Two Socks…

Two Socks was an amazing wolf character played by two wolves Buck and Teddy in the epic movie Dances With Wolves.  His cruel death at the hands of evil, heartless men, reflects the sickening attitudes driving the wolf holocaust in the Northern Rockies today. It’s art imitating life.

For all the Two Socks trying to survive, this is dedicated to you.

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Photo: Courtesy screened

Posted in: Biodiversity, gray wolf

Tags: Two Socks, Dances with Wolves

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Published in: on December 10, 2011 at 2:29 am  Comments (38)  
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38 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. How I wish we could say: “Don’t cry. This is only a story. Wolves don’t get butchered for real”,

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    • Uhhhh, duh, yeah they do!

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    • They are slaughtered every day. 😦

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    • Me too Gitte, if only this was just a bad dream and we could wake up from it. We knew this would happen, wolf advocate predicated it, that’s why we worked so hard to stop the delisting. The states should NEVER HAVE CONTROL OF WOLVES, THEY ARE INCAPABLE OF TREATING THEM PROPERLY. This is an all our war on wolves,

      For the wolves,
      Nabeki

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    • Reality is cruel..can´t even find words for it..juts too sad

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  2. We can say many things but we need to organize & form groups that are visibly seen, with colorful signs & tables with petitions just to get people enraged over this butchery. We need to be visible, with TV stations & newspapers notified so that we are noticed, especially by CONGRESS, & the ones killing these wonderful animals. Sadly there are people in the Idaho area that don’t think anything about these killings. But by getting groups of people out there OFTEN, this will get attention & then hopefully brought to a stop.

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    • That’s it Caryn…visible and often. We have to flood their offices with phone calls, letters to the editor, protests, vigils. WE HAVE TO BE VISIBLE, otherwise they think we don’t care and can get away with anything they want. The arrogance is stunning.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

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  3. Tsuligi … This reminds everyone what the fight is all about … A wonderful movie … But very sad at how man’s ignorance is destroying what we hold dear …

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    • Janet…watching Two Socks, his little life and how he died, is in a nutshell what is going on in the Northern Rockies, soon to spread to the Great Lakes. If you can bear to watch the ending, how close is it to art imitating life??

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

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  4. I know it is only a movie, but it moved me to tears for all the wonderful wolves who are dying everyday.

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  5. If any of you use Google+, I just made a pro-wolf page there. It is called “Wolf Pack Plus” and you can link to it here: https://plus.google.com/#110985418315150353725/posts People are still in the process of adopting Google+ … it does not have nearly as many pages as Facebook, and doesn’t seem to have a lot of wolf-related content. I thought it important to start claiming territory there, so to speak. If you use Google+ at all, please visit the page and “circle” it … thanks!

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  6. I couldn’t watch the movie. Never have, never will. I’d get sick.

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    • I share your feelings

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      • Graciela,,,,I love Two Socks but this is what happens to wolves when they trust humans. Wolves have to be wary and stay as far away from people as possible.

        For the wolves,
        Nabeki

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    • Sorry Anne, I know it’s disturbing but it is an epic movie, not just about wolves but about the end of an era. One of my favorite movies. I can barely watch Two Socks being killed, it makes me bawl like a baby, so I understand how you feel.

      For the wolves,
      Nabeki

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  7. At the end of the movie ‘Dances Wiyh Wolves’ , as the army descended on the deserted village, a wolf was depicted howling on a high ridge. His name was Shunktocha (misspelled probably) and he was used in the scene because his mate, Zizi, a gray Canadian wolf, could not be made to howl on that day. His owner , Fred DuBrey, was just over the otherside of the ridge, coaxing him to howl. I was fortunate to know Alene DuBrey and got one of their cubs in April 0f 1991. Although he (Dakota) could not be housetrained , he lived in a large outdoor enclosure and was my friend for 14 years. He was a great ambasador for his kind. I would include a photo of him but am not sure how to do that on this site.

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    • Chris, what an amazing story. I would love if you could share a picture of your beloved Dakota. If you send me the url I’ll do the rest (:

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

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      • Chris..that’s the same video I posted last night in the Idaho post.

        For the wolves, For the wild ones,
        Nabeki

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    • Dear Nabeki.
      Send you the URL for Dakota’s picture? I have no website. Just an e-mail address., which you should have access to. Further instructions needed to send that picture.
      Chris Cooper

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      • Chris…right click on his picture, it should give you choices to click, you’re looking for “image location”. It should have jpeg or gif at the end of the url. Copy the url and paste it into a post here in the comment section. Then I’ll see if I can display it here. If you need more help, let me know.

