspen-based winter range, and each has the same general density of cougars and bears.”  The difference between the sites is the number of resident wolves:  St. Mary’s has none, Waterton some, and Glacier many.

Her findings on the much heated debate over wolves and elk mirror what others have found:  there are plenty of elk in the Northern Rockies, but the return of wolves has made the elk behave again like wild elk:

The North Fork, Eisenberg said, is “full of wolves,” and has been for 20 years now.  It’s also full of elk – as many as 14 elk per square kilometer in this meadow, where the wolf den site is located.  Elk scat litters the ground not 20 yards from the den.

Clearly, the wolves aren’t eating all the elk.  But aside from the tracks and the scat and the bones and the antlers, there are no elk to be seen.

“They’ve totally changed their behavior,” Eisenberg said.  “For 60 years we’ve become used to complacent elk.  These elk aren’t complacent.  They’re on high alert.”

From a browse standpoint, that means elk eat a bit and move on, eat a bit and move on, never standing in one place long enough to eat a tree down to its roots.  And from a human standpoint, it means hunters see far fewer elk even as state wildlife officials insist Montana has more deer and elk than it’s had for years.

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Hunters, of course, prefer elk that aren’t quite so wily, but trophic cascades work both ways in wildlife management.  Remove the wolves, and elk are easier to find.  But then coyote populations explode, eating their way through the local game-bird population.  Enhance one hunting opportunity, and you affect another.

And from a bigger viewpoint than just elk, Eisenberg has found that wolves increase biodiversity and greatly benefit the overall health of the areas they inhabit:

Remove the wolves, she said, and you lose the birds.

Remove the wolves, she said, and the coyotes fill the niche.  The coyotes eat the ground squirrels, and so the meadows don’t get “plowed,” and soil productivity declines.

Remove the wolves, she said, and the deer eat the river-bottom willows, and the bull trout lose both their shade and their food, as insects no longer fall from overhanging brush.

Remove the wolves, she said, “and everything changes.”

Why is this so noteworthy?

Because the places with greatest biodiversity are the places most resilient, most able to adapt to, say, changing climate.

And Eisenberg wisely thinks her — and others’ — findings should guide wolf management.

Wolf populations aren’t recovered with 12 breeding pairs, or 15, or 20, Eisenberg said.  They’re recovered when there are enough wolves and other top-end predators to maximize biodiversity.  

Her findings are important, and they’re timely, as wolves are being gunned down all over Idaho and Montana right now.

In her research and in this article, Eisenberg simply and unequivocally points out a critical fact that’s been lost in the recent debate over the wolf hunts:

Wolves matter.

http://switchboard.nrdc.org/blogs/mskoglund/wolves_increase_biodiversity_a.html

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Tracking science: Biologist’s findings show forest diversity, health influenced by wolves

Wolf%20pack

http://www.missoulian.com/lifestyles/territory/article_3ec9fc54-c01f-11de-bf16-001cc4c002e0.html

Photo: first people

Photo: wolf wallpaper

Categories posted in: biodiversity, wolf recovery, gray wolf,  Glacier National Park

Tags: wolf recovery, gray wolf,  biodiversity

Manifest Destiny and Ken Salazar

I recently stumbled across Barbara Clarke’s blog, she operates Dreamcatcher, a wild horse sanctuary. Her excellent post speaks about Ken Salazar and his attitude toward wolves, wild horses and other wildlife. I thought it was worthy to repost her take on why the Secretary of the Interior, who is charged with the care of our wild lands and the animals who inhabit them, is practicing the opposite of good stewardship.

It was Ken Salazar, a fifth generation rancher, appointed by the Obama administration, that delisted the gray wolf in the Northern Rockies, which caused the death of hundreds of wolves in state sponsored wolf hunts. Over five hundred wolves died in the Northern Rockies in 2009 and more brutal hunts are planned if Judge Molloy doesn’t relist them.

It’s Ken Salazar who is directing BLM to round-up our mustangs, chasing them with helicopters in the blazing heat, literally frightening some of them to death, than squeezing them into holding pens (horse jail). Why is this being done?  Barbara Clarke answers that question.

by Barbara Clarke
February 8, 2010

“In a recent documentary about the problems involved with the reintroduction of the nearly extinct Mexican wolf, a rancher was quoted as saying “we don’t want them”. No science. No statistics. No reason or clear argument. Just “we don’t want them”.

