Yellowstone Bison Slaughter Given Green Light…..

UPDATE: February 16, 2011

Schweitzer halts bison slaughter

http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/news/article_891762e0-3979-11e0-a85a-001cc4c002e0.html

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2006 Bison Slaughter (BFC): Yellowstone Kills 758 of Last 4000 Wild Bison [Jan ’06]…from BFC

2008 Bison Slaughter: Yellowstone Bison Being Shipped to Slaughterhouse

“On Mar. 18, another 62 bison were loaded onto cattle trucks and sent to slaughter. This video, taken by Tim Stevens of the National Parks Conservation Association, shows federal and state agents loading these majestic beast like cattle.”…from GreaterYellowstone

2008 Bison Slaughter: “Montana Dept of Livestock and Yellowstone National Park are engaging in inhumane and cruel corralling of wild buffalo from their safe haven of Yellowstone. These buffalo are too large for the alleyways they are prodded through, tear skin from their bodies, rip horns from their heads, flip over, get trampled and die through this process. Get involved. Take action. Write your Senators, Congressmen and Yellowstone. Keep up with the latest through Buffalo Field Campaign”…from buffalomatter

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Do you want to see this? Bison grazing in the Lamar Valley.


Or This?

From The Buffalo Field Campaign: Two calves at risk for injury – Captured bison in first holding pen. 08-JUN-2007

“The cropped photo was taken soon after the group of approximately 40 bison including calves had been hazed and herded into the capture facility’s holding pen on National Forest land just east of Yellowstone National Park. This photo is yet another documenting of the fact that hazing and penning is risky for bison calves. When Yellowstone National Park was created, its western and northern borders cut through natural areas wherein bison move freely and forage. The capture facility is near habitat quite natural for the buffalo and stands as the major reason they migrate from the Park in winter and spring. These not large locales are mostly in National Forest adjoining Yellowstone, and should be codified as bison sanctuary.”….from the BFC
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Yellowstone’s bison lost in court, a federal judge cleared the way for 217 bison, who tested positive for brucellosis, to be sent to slaughter, out of the 525 that have been penned so far. That’s Monday’s count. It could go higher. Environmental groups are expected to appeal this decision. The bison’s only hope lies with the appeal.

The bison are hungry and leaving the park for their lower elevation feeding grounds. That’s what they’ve been doing for thousands of years before there was a Yellowstone National Park or The Montana Department of Livestock or cattle. Cattle are a non-native species that trample native grasses, pollute watersheds and are the cause of untold suffering. Wolves and bison are being sacrificed on the “sacred cow altar”.

The videos show what shipping our iconic bison to slaughter looks like. Why is the guy smiling while prodding bison, in the third video @ 1:14?

These videos from 2006 and 2008 are gut wrenching to watch. But please share them with everyone you know who cares about wildlife. As unpleasant as they are, they need to be seen by as many people as possible. How many more years are we going to allow this to go on? Isn’t it time to put these archaic, brutal policies to bed? Those bison are descended from the last of the great buffalo herds, that once roamed this country by the millions and we’re letting the cattle industry kill them.  Why???

Slaughtering Yellowstone’s bison is a tragedy that plays out year after year yet nobody has been able to stop this madness. “Is this the Year of  the Bison”?  Will it stop this year? Not according to U.S. District Judge Charles C. Lovell.

“Distasteful as the lethal removal may be to some, it is clearly one of the foremost management tools – time honored – necessarily utilized to protect the species, the habitat, and the public,” the judge wrote.

Time honored?  Time honored by whom? Certainly not the people who care about the iconic bison and certainly not by the bison themselves, who’s only crime is to live in a world where you are killed for being hungry. Does this make any sense to you?

What image is conjured in your mind when you think of  Montana? Beautiful mountains, parks, wild rivers or bison sent to slaughter for the crime of being hungry? Or is it the hundreds of dead wolves sacrificed for the sacred cow?

Montana is shooting its tourism industry in the foot. People from all over the world come to see Yellowstone’s wild free-free roaming bison. They are clearly worth much more alive than dead but the Montana Department of Livestock and their minions  would rather round them up like cattle for slaughter in the name of their red herring excuse, brucellosis.

There has not been one single documented case of bison transferring brucellosis to cattle. BUT there have been cases by the other brucellosis carrying animal,  that’s allowed to roam freely in Montana, ELK!! Why aren’t elk rounded up, tested and slaughtered? Because the hunting lobby would scream to high heaven. Oh FWP announced they’re going to carry out a brucellosis study on elk but elk are still allowed to range freely, NEAR CATTLE. How in the world is the bison slaughter justified when there is a double standard between elk and bison? It’s a selective crisis and it’s killing Yellowstone’s iconic buffalo.