        For the wolves,
        Nabeki

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  8. Interesting that you used “Two Socks” for a commentary. In the movie “Two socks” was portrayed behaving first in stage 2 of Prof. L David Mech’s behavior structure of wolves to humans (not fleeing, just cautious avoidance) and progresses to Stage 3 (approach with caution), and finally to Stage 4 (Acceptance). Sadly, it is the stage 3 and 4 behavior that made him a close in target for those who would harm him.

    This effect is why no one should feed wolves or any other wildlife that might be at risk or perceived as “vermin.” Once there, a confident wolf, or even a fox, will approach and stand by a human who doesn’t “seem” threatening. It has happened to me. I can crumple a candy bar wrapper in my pocket, just making a sound, not an offering, when relatively near a wild fox and tell immediately if it has been fed by human tourists before. It will come a’running and stop at your feet looking up at you. There are at least two adult gray wolves in Yellowstone’s Hayden Valley that are similarly conditioned, but seem somewhat more cautious. I fear for all of their lives should they stray from the protected enclaves.

    So much advertising (lately) again seems to show wolves as mindless savage beasts, snarling insanely, and “charging” humans. For my 2 cents worth, the trainers who provide animals for this commercial aggression display are as bad as any other killer. It just isn’t true for any general wolf population. I raise and work with German Shepherd dogs in obedience and protection, and I am amused that our term for the overly cautious, spooky and defensive dog is “wolfish” … because that IS true. German Shepherds are not wolves, they are derived dogs selectively breed for overt boldness and all all around aloof demeanor. Of my two dogs now, the male is aloof in the extreme, but will cross a football field to get anyone, or anything, perceived as a threat by both of us. (That robotic “attack dog” meme is Hollywood BS) My other dog is a “spooky” dog, who would harm nothing that did not try to corner her, as all she wants to do is play. She is “wolfish” in the extreme … but she is not cowardly, as she will momentarily take on the big alpha guy if irritated. In short, my most wolf like dog is the least dangerous to anyone or any other animal.

    I tend to see wild wolves the same way and have not had any experiences to indicate otherwise. In short, I believe in veracity of the research done by L. David Mech.

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    • Interesting comments regarding the GS dogs, and “wolfish” behavior. My new GSD is “all shepherd” so to speak…Very aloof and tense in the presence of strangers, human or canine; very very sweet and in-tune with me…training her has been a challenge and has pushed my Omega nature to a new place, but we have struck a truce and it is going much better now that we essentially share/balance the alpha role…I have conceded her domain; to protect the car, the house, out other animal family, and ultimately me; she has conceded my domain is to protect and provide for us all, including her. So far it works. As for “wolfish” I wouldn’t want to be the person who stepped into our home when I wasn’t present or who tried to corner me in a dark alley. I do believe she’d go for the juggler and never let up!

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      • I contacted Direct VV because of their horrible ad depicting Wolves attacking some poor human in snowy conditions – than put on hold while the customer moves to another room and starts the program again – disgusting and just adding to the Wolf horror stories – coupled w/ how stupid people are and how little they know it sure does not help the Wolf image – which is similar to the German Shepherd – depicted in all those nazi movies along side the trains or in police lines snarling and lunging @end of leash ( I have had five GSD’s and make a point of being friendly to anyone that wants to stop and talk w/ us, but you can see how wary they are) Other people should complain about the use of animals in commercials depicting them in a negative light.

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      • Glad you are enjoying your GSD. You seem to have figured out the general GSD personality. The aloofness is a put off to many people who don’t get it. You will find that she is a watcher, one who is perpetually thinking and “plotting” new things to get you to do. She does not sound a bit wolfish.

        “Wolfishness” is generally considered a “flaw” in GSD’s by breeders and trainers, but as with all living things, the range of “personality” is dynamic, and in my case, my girl’s spookiness is what was needed … the perfect Omega to a strong Alpha male, and I selected her specifically for it. They’re “companions” not lovers per se and I don’t breed them. Her pedigree is near spectacular, so her demeanor is a bit of a surprise to the cognoscenti. She even has yellow eyes to suit her demeanor … if not for the huge GSD ears she could easily pass for a wolf if her legs were a bit longer. She’s our house clown and entertainer.

        My point was that the common depiction of wolves is the opposite of what the vast majority are like. The GSD is a managed evolution, just as Border Collies are, from the basic wary attitude. I’ve walked the hills and mountains in Montana, outside the park, and heard the calls, but in years of doing so, I’ve not seen many of the wolves I know reside in those areas (which is fine with me) … if they can survive the hunting they will continue. I’m sure, like Cougars, they’ve seen me, without me seeing them. I’m a whole lot more cautious when I find Cougar sign.

