More Stupidity From The Fringe…..

Effects of elk overgrazing in Yellowstone

“The top photo……from a paper by Ripple and his colleague Robert Beschta, was taken in 1991; the photo below is from 2002 and illustrates the recovery of streamside cottonwoods after just seven years of wolf presence.”…Todd Palmer and Rod Pringle

October 9, 2013

Wolves are being slaughtered left and right but that’s not enough for the wolf haters. They still  find it necessary to visit this blog and spew their anti wolf dogma. The main talking points are centered around the sub species of wolf reintroduced in 95/96.  The story goes that Occidentalis is the big, bad Canadian wolf who replaced the sweet, loving Irremotus. That of course is BS. Yes, Occidentalis was the sub species reintroduced to Yellowstone and Central Idaho..but the myth that they are super wolves is absolutely ridiculous. Wolves are wolves, apex predators who are vital to healthy Eco-systems.

Unlike human hunters, who kill the strongest and genetically sound animals, wolves select out the weak, sick, old and yes sometimes the young, which  helps control ungulate populations. Wolves don’t hide behind AR-15′s, they go toe to toe with their prey, that’s fair chase. Human hunters use heavy firepower, traps, snares and every sneaky trick in the book to torture, abuse, maim and kill animals.  Trophy hunters have nothing to be proud of. NOTHING! They wouldn’t be such big, brave “hunters” if they were limited to using their bare hands. Fair chase my a@%.

Canus lupis Irremotus are very similar to Canis Lupus Occidentalis, who are a bit heavier but still both sub species are wolves. They live in packs, hunt cooperatively and put family above all else.

“Canis Lupus Irremotus…..This subspecies generally weighs 70–135 pounds (32–61 kg) and stands at 26–32 inches, making it one of the largest subspecies of the gray wolf in existence. It is a lighter colored animal than its southern brethren, the Southern Rocky Mountains wolf, with a coat that includes far more white and less black. In general, the subspecies favors lighter colors, with black mixing in among them”…..Wiki

Occidentalis has always lived on both sides of the Northern Rockies US/Canadian border, since wolves know no boundaries. Anyone who believes otherwise is living in a fantasy world.  The idea that Occidentalis is foreign to American soil is absurd. They’ve been crossing back and forth across that “border” for tens of thousands of years.

The burning question I have for the professors of wolfology is if Irremotus was loved so much, why the hell did their wolf hating forefathers try to wipe them out?  Of course  attempting to reason with the unreasonable is an exercise in futility, so I don’t expect a cogent response to that question.

The other favorite talking point of wolf haters is the Yellowstone elk herd. Wolves are accused of decimating the elk in Yellowstone, when in fact it was the feds who were killing Yellowstone elk for decades, in the wolf’s absence, due to the damage elk were wreaking in the park.

“Once the wolves were gone the elk began to take over. Over the next few years conditions of Yellowstone National Park declined drastically. A team of scientists visiting Yellowstone in 1929 and 1933 reported, “The range was in deplorable conditions when we first saw it, and its deterioration has been progressing steadily since then.” By this time many biologists were worried about eroding land and plants dying off. The elk were multiplying inside the park and deciduous, woody species such as aspen and cottonwood suffered from overgrazing. The park service started trapping and moving the elk and, when that was not effective, killing them. This killing continued for more than 30 years. This method helped the land quality from worsening, but didn’t improve the conditions. At times, people would mention bringing wolves back to Yellowstone to help control the elk population. The Yellowstone managers were not eager to bring back wolves, especially after having so successfully ridding the park of them, so they continued killing elk. In the late 1960s, local hunters began to complain to their congressmen that there were too few elk, and the congressmen threatened to stop funding Yellowstone. Killing elk was given up as a response, and then the population of the elk increased exponentially. With the rapid increase in the number of elk, the condition of the land again went quickly downhill. The destruction of the landscape affected many other animals. With the wolves gone, the population of coyotes increased dramatically, which led to an extreme decrease in the number of pronghorn antelope.However, the increase in the elk population caused the most profound change in the ecosystem of Yellowstone after the wolves were gone.”.…..Wiki