That statement is the crux of the whole problem facing animals in the west today and the basis for Ken Salazar’s opinions as to how to manage the dwindling herds of wild horses. The ranching community still believes in the notion of manifest destiny: the right to claim the west for human endeavors.

And this is no small notion. For Salazar, a product of five generations of ranching, the belief that the west belongs to ranchers and by extension cattle, is deep and pervasive. For over one hundred fifty years the livestock industry, by sweat and blood, has clawed its way across the continent in search of the ever needed forage for hungry cattle and sheep. This neo-exploration was and still is backed by the government through subsidies and ridiculously low grazing fees.

And even though the prairies and rangelands had once supported millions of grazing wildlife including buffalo and mustangs, by the beginning of the twentieth century the once lush rangeland west of the Mississippi had been reduced to stubble, with native grasses obliterated and alarming damage done to waterways.

Anything and anyone that threatened this quest for manifest destiny or was seen as competitors for forage, was soon eliminated. Native Americans were pushed off of ancestral lands and whole species were slaughtered in the name of protecting livestock and grazing. Wolves, coyotes, eagles, bears, ground squirrels and wild horses all found themselves in the cross-hairs of powerful weapons with the full support of our nation’s leaders.

The American government wanted the west. The ranchers gave it to them. And in no small way this has made cattle and all the issues surrounding them, politically untouchable.

So it is no surprise that with the appointment of a fifth generation rancher to head the Department of the Interior, the president, who espouses change – but is granting a $26 million dollar increase in budget for Salazar to remove horses – has opened the door to an increase in the agonies that accompany manifest destiny. Wolves, coyotes, ground squirrels and wild horses are fighting for their very lives.

Wild horses, which have a clear fossil and DNA linage to our continent, are being pushed off of lands set aside for them by congress in unprecedented numbers in the dubious name of saving them from starvation or protecting eco-systems. Yet observers at roundups continue to see healthy horses being captured, thriving rangeland and most notably, no decrease in the number of cattle allowed to graze the same supposedly sensitive areas.

This rush to sweep the wild horses off the rangeland has the full support of Salazar. And why not? When he looks at the mustang, he sees them through a hundred and fifty year lens of ranching. Wild horses are competitors for forage, inhabit areas wanted for mining, the powerfully backed Ruby Pipeline and California Heliostat projects, and do not generate hunting fees. So Salazar wants them removed. But not only removed, he wants them transplanted back east……somewhere, on pseudo-sanctuaries, at a cost of $96 million dollars, where he believes people will actually pay to watch once wild horses eat grass all day.

His plan, therefore, to move them to areas in the east, is not surprising, nor is his revisionist view of wild horse history. It is the final chapter in the long saga of claiming the west. Soon the horses, like the buffalo and the wolf and so many other beings, will be mere shadows of the species they once were. And our president, and his appointees, can go down in history as those who stole the magnificence of the west from our children.”

http://dreamcatcher.typepad.com/my_weblog/

Photo: Manifest Destiny Courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Posted in: Wolf Wars, biodiversity

Tags: Ken Salazar, gray wolves, wild horses, Manifest Destiny

Waiting Game: Fate Of Wolves In The Northern Rockies?

It’s been over  a year since wolves were delisted in the Northern Rockies, yet it seems like decades. Almost immediately, Montana and Idaho were lining up wolf trophy hunts. Wolf advocates have always been told the states would be reasonable managing wolves, that they “loved wolves”. Well if this is love, it’s TOUGH LOVE.  500 wolves died in the Northern Rockies in 2009 and Wildlife Services is still killing them for agribusiness. It’s been a terrible year.

Wolf supporters watched in horror as wolves were hunted for the first time since their reintroduction. One minute they were a protected species and the next they were target practice. 

It was shocking in it’s swiftness but were we all so naive to think the states could “manage” wolves? State game agencies have never been good at managing predators.  Predators compete for the game hunters want to kill. Hunters are state game agencies’  life blood. They pay licensing fees which fill state game agency coffers.  Why would the welfare of wolves ever trump that relationship? It wouldn’t and it hasn’t.

From the Sierra Club:

“We have consistently maintained that wolves in the northern Rockies are not ready to be removed from the Endangered Species list,” said Sierra Club representative Bob Clark. “Removing federal protections for wolves has left them at the mercy of aggressive state plans that treat wolves as pests rather than a valuable wildlife resource.”