        The only time in verifiable recorded North American history that there has been any conflict between wolves and man is when man has let them connect him with food, or habituated them with garbage dumps or livestock herds in some areas, which once identified as food, the wolf will defend territorially. Jogging on a wilderness trail is silly, and doing so with a domestic dog alongside more so, unless v-e-r-y well trained. You get 10+ or so miles in to real wilderness a wolf is your least threat … so walk don’t run … there are critters out there that are far more responsive to a-n-y fast movement than wolves. Wolves might encircle you out of curiosity, then move on, if you’re inside their territory, but Griz just might decide to kick your butt or worse.

        Another note: when you see bears, et al, near paved roadways, they might seem very cautious and not aggressive even within 25 yards or so, such as in a National Park. They will not give you that latitude in the back country where 100+ yards is a much better choice for you … in that back country you must pay close attention to all signs and sounds, including checking your back trail from time to time. If something is quietly following you, it is not a wolf.

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  9. Miserable all those that kill these beautifull animals, that suffer at the hands of insensible people. Are we the human race or we are the savage race!!!!!

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  10. Makes me cry each and every time – gorgeous and heart-rending, I knew when I saw the movie that people really are capable of such monstrous acts.

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    • birdpond…One of the saddest animal death scenes in movie history. I can barely stand to watch it even now. But this is what’s happening to our wolves as I type this and much worse, they are being trapped and snared. Idaho is planning on aerial gunning wolves in the Lolo, they are bringing in trappers from Alaska to try and finish the wolves off in the Lolo. Madness!!!

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

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  11. Had to stop it @ the place where they kill him. I was already crying. I hated that part.

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    • Me too Christie….but it mimics reality. Those men remind me of the wolf haters of today, who want every last wolf dead.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

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  12. little did I know it then, but I watched this movie at least 3 times, and eventually I realized it was the wolf that endeared me to the picture…nice to know it was wolveS (-)

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  13. I hate to change the subject, but here is more good news from the Obama regime:

    “Proposed Obama Policy on Endangered Species Act Is Recipe for Extinction”:

    http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2011/endangered-species-act-12-08-2011.html

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  14. Hi Aridog, thankx for the info…don’t have any real wilderness here where I live, 1-mile to the Delaware Bay and 15 miles to the Atlantic Ocean. But, I do have an acre of woods in my backyard where I do see an occasional red fox, raccoon, or deer. I did take my 4 dogs for an off-leash walk on a 1-mile trail on some “state” land (i.e., wooded land designated for a future sewer plant that will not likely be installed in my lifetime), and we all had a great time. And yes, I keep my GSD and the others within a few yards of me at all times. They know that they MUST stay “with me” or the leash comes back on instantly. We saw a dead snake, looked like he just froze where he lay (?); nothing more exciting than that today.

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    • Donna …Not much “wilderness” where I live either (Detroit Metro area), other than the relatively semi-wild parts of the Rouge River drainage basin, where fox, coyote, deer, feral dogs, and sundry other furry critters move back and forth. With the advent of coyotes this far south in Michigan, the feral dog population has diminished. In some parts of your east coast area, black bears have migrated in to suburbia, and it is possible here … even wolves could come on down if they chose to do so, but not likely to do so close to the city.

      The wilderness I refer to is the Absaroka, Bear Tooth, Gallatin, and Crazy mountains in Montana and northern Wyoming. There, with a bit of hiking, you can get in to some truly wild country with everything from Grizzly and Moose to Wolves and Badgers. I visit there regularly as my preferred vacation get-away spot … the cabin I rent two weeks+ at a time, 2 or 3 times a year, is on the Yellowstone River north of the park, no phone, no TV, (but Wi-Fi can be had with the appropriate WWAN modem) … I just wander around and read books when there. It is close enough to small towns to get what you need, yet a short hop to truly wild land. Best time to see wolves, with any relative certainty, is winter in Yellowstone on one of the Snow Lodge tour packages.

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  15. sound like a fun place to go…but for me, not without Sugar…Have fun!

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  16. Pls watch..I wonder if this could help our wolves too

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    • Sonia,
      I think pro active ranching is a great idea..even though we have to be clear, livestock depredation is a smokescreen promoted by ranchers to kill wolves. Ranchers lose very few livestock to wolves, most losses come from non-predation and other predators. DOW has worked with ranchers for 16 years, compensating them for livestock losses and other programs to encourage pro active ranching. Sadly, most ranchers are not any more tolerant of wolves today then they were sixteen years ago. Compensating ranchers for miniscule livestock depredations by wolves fosters a victim mentality by the rancher. They don’t see any reason to be pro active because they can just call Wildllife Services to kill a wolf that they say is bothering or hurting their cattle.

      It sounds like the ranchers in Namibia are reasonable. Unfortunately I cannot say that for many of the ranchers in wolf country.

      Thanks for the great video.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

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  17. A friend of ours has the Granddaughter of Two socks. Very smart and very loveable.

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