Elk numbers had swelled to over twenty thousand while wolves were away…a very bad thing for Yellowstone. As Aldo Leopold so eloquently states in Thinking Like A Mountain:

“I have lived to see state after state extirpate its wolves. I have watched the face of many a newly wolfless mountain, and seen the south-facing slopes wrinkle with a maze of new deer trails. I have seen every edible bush and seedling browsed, first to anaemic desuetude, and then to death. I have seen every edible tree defoliated to the height of a saddlehorn. Such a mountain looks as if someone had given God a new pruning shears, and forbidden Him all other exercise. In the end the starved bones of the hoped-for deer herd, dead of its own too-much, bleach with the bones of the dead sage, or molder under the high-lined junipers.

“I now suspect that just as a deer herd lives in mortal fear of its wolves, so does a mountain live in mortal fear of its deer. And perhaps with better cause, for while a buck pulled down by wolves can be replaced in two or three years, a range pulled down by too many deer may fail of replacement in as many decades. So also with cows. The cowman who cleans his range of wolves does not realize that he is taking over the wolf’s job of trimming the herd to fit the range. He has not learned to think like a mountain. Hence we have dust-bowls, and rivers washing the future into the sea.”

Do your homework wolf haters and stop parroting talking points drilled into your heads by the hunting and ranching cabal.

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ff

Submitted on 2013/07/14 at 1:17 pm | In reply to Helga Guillen.
Kill them alL!
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Andrew Light

Submitted on 2013/08/02 at 3:37 am
You antis need to go back to high school and learn about “carrying capacity.” fuck these wolves. bet half of you didn’t know these aren’t even the same breed of wolves we once had. i hope all your pets get eaten by wolves. Trap and hunt for life, come stop me please.
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LUNATIC OUTPOST FTW

Submitted on 2013/08/17 at 5:46 pm
who cares kill the wolves, IDGAF. stupid libtards.
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steve

Submitted on 2013/08/28 at 7:08 pm
You guys dont have much of a clue about wolves! You need to be educated on wolves! You should look at the web site “saveelk.com”. Read the Lynn Stutter on the truth about wolves!
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80hd

Submitted on 2013/09/03 at 11:21 am
Dispelling a myth, eh? The original wolves in Yellowstone were C. l. irremotus…. the wolves introduced were C. l. occidentalis. Guess where they came from?
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O.
submitted on 2013/09/17 at 10:28 am | In reply to Jan.| In reply to Jan.
Dear Jan,
I have lived in the West all my life. I am dedicated to conservation and habitat improvement for all native wildlife. The Canadian Grey Wolf is not native to Idaho, Montana or Wyoming. The Rocky Mountain Wolves that were documented living here in the 1980′s and early 1990′s were scavengers and did not efficiently hunt in packs. The native wolves were solitary, except during mating season, had large territories and made very little impact on prey species within their range.

The efforts to control the exploding population if this invasive species of wolves are warranted by the respective States because they need to protect native wildlife, livestock, tourism, habitat, and a number of other issues which are more important than accommodating a Federal Government’s program to establish a feral nightmare.
It is not about killing wolves. It is about protecting our ecosystems.
Respectfully,
O.

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Mark

Submitted on 2013/09/23 at 2:40 pm
That’s all fine and good but humans shouldn’t die so that these predators can thrive. Pure bleeding heart BS..

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matt

Submitted on 2013/09/30 at 1:57 pm
This is the biggest hunk of shit that I have ever read. You tree hugging fucks need to get a real job! “Protecting the Wolves” from the big bad ranchers and hunters. Please!