WAKE UP AMERICA!! THESE BISON ARE A NATIONAL TREASURE. THEY ARE ALREADY THREATENED WITH A GENETIC FLAW THAT COMBINED WITH SLAUGHTER COULD DOOM THEM!!

The real reason bison are prisoners in Yellowstone National Park and  are sent to slaughter if they dare leave,  is the cattle industry does not want bison competing with cattle for grass. That’s it. Forget brucellosis.  It’s all about precious cattle and competition for grazing land.

There is something pro-active you can do to help bison and wolves right now.  Stop eating beef.  That would be a powerful way to hit the livestock industry in its wallet, where it hurts. It may sound radical but it’s not as hard as you might think. Evey time you enjoy a steak or grab a hamburger at McDonald’s think about the untold suffering and destruction the cattle industry has wrought, not just in this country but around the world. Even if you slowed your consumption of beef it would help. The bison would thank you, the cows who suffer greatly would thank you and the wolves would definitely thank you. Think about it.

PLEASE CONTINUE TO WRITE TO GOVERNOR SCHWEITZER. IF YOU’RE PLANNING A TRIP TO MONTANA LET HIM KNOW YOU’VE DECIDED TO SPEND YOUR TOURIST DOLLARS ELSEWHERE, UNTIL THEY STOP SLAUGHTERING YELLOWSTONE’S FREE ROAMING WILD BISON.

Governor Brian Schweitzer
Office of the Governor
Montana State Capitol Bldg.
P.O. Box 200801
Helena MT 59620-0801
(406) 444-3111, FAX (406) 444-5529

Comments: CLICK HERE

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Judge clears way for Yellowstone bison slaughter

By Laura Zuckerman Mon Feb 14, 8:55 pm ET

SALMON, Idaho (Reuters) – A federal judge on Monday denied a request from environmentalists to halt the execution of buffalo at Yellowstone National Park, a ruling that clears the way for hundreds of buffalo to be shipped to slaughter.

To read the rest of the story CLICK HERE


Videos: Courtesy GreaterYellowstone, BFC, buffalomatter

Photos: Courtesy Buffalo Field Campaign, Public Domain Images

Posted: Yellowstone’s Wild Free-Roaming Bison, biodiversity

Tags: Bison slaughter, archaic brutal management tools, brucellosis red herring, Yellowstone’s iconic bison, Montana Tourism


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10 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. (Please, don’t shoot me in the foot for this but…)
    If you do eat beef, patronize local & smaller ranches – the families who grow their beef on their own land and take responsibility for their animals.
    Look in your community for small family-owned ’boutique’ butcher shops who most likely acquire their beef from a local source.
    And let your fast-food places know, politely, why you won’t be buyin’ your burgers from them; encourage them to buy from small, local ranchers and contribute to local economies.
    Research. Study. And research again. Support small-scale hands-on stock owners, farms & growers. If we can’t put a dent in welfare ranching or find legal relief for our wild life, we can at least turn our backs on those who abuse the system and keep our money out of their pockets.

    Like

    • Lisa, good suggestions, I’m all for creative ways to solve this problem. The cattle industry causes so much suffering it’s hard to imagine the scope of it. Anyway we can reduce that, I’m for it. My contribution is not eating meat but I know it hard for people to do that. Just cutting down on consumption of beef would help.

      N.

      Like

  2. OMG! this makes me sick!
    I agree Nabeki, don’t eat beef! I buy my beef from a northern CA small family farm that I know is not involved with this.
    I just called the National Parks Conservation Association (I’m a member) to ask about this…She said they are trying to secure a ranch area for them called Royal Teton where they can go if they go out of bounds from the park and won’t be bothered or harassed or KILLED! She also gave me the phone number of someone who knows more about what is being done to stop this…Patrica Dowd 406-585-1380 (haven’t phoned her yet)
    This is so horrible, they Haze them ship them 500 miles and then kill them? Why?
    Somehow we need to get Salazar out of office? Recall? I don’t know he is bad news for bison,wolves all wildlife!

    Like

    • For some unknown reason the Governor put a stop to the bison slaughter but I hope the Buffalo Field Campaign still goes forward with their appeal to the ninth circuit. Maybe they can sort out this madness. The bison being killed because they’re hungry and the wolves being killed because they’re hungry and want to eat their normal prey, elk. The whole world has turned upside down crystalwolf. I never know what to expect when I wake up in the morning. What fresh hell will befall our wolves and bison. It’s a new twist everyday.

      N.

