More Pics of Wenaha Wolf Pups!

Here are three more pics from ODFW of the pups. I don’t agree with all the handling? Not sure why they have to capture the pups, it’s so invasive and I’m sure the parents were fairly upset. But we can’t pass up pics of the pups, they are adorable. Don’t like the ear tag though, it reminds me of tagging calves.

Wenaha Wolf Pup Being Weighed

Wehaha Wolf Pup Being Released 

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Photos: Courtesy ODFW

Posted in: Oregon wolves

Tags: Wenaha wolf pups, ODFW, Oregon, gray wolf

Published in: on August 25, 2010 at 10:21 pm  Comments (16)  
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16 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Very cute Nabeki!
    Do you think the ear tag (its so obvious) is to deter hunters from going after them?
    Also b/c collars malfunction (as we seen with the male Alpha wolf) maybe this is a easier way to visualize/sight them for study? Anyway very happy for the pics♥

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    • No CW, it’s not to deter hunters. Basically each ear tag has a number. So they log their weight, overall health, their pack, etc…to identify the wolf down the road, for instance if it comes in contact with people. Or if it’s found dead.

      It’s just not necessary, wolves are handled far too much, they don’t need radio collars or tags, they just need to be left alone but fish and game treat them like they are tagging calves or something.

      N.

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      • I agree with you Nabeki, but I believe that collaring and tagging wolves is a good idea because what if hunters or ranchers or whoever poaches them and the wolves just disappear and we have no idea why? I would like to think there aren’t people like this, but I have to face reality and realize there are a lot of wolf haters out there who don’t care about killing wolves illegally even if there is such a small population like in Oregon. Other than that reason, I don’t like them being collared or tagged. I think some of the reason they do this is because if these collared wolves sometime down the line take livestock, they will be easier to find by ws and killed.

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      • Jon…I think there are just a few select wolves that should be collared. Certainly the Mexican grays because they are so critically endangered but even in their case it’s a double edge sword. Any wolf with a collar should not have its collar coordinates handed over to ranchers or anyone but USFWS. No more collaboration. I don’t think Yellowstone wolves need to be collared for the most part. Maybe a study now and then. Besides being dangerous for the wolves it’s also unhealthy. Yellowstone wolves battle mange and the mites can hide under the collars making the itching unbearable. There are many ways to count wolves and I would rather take the chance of not knowing exactly how many there are then have them constantly handled and many times the collars are used to track and kill them and their families.

        N.

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      • Did anyone hear about this yet? i am sure you have Nabeki.

        http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38836388/ns/us_news-environment/

        I know it’s funny when you have these people not wanting wolves in their states and calling wolves non native, but aren’t cattle non native animals? lol The hypocrisy.

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      • Jon…I’m going to do a post on this soon. It’s the ultimate hypocrisy, most of the wolf recovery area is public land. Many of the ranchers are tenants on the American people’s land and the wolves land. How dare theu think they’re more important then wolves on the brink of extinction? Talk about chutpah.

        N.

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  2. They are so cute Nabeki.
    Thanks for the extra photos i wish always be healthy and free.
    I am sad about usfws and the people who enter on they world and tag them but i see the other view i see they are alive and that makes me happy..

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    • Yes they are so cute Vasileios and it’s great to see them but I wonder if all the intrusion into their lives doesn’t somehow change them?

      N.

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      • I Agree with you Nabeki.
        In Wolfs life people presence is something always bad i respect them and most of us want to treat them like wild animals. Always stay at distance and observe them but in my heart i want so badly to be close to them just for one moment just to say to them who much i care and love them with all my heart. Long live to the Wolfs long live to my Brothers and Sisters…

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  3. I found a very good letter from marc Cooke who posts on here. Hope you don’t mind if I post a link to it Marc.

    http://missoulian.com/news/opinion/mailbag/article_f0e2852a-b117-11df-b355-001cc4c002e0.html

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    • Jon, No problem…Hope everyone was in agreement.

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    • Jon…..Marc did an excellent job on his letter.

      N.

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  4. As much as I love seeing pics of wolf pups, I have to agree that I think these pups are getting far too much handling by humans. It looks like the one in the top pic has been drugged maybe. Unfortunately, the more wolves can stay away from humans, the safe they will be. I worry that any handling by humans possibly might make them more trusting, and therefore more vulnerable.

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    • Hi SoCalWolfGal…..I believe they trap them, then sedate them and perform all the tasks, then wake them up and send them on their way. It has to be traumatic for the little ones and I’m sure their parents are beside themselves. I hate the ear tags. I don’t like em in calves and dislike them more in wolves. John brought up possible injury from those tags, like infection or what if it gets ripped off while the pups are playing or fighting?

      N.

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  5. Parvo virus can be spread from dog to dog or from dog to wolf by any human who has had contact with a parvo infected dog or its feces. The virus can be spread by feces or contaminated hair on boots, clothing, hands or even automoble tires. The virus can remain infective for up to 6 months in the environment. Humans are one of the main vectors in the spread of this disease.
    There are four people in the photo weighing the wolf pup and one taking the photo. None of them are wearing any kind of protection. They are wearing the same clothes and boots that they wear all of the time.
    Contaminated dog hair on the red sweater could easily spread parvo to the wolves. Old dog poop on any of the ten boots worn by the mob in these photos could prove fatal to this wolf pack.

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    • Great observations Larry, you are so right. Very poor protocal all around. No wonder wolves become infected with these diseases. Isn’t this Biology 101?

      N.

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