The “reimbursements” for cattle killed in New Mexico, are still yet to be seen. Countless cattle killed on ranches and not a penny in site. Furthermore, when the average cost to introduce one of these wolves is upwards of $1 million dollars, and our tax dollars go to this bullshit rather than the present deficit that our failed president has bestowed upon our country…
Sickening

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John

Submitted on 2013/10/06 at 3:40 pm

Thought you might like to read a response from one of the sickest part of the population. How much time do any of you spend on wildlife conservation? How many hrs per year do any of you spend on habitat renewal? I am willing to bet not as much time as your average hunter. I enjoy every second I spend in the wilderness I personally see hundreds of animals in a year. I also see the impact on the animals from over population. I see the side of nature most of you want to pretend doesn’t exist. The starving animals and the displaced wolves, coyotes, fox and others. You say its wrong to kill a coyote. Say that when you find one in your backyard about to rip your child apart. Ask a rancher how they feel about wolves. You won’t hear many say they like them.

Now onto “trophy hunting”. Trophy hunting and caged hunts are as different as night and day. Any respectable hunter would never take part in a caged hunt. Most people that do are rich wall street types that have no morals in the first place. A true Trophy hunter is not a butcher. They are men and women just like you. However they posses what some call the alpha gene. Most of these ” butchers” and “serial killers” see more animals than all of you combined. Maybe the kill one or two. They kill them because they are the oldest and largest of the type. A damn hard thing to do. Instead of blaming hunters maybe you should focus you misguided anger towards the developers. The ones who keep pushing the city further into the habitat of these animals. Believe it or not I love animals just as much if not more than most of you. I however am not afraid to get my hands bloody fixing the mess created by the non hunter. You might hand out meals at a soup kitchen. But hunters are the ones who put the meat on the plate.

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NOBODY

Submitted on 2013/10/04 at 4:41 pm | In reply to Daniel Martinez.

I live and hunt in Wyoming. Now hear me out, I do not hate wolves and do not want them to go extinct, but wolves have killed over 50% of our elk herds near Yellowstone and have completely decimated our moose, bighorn sheep, mountain goat, and deer herds. I agree that shooting a wolf right when it exits the park is kind of unethical, and that Wyoming needs wolves in its ecosystem. The thing is, these wolf populations have to be kept in check, and hunting is a good way to do that.

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These hateful views are represented by the hunting and ranching monopoly,  who in turn control policy makers in Washington, on both sides of the aisle. Their disinformation campaign has spread like a virus across this country and is contributing to the mass slaughter of wolves now taking place!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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Why We Need Wolves In Our Parks

Todd Palmer and Rob Pringle

Posted March 20, 2009 | 12:32 AM (EST)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/todd-palmer-and-rob-pringle/why-we-need-wolves-in-our_b_177209.html

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Top Photo: Courtesy Huffington Post

Bottom Photo: Courtesy of Brett Havestick

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Trophy hunting, Biodiversity

Tags: Canis Lupus Occidentalis, Canis Lupus Irremotus, anti wolfers ill-informed, biodiversity, trophic cascades, Aldo Leopold, Thinking Like A Mountain, trophy hunting animal abuse, hateful rhetoric, non science based thinking, lies and damn lies.

Someone Give Rocky Mountain National Park A Copy of “Thinking Like A Mountain”….

Rocky Mountain National Park would rather allow Park employees to shoot their over-browsing,  over-abundant elk population instead of bringing in wolves to do what they’ve been doing for hundreds of thousands of years, keeping elk herds healthy and in check. The stupidity of this is mind-boggling.

“Rocky Mountain National Park sometimes has so many elk that they overgraze the vegetation, leaving other animals without enough food and habitat. Few natural predators are left there, and hunting is prohibited, so little remains to keep the elk population in check.

The park launched a 20-year program in 2008 to thin the herd by having park employees and trained volunteers under park supervision periodically shoot and kill elk. The program also includes fences to protect vegetation from elk and redistributing some of the animals.”….The Australian

Park Service employees have shot 131 elk since 2008 and even allow volunteers to join in as well. Sounds like hunting in a National Park to me?

WildEarth Guardians sued the park in 2008, challenging their elk culling program. They lost that challenge and appealed to the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, who is considering the case.

The excuses the park offers, for not introducing wolves to control their burgeoning elk population, are toothless.