On Tuesday, June  15th, wolves went to court to gain their protections back. The lawsuit to relist wolves, brought by fourteen environmental groups, was finally moving forward.  Judge Molloy was ready to hear oral agruments from both sides of the wolf  issue, at the Russell Smith Federal Courthouse in Missoula,  Montana.

Of course there were wolf protesters outside the courthouse waving their anti-wolf signs. And of course they were on the front page of  local newspapers. The anti-wolf crowd gets most of the headlines. I guess hateful rhetoric sells. But make no mistake wolves have many, many supporters in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming, Wolves have supporters around this country and the world. We might not be as vocal but we are no less passionate about this incredible amd persecuted animal, the gray wolf.

The courtroom was packed,  a brief recess was called when a legal student collapsed while presenting part of the case for The Greater Yellowstone Coalition.

The hearing didn’t last very long,  It was all over in a few hours. 

I want to personally thank Doug Honnold, the lead Earthjustice attorney, for doing such a terrific job for wolves in their dark hour!!

Judge Molloy stated he’d rule “as quickly as I can”.  I hope it comes soon. Montana and Idaho have admitted they are aggressively going after wolves to reduce their numbers in 2010/2011. This is called “wolf love”?  It’s how they show their love for wolves by killing them?  Who do they think they’re kidding?

Both states want to significantly increase their wolf hunt quotas, Montana proposes a wolf archery season and back country wolf rifle season. Idaho may be adding calling, baiting and trapping to their “toolbox” of tricks. I shudder to think what will happen if wolves aren’t relisted.

And we can’t forget the hardcore wolf haters, that love to stir things up. One wolf hating website discussed hunters killing wolves with Xylitol, a popular sweetner, that’s deadly to canines. I guess they don’t care if  pet dogs die along with the wolves they hate so much. Seriously, what is wrong with people?  Do you see what wolves are up against in the Northern Rockies? They cannot survive here without ESA protection.

So now we wait.

The future of the Northern Rockies gray wolf  hangs in the balance.

 
Posted: Tuesday, 15 June 2010 8:46AM

Fate of Rocky Mountain wolves to be decided

Sierra Club

http://www.keci.com/pages/7470875.php?contentType=4&contentId=6288504

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Photos: courtesy kewl wallpaper

Posted in: Wolf Delisting Lawsuit, Howling For Justice, Wolf Wars

Tags: Judge Molloy, ESA, Doug Honnold,, gray wolf/canis lupus, wolf persecution

Wolves Howling Methow Valley, Washington

Listen to the Lookout Pack in Washington’s Methow Valley.  It’s music to my ears. 

“We listened for a voice crying in the wilderness. And we heard the jubilation of wolves!” -Durwood L. Allen

“When Conservation Northwest Executive Director, Mitch Friedman, his children, and nephew joined state and federal biologists to check in on the Lookout Pack, Washington’s first pack in over 70 years, they were treated to quite a chorus!”

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Here’s The First Litter of Lookout Pack Pups Caught On Remote Camera  August 12, 2008 (unfortunately only one survived)

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But all was not lost.  What you are hearing in the first video is their second litter born in 2009!! AND the discovery of a second wolf pack in Pend Oreille County.

Lookout Pack has new litter; wolves confirmed in Pend Oreille County

By Joyce Campbell, Methow Valley News
July 15, 2009
 
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Lookout Pack observed moving about its territory

By Joyce Campbell, Methow Valley News

January 1, 2010

http://methowvalleynews.com/story.php?id=540

Posted in: Washington wolves, wolf recovery, biodiversity

Tags: wolf howls, Lookout Pack, gray wolf/canis lupus, wolf recovery

Hunters kill 20 wolves in first Swedish hunt in 45 years

More bad news, this time from Sweden.  For the first time in forty-five years, Swedish wolves are being hunted. Hunters killed 20 wolves out of the 27 wolf quota, on the first day of the hunt.  How incredibly sad. To my fellow wolf supporters in Sweden, my heart goes out to you.

Sweden’s wolves number a little over 200 animals. Yet this tiny wolf population is being hunted.  20 wolves are gone.  For what? 

Wolf persecution is global!!

