Navarre The Wolf, Shot, Paralyzed, Rescued From Freezing Waters

January 8, 2014

Revisiting Navarre’s story is a renewal of faith.  There are good people in this world who care deeply for animals like this sweet, little wolf. I hope you find comfort in this, even though it wasn’t a happy ending.

We love you Navarre!!

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Kindness and love in action, saving a wolf from certain death. This beautiful video is narrated in Italian but really needs no translation. It’s heartfelt, moving and incredibly uplifting to watch  wonderful people working so hard to save a wolf’s life. To them I say:

“May flowers always line your path and sunshine light your day. May songbirds serenade you every step along the way. May a rainbow run beside you in a sky that’s always blue. And may happiness fill your heart each day your whole life through.”…..Irish Blessing

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Saving Navarre: The Dramatic Rescue of a Paralyzed Shot Wolf

Good news: due to the selfless efforts of rescuers Navarre is slowly recovering
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Following up on the dramatic and risky rescue of an entrapped female humpback whale named Valentina I just learned about another most amazing rescue of a wolf named Navarre from the icy waters of a river in Italy. Here’s the heartwarming story that may just move you to teears of joy.

“On January 9, 2012 the wolf Navarre was recovered from the icy waters of a river in very dramatic conditions: undernourished, with a paralysis of the hind limbs and with 35 lead pellets in his body.

“After several diagnostic tests, two weeks of intensive care in the infirmary, monitored 24 hours 24, Navarre started to walk. He was transferred to another enclosure of the Centre, suitable for his rehabilitation, which requires a gradual recovery of motor function without subjecting him to excessive physical effort. Thanks to a video camera placed in the enclosure Navarre is monitored day and night without being disturbed.

“It’s still a long way, various diseases have weakened him a lot, but Navarre, thanks to his incredible will to live and care he received, started to walk improving gradually and giving good signs of recovery.”

Read more: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/animal-emotions/201301/saving-navarre-the-dramatic-rescue-paralyzed-shot-wolf

The Wolf Navarre – Two months after

Sadly Navarre died on June 5, 2012.


From: CentroTutelaFauna (Wildlife Protection Center)

“We will continue to carry forward the ” Project Wolf” more certain than ever that this species should be protected, known and respected , stronger than we have had the privilege of learning to date and aware of what we still have to learn about these amazing animals … and for this reason grateful to Navarre .”

http://www.centrotutelafauna.org/appr/La_storia_di_Navarre.xhtml

Please give to this wonderful organization Centro Tutela Fauna (Wildlife Conservation Center -Protection Center for Exotic Wildlife Mountain Search and Rescue) That’s my poor Italian translation but the link below should get you to the right place (:

Click here for their website

Click here for their YouTube channel

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Wolf : Navarre’s rescue story: Video: Courtesy Dario Cingolani

All other videos: Courtesy YouTube CentroTutelaFauna·

Posted in: gray wolf, Activism, Positive wolf news

Tags: acts of kindness, rescued wolf, shot wolf, paralyzed, Navarre’s brave rescue, kind wonderful people, Italy

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Real Men Are Kind To Animals (and occasionally use the F word)

Wolf or coyote, it doesn’t matter. Empathy, pass it on!

(alert: F bombs)

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More acts of kindness. Young Humpback whale rescued from fish netting that was killing her.

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Video: Courtesy

Second Video: Courtesy

Photo: Courtesy “Real Men Are Kind To Animals” FB

Posted in: Positive wolf news, Random acts of kindness

Tags: random acts of kindness, empathy, good men, always carry wire cutters

Wolf Recovery Sought Across US…Please Support This Plan!!

I’m reposting this because I think it’s the future of wolf recovery in this country. Wolves must be allowed to reclaim their historical home range, not be boxed in by brutal state management plans. USFWS should scrap the outdated wolf plan and give serious consideration to the Center For Biological Diversity national wolf plan!!  We have to take the lead on this people. Start writing USFWS, in support of this plan. It’s the only thing that makes sense for wolves.

PRESS RELEASE: CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

For Immediate Release, July 20, 2010

Contact:  Michael Robinson, (575) 534-0360

Wolf Recovery Sought Across Country: West Coast, New England, Colorado and Great Plains

Silver City, N.M.— Gray wolves should be recovered in multiple, connected populations throughout the United States, according to a scientific petition filed today by the Center for Biological Diversity with Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The petition asks for development of a national recovery plan for the gray wolf under the Endangered Species Act to establish wolf populations in suitable habitat in the Pacific Northwest, California, Great Basin, southern Rocky Mountains, Great Plains and New England.

“Existing recovery plans for wolves in the northern Rocky Mountains and upper Midwest are out of date and apply to a small fraction of the wolf’s historic range,” said the Center’s Michael Robinson. “It’s time to develop a national recovery plan to facilitate true recovery of the gray wolf.”