      Like

  3. […] Yellowstone Bison Slaughter Given Green Light….. (howlingforjustice.wordpress.com) […]

    Like

  4. Bleeearrrgh. I feel better and better about my decision not to eat beef any more. For a while beef and fish were the only meats I ate, because it seemed as though there was less factory-farming-style cruelty associated with those, but I finally decided to go full-on vegetarian. I’ve been meat-free for the past month and a half, and I really don’t miss it that much; plus, eating this way has done good things for my peace of mind, and probably my wallet as well (meat’s expensive!). It has also resulting in my trying (and liking!) a number of new foods that I probably would have ignored otherwise. Going veggie doesn’t mean you have to eat weird meat substitutes either; I haven’t touched a soy burger since I started. I stick to protein sources that are good the way they are without pretending to be meat, like lentils and peanut butter. I’m not out to condemn anybody who continues to eat meat, but for those considering vegetarianism or a low-meat diet, I want to offer encouragement. It might not be as hard as you think!

    Like

    • Way to go CaptainSakonna. So glad to hear it. I don’t like to proselytize either but the cattle industry causes so much suffering for our bison, wolves and other wildlife, not to mention the cutting down of the rain forests for cattle ranches, the competition for grazing land around the world is contributing to habitat loss for many species.

      I actually got used to soy burgers but they taste a lot better now then the did ten years ago I can tell you. Morningstar Farms does a really good job. Also I love Silk Very Vanilla Soy milk. Soy beans are a good protein source, and Silk doesn’t use genetically engineered soybeans. It’s not really that hard and as you said Captain Sakonna you can explore new and different types of food you might not have considered before!!

      N.

      Like

  5. BISON ABUSE MERITS HARSH CRITICISM

    Guest editorial by Dr. Brian L. Horejsi-
    Bison Abuse Merits Harsh Criticism
    Harsh criticism is increasingly justified in todays world of National Park and public land management, a world in which regulatory retreat from principles and regulation is the new norm and “gut and grab” politics seem to be an every day threat. One such issue deserving of harsh review is the continuous persecution of bison in the Yellowstone ecosystem. What is happening on Yellowstone’s borders is no less offensive than the corralling and clubbing of dolphins in Japan, the clubbing of seal pups off Canada’s coast, or the indiscriminate slaughter of African elephants that eventually led to massive population declines barely a decade ago.

    The institutionalized abuse of ecological and behavioral cycles that bison have responded to for over ten thousand years, making them at one time the most successful and numerous large North American grazing animal, is abhorrent to people around the world. It is moreover a dangerous indication that a mountain of ecological / scientific knowledge, gained over half a century, and presumably vested in government agencies, is being ignored and wasted. A massive accumulation of social, scientific, and management evidence is being trumped by a shrinking minority in the livestock business, blindly aided and abetted by the Montana Dept of Livestock, the federal Animal Health Inspection Service and a not so silent partner, the Park Service. Why are we investing tens of millions of dollars and spending lifetimes doing research into ecological well being?

    Thousands of bison have been casualties of this retreat from reason and accountability, and 500 more are in the crosshair this week, but these helpless and trusting animals have not been the only casualties. These practices have inflicted psychological damage to a century old link between “wild” and wildlife. They have degraded National Parks as strongholds of biodiversity and ecosystem conservation; they have severely set back the long established, but obviously vulnerable principle that American citizens should set the vision and direction of National Park management; and they have gouged wounds in what has been one of the most unifying issues in Americas floundering democracy – the right of people from every street and every state in the Nation to be heard when significant National Park decisions are being made.

    It strikes me as severe treatment to confine “wild” bison at all (other than the rare soundly justified research project) but the fact that National Park staff are complicit with this practice and seem to turn a blind eye to plans to again destroy bison indicates a major professional retreat by senior management. This represents failure by the Park Service to serve the people of America by protecting and maintaining, or recovering, the biodiversity of the ecosystem as a top level management / conservation objective.

    I confess I have a personal interest in this issue; For days, several times each year, I walk parts of Yellowstone, and one of the joys of doing so is being in (often) constant contact (visually, space wise, philosophically, emotionally, ecologically, and professionally,) with bison and their ecological footprint. But I also am part of a collective interest; millions of Americans have fought for Yellowstone to be the best it can be, and millions have visited it and enjoyed what I have, and millions more are entitled to enjoy an intact Yellowstone when they eventually get there. I admittedly resent the continued abuse of bison by a sadly outdated Montana Dept of Livestock and its political sidekicks, apparently embraced in a twisted partnership with the Park Service. I fear for these bison, for Yellowstone, and for the power gap developing between self serving local agency actors and the American people. The slaughter and perpetual harassment of Yellowstone bison may be a “time honored” practice – what on earth was that Judge thinking? – but so was the exploitation of children in coal mines, abuse of African Americans, joy killing of millions of bison from railway cars, and dumping sewage in water ways. Call it what you may, it remains a chronic, unethical and inexcusable conflict that has to move up the power ladder for resolution.