We have just begun to fight…….John Paul Jones

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“Hunter Sune Johansson weights a female wolf after it was shot”

Hunters kill 20 wolves in first Swedish hunt in 45 years

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.227e6a4e11ba39c08630e5729d693330.a81&show_article=1

Posted in: Swedish wolves

Tags: Swedish wolf hunt, gray wolf/canis lupus, trophy hunting wolves

Published in: on January 2, 2010 at 11:51 pm  Comments (6)  
Tags: , ,

Montana FWP Thinks 2009 Wolf Hunt ‘Good Day For Montana’

 

I was shocked by the headline in the Missoulian, “FWP says 2009 wolf hunt ‘a good day for Montana’, quoting Carolyn Sime, Montana state wolf coordinator.  FWP even released a report on the hunt.  Apparently, the devil is in the details. 

Of course they’re going to be thrilled with themselves, they planned the hunt mere months after gray wolves were delisted. What are they going to say? We did a miserable job and 203 wolves are now dead in Montana between the hunt and wolves killed by Wildlife Services? 

The wolf population in the state, before all the killing started, was approx. 450-500 wolves. Is anyone considering the Montanans that are wholly against the wolf hunts? That we consider this slaughter plain and simple in the name of hunting and ranching. That over FORTY PERCENT of Montana’s wolves are dead and Wildlife Services isn’t done yet?  There are kill orders out on 22 more wolves from five packs, if they haven’t been killed already. No, the Montana hunt and shadow Wildlife Service hunt was not a wonderful success. FIVE HUNDRED NORTHERN ROCKIES WOLVES ARE DEAD.

This statement from the article caught my eye. “Others worried about the potential to wipe out entire packs.” How many packs of wolves has Wildlife Services taken out this year? I can name the Sage Creek Pack, the Big Hole Pack the Centennial pack AND they are gunning for the Mitchell Mountain, Battlefield and Pintler packs. Visit my wolf pack memorial page to see how busy they’ve been. Wildlife Services gunned down twenty seven members of the Hog Heaven Pack last year. TWENTY SEVEN WOLVES. Nine entire packs were wiped out in Montana in 2008 by WS on the orders of FWP. Are people living in dream land concerning what is happening to wolves in Montana and the Northern Rockies in general?? We didn’t need a Montana wolf hunt. WS killed more wolves this year then the hunts. The combination of the two was a double whammy to wolves. This is why State Fish and Game Agencies shouldn’t be managing wolves.

It’s a grim time for Montanans who care about wolves and it’s certainly a disaster for wolves. What in the world is there to celebrate or be happy about concerning wolves?

Posted in: Wildlife Services War on Wildlife, Montana wolf hunt, Wolf Wars, aerial gunning of wolves

Tags: Wildlife Services, Montana wolf hunt, gray wolf/canis lupus, wolves or livestock

A Quiet Meditation For Wolf Revealed

honoring the hunted 7

My friend, Cindy Campbell,  shared her meditation with wolf and has given me permission to share it with my readers.  During the past weeks of chaos we all need to remember to slow down and reflect on life.  Her experience may bring us a little peace and enlightenment.  HOWLS!!

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For My Fellow Wolf Admirers,