Currently, gray wolf populations are limited to the northern Rocky Mountains, western Great Lakes and Southwest, which makes up less than 5 percent of their historic range. In part, this reflects the fact that the gray wolf has never had a national recovery plan, though it has been listed in the entire conterminous United States since 1978. Instead, individual recovery plans have been developed for only the three areas that now harbor populations. These plans were developed in the late 1970s and 1980s and are now outdated. Besides failing to recognize that wolves can be recovered to other areas, the plans set population goals well below what are now considered necessary for population health and survival. In the northern Rocky Mountains, for example, the recovery plan only called for 30 breeding pairs, split between three subpopulations.

“Small, isolated wolf populations are a recipe for extinction,” said Robinson. “Science teaches us that we need far more wolves that range across a much wider swath of the continent than the current minimalistic approach.”

The Center’s petition starts a process in which the Fish and Wildlife Service must make a determination on whether to develop such a recovery plan based on the science in the petition and the requirements of the law. The Endangered Species Act requires recovery of endangered animals and plants throughout all significant portions of their range.

“Wolves are an engine of evolution,” said Robinson. “They help feed bears, eagles and wolverines with the leftovers from their kills; they help pronghorn antelope and even foxes survive by controlling coyotes. A continent-wide approach to wolf recovery is necessary both to save the wolf and to restore ecosystems across the United States.”

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/news/press_releases/2010/gray-wolf-national-petition-07-20-2010.html

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Finally someone is calling for a national wolf recovery plan. I think the Center is seizing the opportunity to propose true wolf recovery in this country. 

If Judge Molloy relists the Northern Rockies wolf population there will be a chance to rewrite the rules and wolves would no longer be under state controlled death sentences, following outdated management plans.  This is the only hope for wolves to make a full and complete recovery in America. 

I applaud the Center for their bold plan!! 

Read the full petition submitted to the Secretary of the Interior, Ken Salazar and Rowan Gould, Acting Director, USFWS.

Petition to the U.S. Department of Interior and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for  Development of a Recovery Plan for the Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) in the Conterminous United States Outside of the Southwest.

http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/species/mammals/northern_Rocky_Mountains_gray_wolf/pdfs/GrayWolfNationalRecoveryPlanAPAPetition.pdf

Take Action For Wolves, Support This Plan!!

ALL WOLF CONTACTS: CLICK HERE

 

Photo: Courtesy Tambako the Jaguar Flickr

Posted in: gray wolf/canis lupus, Positive wolf news, Wolf Recovery

Tags: bold wolf recovery plan, gray wolf, biodiversity, Lords of Nature

Living With Wolves……Germany’s Werner Freund

    

Werner Freund knows wolves.  He’s been studying and living with them for over thirty years. 

He started and runs the Wolfspark Werner Fruend in Merzig, Germany, which is home to twenty captive wolves.  He loves wolves and promotes their good qualities and dislikes their undeserved reputation.  He’s raised over 70 wolf pups. 

One misconception is wolves are people aggressive. Wild wolves are rarely aggressive towards people. Dogs are another story. Since dogs have lost their fear of humans and some dog species have high prey drives, that combination can get them in trouble.  Dogs kill twenty people a year and bite another 4.5 million.

Wolves on the other hand are very shy and fearful of people and wild wolf attacks on humans are extraordinarly rare. When they do happen they get huge amounts of press because they are so uncommon. Most wild wolves would rather be a hundred miles away from any human. 

A good example Werner Fruend relates, about wolves good nature, involves a camera shoot. Normally Werner is  the only one to enter the wolf pen but on this particular day a reporter entered with him.  They both dressed in smelly wolf-approved clothing.

“Entering the wolves’ realm required a specific — and smelly — dress code. A sweater that held the wolves’ scent and had to be worn, as did tall rubber boots caked in mud, dried blood and who knows what else. The combination was a jolt to the human nose but a treat for the wolves. They only stopped licking the stranger’s boots when Freund brought out the main course, a chunk of raw beef.

As Freund held the meat for the dining wolves, the reporter shot photos, at one point lying nearly flat on the ground to get a good angle, figuring the wolves would pay no heed while eating. But curiosity got the best of some, and soon the wolves were walking over the reporter, licking her face and camera and trying to pull out her hair bands. They succeeded. Though clearly strong, the wolves remained playful and friendly and never aggressive.”

Hair ties anyone?

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Germany’s leader of the pack: To study wolves, he must become one, researcher says

By Jennifer H. Swan and Marcus Klöckner, Stars and Stripes
Stripes European Travel, October 29, 2009

“In a sign of submission, an Arctic wolf pup licks German wolf researcher Werner Freund on the face while Freund visits with the animal in its enclosure at Wolfspark Werner Freund in Merzig, Germany.”