    Until bison have low elevation winter range freely available, there will be no peace on the land and Yellowstone cannot lay claim to being ecologically intact. People in Washington, even Helena, legislators, citizens, activists that are not mired in the petty local politics need to step in decisively. It will cost money – literally peanuts when put in perspective – but its time for America to move beyond this festering division in favor of the greater public good as exemplified by a protected and intact Yellowstone National Park, public lands managed for all Americans, and largely free ranging bison.

    Dr. Brian Horejsi is a long time user of Yellowstone and a wildlife scientist. He currently lives in Alberta

    Like

  6. BISON ABUSE MERITS HARSH CRITICISM
    BISON ABUSE MERITS HARSH CRITICISM

    Guest editorial by Dr. Brian L. Horejsi-
    Bison Abuse Merits Harsh Criticism
    Harsh criticism is increasingly justified in todays world of National Park and public land management, a world in which regulatory retreat from principles and regulation is the new norm and “gut and grab” politics seem to be an every day threat. One such issue deserving of harsh review is the continuous persecution of bison in the Yellowstone ecosystem. What is happening on Yellowstone’s borders is no less offensive than the corralling and clubbing of dolphins in Japan, the clubbing of seal pups off Canada’s coast, or the indiscriminate slaughter of African elephants that eventually led to massive population declines barely a decade ago.

    The institutionalized abuse of ecological and behavioral cycles that bison have responded to for over ten thousand years, making them at one time the most successful and numerous large North American grazing animal, is abhorrent to people around the world. It is moreover a dangerous indication that a mountain of ecological / scientific knowledge, gained over half a century, and presumably vested in government agencies, is being ignored and wasted. A massive accumulation of social, scientific, and management evidence is being trumped by a shrinking minority in the livestock business, blindly aided and abetted by the Montana Dept of Livestock, the federal Animal Health Inspection Service and a not so silent partner, the Park Service. Why are we investing tens of millions of dollars and spending lifetimes doing research into ecological well being?

    Thousands of bison have been casualties of this retreat from reason and accountability, and 500 more are in the crosshair this week, but these helpless and trusting animals have not been the only casualties. These practices have inflicted psychological damage to a century old link between “wild” and wildlife. They have degraded National Parks as strongholds of biodiversity and ecosystem conservation; they have severely set back the long established, but obviously vulnerable principle that American citizens should set the vision and direction of National Park management; and they have gouged wounds in what has been one of the most unifying issues in Americas floundering democracy – the right of people from every street and every state in the Nation to be heard when significant National Park decisions are being made.

    It strikes me as severe treatment to confine “wild” bison at all (other than the rare soundly justified research project) but the fact that National Park staff are complicit with this practice and seem to turn a blind eye to plans to again destroy bison indicates a major professional retreat by senior management. This represents failure by the Park Service to serve the people of America by protecting and maintaining, or recovering, the biodiversity of the ecosystem as a top level management / conservation objective.

    I confess I have a personal interest in this issue; For days, several times each year, I walk parts of Yellowstone, and one of the joys of doing so is being in (often) constant contact (visually, space wise, philosophically, emotionally, ecologically, and professionally,) with bison and their ecological footprint. But I also am part of a collective interest; millions of Americans have fought for Yellowstone to be the best it can be, and millions have visited it and enjoyed what I have, and millions more are entitled to enjoy an intact Yellowstone when they eventually get there. I admittedly resent the continued abuse of bison by a sadly outdated Montana Dept of Livestock and its political sidekicks, apparently embraced in a twisted partnership with the Park Service. I fear for these bison, for Yellowstone, and for the power gap developing between self serving local agency actors and the American people. The slaughter and perpetual harassment of Yellowstone bison may be a “time honored” practice – what on earth was that Judge thinking? – but so was the exploitation of children in coal mines, abuse of African Americans, joy killing of millions of bison from railway cars, and dumping sewage in water ways. Call it what you may, it remains a chronic, unethical and inexcusable conflict that has to move up the power ladder for resolution.

    Until bison have low elevation winter range freely available, there will be no peace on the land and Yellowstone cannot lay claim to being ecologically intact. People in Washington, even Helena, legislators, citizens, activists that are not mired in the petty local politics need to step in decisively. It will cost money – literally peanuts when put in perspective – but its time for America to move beyond this festering division in favor of the greater public good as exemplified by a protected and intact Yellowstone National Park, public lands managed for all Americans, and largely free ranging bison.

    Dr. Brian Horejsi is a long time user of Yellowstone and a wildlife scientist. He currently lives in Alberta

    Reply

    Like

    • Just a simply amazing piece Jerry. Everything that needed to be said about the horrific treatment of bison, was said in that editorial.

      I think the biggest reason Schweitzer temporarily stopped the slaughter was because of the enormous support there is for bison in this country and around the world. People are sickened by the treatment these iconic and magnificent animals have and are receiving. Maybe this is a watershed year for bison and real solutions will be forthcoming. We have to hold these people accountable for what they’re doing to our national heritage.

      N.

      Like


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