  The Wolf Meditation which took place during the twilight hour on November 15 was an enlightening and rewarding experience.  The sky was crystal clear, the stars shown brightly and the air was crisp, measuring only 5 degrees. I had a small campfire which kept me perfectly warm (along with down blankets and a few layers of clothing!).  For the first 10 minutes I took in my surroundings. The sky, the fire, the crystal reflections of the frost on the trees and bushes.  I immediately knew I was transforming into a different space and it felt very comfortable and inviting.  I have always believed the time between dark and light was magical, we just don’t make an effort to go there very often.  The silence was consuming as well.  I did wonder about night visitors and what they might be thinking ie: Great Grey, Raccoon and Coyote.  Then I remembered, they already knew exactly what I were doing and why!
The meditation itself started at 5:30 am and lasted until 6:15 am when I opened my eyes. (After I went back inside around 6:30 I immediately wrote out the message I received during the meditation). At this point the dawn was just starting to peek over the mountains in front of me.  The silhouette, of the tall wise pine trees at the top of the hill, was taking shape.  I stoked the fire, although I must say I stayed very warm and toasty throughout.  What I did next was very powerful.  I slowly dripped the Snake River water onto the fire and imaged lifting and cleansing the spirit of one wolf, then another, then another.  I brought the wolves that we all know and have come to love, I brought wolves killed which we knew nothing about, and I brought wolves who will need cleansing over the next 3 or 4 months.  All the wolves felt healthy, strong, beautiful and forever.  I then asked for forgiveness from the original Wolf Clan for the ruthless way we ended their lives. I promised our support to keep fighting to make sure things become fair and balanced between us and our Brother Wolf. I admitted many of us understand this is not currently the case. As the droplets of the cold clean water hit the fire, it sizzled loudly and put out a small puff of smoke.  It was in that moment I felt a loving presence all around me. I knew I wasn’t alone.
By now the day sky was taking over the night sky and it was time to go back into the warmth of my home and write out the important message I received.  Following is that message.An Alpha female wolf will be born, she will endure a very rough start into this world.  She’ll grow into a beautiful wolf with very distinct markings.  She will be a gray wolf with predominately white feet and tail.   She will have a darker face with a visible black marking on her forehead.  Her Alpha male will be black and he’ll be the larger of the two.  They will live where wolves are hunted on a regular basis.  One of their litters, the second they have, will consist of thirteen pups! Four will die, nine will live through the first months, seven will live to adulthood, and two will have life changing experiences which will turn upside down the entire concept of how humans and wolves walk side by side from here on out.  It will be a revolutionary change. This litter will be the tell all of our progress in helping wolf survive in these small pockets of wilderness.  This family will become known in 4-1/2 – 5 years (2013-14).  The Alpha female will carry the genes of the Cottonwood Alpha female killed during this years hunt. She will teach the 2 special pups from her second litter something new, different and powerful.  It will take the original Wolf Clan that many generations to get the information correct so that it can be safely and effectively passed down.  I got the impression these game changing wolves will be a sister and brother team.

At this point I waited intently for more information but quickly realized the message was complete, for now.  I clearly knew I was alone again.

As I have learned through my work as a animal communicator, it could be tempting for me to start interpreting the message, but I will not. I merely hold the position of messenger. The wolves will fill in the rest as they see fit.  Our job now is to stay attentive and to always be listening.

Thank you to everyone who took a few minutes, sometime during that day to tap into the well-being of our fellow living being – Brother Wolf.

With Love, Illuminating Light and Wolf Howls All Around,
Cindy

Photo: Wikimedia Commons
Posted in: Canis lupus, Let Wolves Live In Peace
Tags:  gray wolf, gray wolf/Canis lupus
Published in: on November 29, 2009 at 3:34 am  Comments (5)  
Tags:

Imnaha Wolf Pack….Eastern Oregon!!

Here is positive wolf news in an otherwise grim season. I wanted to post this video last week but was sidetracked by Idaho extending the wolf hunt and the predator derby.

ODFW caught the ten member Imnaha Wolf pack walking single file through the eastern Oregon woods with at least six pups!! Leading the pack is alpha female B-300.

(“This video taken by ODFW on Nov. 12, 2009in the Imnaha Wildlife Management Unit (east of Joseph, Ore. in Wallowa County) shows at least 10 wolves make up a pack that ODFW has been monitoring since June 2008. The video was taken from an adjacent ridge across a canyon and shows a mixture of gray and black individual wolves moving upslope.”)

Eastern Oregon wolves again star in video, this time with youngsters

By Abby Haight, The Oregonian

November 19, 2009, 6:00PM

http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2009/11/eastern_oregon_wolves_again_st.html

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Posted in: Oregon wolves, wolf recovery, biodiversity

Tags: wolf recovery, gray wolf,

Published in: on November 23, 2009 at 3:38 am  Comments (4)  
Tags: ,

“Lords of Nature” Playing in Columbia Falls, Mt. This Thursday

Photo: SigmaEye Flicker

Hi Everyone,

The must see video “Lords of Nature”, is coming to Columbia Falls, Mt. this Thursday @ 7pm.  This is the premiere film on predators, if you love wolves, grizzlies and moutain lions, this is for you!!

Flathead Valley, this is your chance to view this incredible film. The event is being sponsored by Defenders of Wildlife.  Here are the details.

What:

Lords of Nature Film Premiere followed by a Q & A Session

When:

Thursday, November 19th from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Where:

Glacier Discovery Square
540 Nucleus Avenue
Columbia Falls, MT 59912

HOWLS!! 

http://howlingforjustice.wordpress.com/2009/09/23/lords-of-nature-life-in-a-land-of-great-predators/

Category posted in: gray wolf, wolf recovery, grizzly bear, North Fork

Tags: gray wolf, endandered species act, Glacier National Park, biodiversity

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