It’s clear who the dominant “wolf” is among the pack of hungry pups.

The one in charge lies on the ground, holding the slab of calf meat firmly in his teeth while the fair-coated Arctic canines tear off pieces of raw tendon and flesh. Between bites, they crawl playfully over his back all the while adhering to the group hierarchy, which means they don’t abscond with the meal, however tasty.

The alpha doesn’t eat. While he may smell like a wolf, howl and yelp like a wolf, and certainly demonstrates he can think like a wolf, the alpha is different in one very fundamental way: He’s a human named Werner Freund.

“When I am with the wolves, I become a wolf,” Freund says matter-of-factly. He is, as his book on wolf research is titled, Germany’s “wolf man.”

At 76, Freund is gray and grizzled like the creatures he has lived among for more than 30 years. Over the course of his lifetime, he has been many things, including a professional gardener, a German army sergeant, bear caretaker and world traveler.

His wolf man phase began later in life, five years after he settled in Merzig, Germany, in 1972. With land borrowed from the city, Freund and his wife, Erika, created a refuge for wolves in the neighboring Kammerforst forest. Wolfspark Werner Freund is currently home to more than 20 wolves from Europe, Siberia, Canada and elsewhere.

The wolves are acquired as cubs from zoos or animal parks, typically when they’re 10 to 14 days old. Freund, who’s raised more than 70 wolf pups, sequesters them from the public for six months, sleeping with them and feeding them by bottle every two hours until they’re ready for their first bites of meat. With such close interaction, the cubs think Freund is the she-wolf, or the alpha female of the pack. It’s a bond that lasts for the wolves’ lifetime and it’s why Freund can freely enter their territory and study their behavior up-close.

While humans may be able to train dogs, “you can’t domesticate a wolf,” Freund says. “I had to become a wolf” to be able to interact with them.

Freund says wolves, who live about six years in the wild, live longer at his center. One died there at age 17 this summer.

When Freund visits his wolves, he is meticulous about hygiene, a hard-earned lesson taught to him by the wolves.

One day he entered the territory of an alpha female Arctic wolf and her pack, and soon after went into another pack’s area, without showering. The dominant female in the second enclosure picked up “the smell of her opponent and suddenly she jumped high and bit me in the ear,” Freund recalls. “I had to fight with her and after the fight she came up to me and licked the blood dripping from my ear. That was a clear sign of her submission.”

Freund and his human assistants live in their own den on the park grounds, a cozy house where domestic cats have free rein and the wall decor in the living room reveals a lifetime of adventure and a love of all things wild.

Visitors may see the wolves for free — and perhaps catch a glimpse of the wolf man — during the park’s operating hours between sunup and sundown. Trails go past seven different fenced enclosures, inside of which like breeds of wolves live as packs. Though physically separate, the wolves often join one another in a chorus of spine-tingling howls that echo through the park. Visitors may even be lucky enough to spy Freund in the act. Howling, after all, is a form of bonding, Freund says.

Normally, visitors cannot mix with the wolves as Freund does. But there are exceptions.

On one day in late July, Freund invited a reporter to join him inside the Arctic pups’ enclosure. The opportunity would afford the chance to observe and photograph Freund and the wolves interacting up close.

Entering the wolves’ realm required a specific — and smelly — dress code. A sweater that held the wolves’ scent and had to be worn, as did tall rubber boots caked in mud, dried blood and who knows what else. The combination was a jolt to the human nose but a treat for the wolves. They only stopped licking the stranger’s boots when Freund brought out the main course, a chunk of raw beef.

As Freund held the meat for the dining wolves, the reporter shot photos, at one point lying nearly flat on the ground to get a good angle, figuring the wolves would pay no heed while eating. But curiosity got the best of some, and soon the wolves were walking over the reporter, licking her face and camera and trying to pull out her hair bands. They succeeded. Though clearly strong, the wolves remained playful and friendly and never aggressive.

That’s the side of wolves Freund wants the public to see, though from a more distant vantage. He is driven by a quest to give people a better understanding of the animals he loves so dearly.

“There is this image of the evil wolf but this is too far from reality,” he says. “Wolves kill in order to have something to eat, so do other animals.” Wolves, like people, are social creatures, Freund says.

His long-time assistant, Tatjana Schneider, adds: “Humans could learn a lot from wolves. They (wolves) stick together and try to survive.

Freund, she says, “wants to show and tell people about what the wolf really is, what it stands for.”

http://www.stripes.com/article.asp?section=103&article=65700

 Arctic Wolf Photo Courtesy: Stars and Stripes 

Posted in:  gray wolf/canis lupus, Positive Wolf News

Tags:  Wolfpark Werner Freund, living with wolves,  wolves in Germany

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