“Officials said reintroducing wolves to control elk numbers was infeasible. They cited a lack of support from other agencies, safety concerns of people who live nearby, expected conflicts between wolves and humans and the amount of attention that a wolf population would require of park officials.”…..The Australian

The Tenth Circuit heard arguments from the US Park Service on why wolves were not an option to control the vegetation-elk-munching-population. WildEarth Guardians countered that the wolf option was never given serious consideration or opened for public comment. The Tenth Circuit gave no hint on when they would rule.

We’re living in bizarro world, where up is down and down is up. Wolves are elk’s natural predator, they keep herds, healthy and strong by culling the weak, sick and old.  Yet instead of reintroducing them to RMNP, the US Park Service would rather have an elk cull/hunt.

Many of our national parks are facing the same fate as RMNP, out of control elk and deer populations, which destroy park vegetation. This is due to LACK OF PREDATORS, mainly wolves, who were systematically slaughtered by the US government in cooperation with ranchers in the 1900’s and are now carrying out the same slaughter in the Northern Rockies and soon the Great Lakes if litigation challenging the killing is not successful.

You would think the Park Service would have learned their lesson by now but oh no. We can’t have apex predators controlling their natural prey. That would be too forward thinking. Instead they opt for the elk/hunt cull. Look to Yellowstone for guidance RMNP and see how the park has been re-born, due to the reintroduction of canis lupus.

Someone give these people a copy of Aldo Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac, where he coined the phrase “Thinking Like a Mountain” and describes it this way:

“Aldo Leopold first came up with this term as a result of watching a wolf die off. In those days of Leopold’s adventures, no one would ever pass up killing a wolf because fewer wolves meant more deer, which meant great hunting experiences. However, when Leopold saw the “fierce green fire dying in her eyes” he knew that neither the mountain nor the wolf deserved this. Leopold stated in his book, A Sand County Almanac:

“Since then I have lived to see state after state extirpate its wolves. I have watched the face of many a newly wolfless mountain, and seen the south-facing slopes wrinkle with a maze of new deer trails. I have seen every edible bush and seedling browsed, first to anaemic desuetude, and then to death. I have seen every edible tree defoliated to the height of a saddlehorn … In the end the starved bones of the hoped-for deer herd, dead of its own too-much, bleach with the bones of the dead sage, or molder under the high-lined junipers … So also with cows. The cowman who cleans his range of wolves does not realize that he is taking over the wolf’s job of trimming the herd to fit the change. He has not learned to think like a mountain. Hence we have dustbowls, and rivers washing the future into the sea.”

In this example Leopold shows that the removal of a single species can result in serious negative consequences in an ecosystem. While avoiding trophic cascades is one way to think like a mountain, there are countless other environmental actions that can be categorized under this broad and interconnected concept.”…Wikipedia Commons

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US Park Service defends refusal to use wolves in Rocky Mountain National Park

by:DAN ELLIOTT

From: AP

September 21, 2012 4:54AM

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/breaking-news/us-park-service-defends-refusal-to-use-wolves-in-rocky-mountain-national-park/story-fn3dxix6-1226478520463

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Top Photo: WyoFile

Bottom Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Posted in: Wolf Wars, biodiversity

Tags: Rocky Mountain National Park, closed-minded, over browsing elk herds, National Parks in need of predators, Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, WildEarth Guardians, wolves, trophic cascades, Aldo Leopold, Thinking Like A Mountain, A Sand County Almanac

A Round of Applause…

The endless whining and demonizing of wolves is so mind numbing  it could actually rival the drug Ambien as an effective sleep aid. The same talking points are repeated over and over ad nauseam. That’s why it was so refreshing to read reporter Nick Geovck’s piece in the Mt.Standard. A round of applause to him for having the courage and conviction to speak out about this modern-day witch hunt, directed at wolves and other predators.

He drives his point home by quoting from Aldo Leopold’s famous writing, Thinking Like a Mountain, from a Sand County Almanac. Leopold, who was once a wolf hunter himself, had an epiphany:

“Leopold realizes that killing a predator wolf carries serious implications for the rest of the ecosystem.”

Please take the time to thank Nick Ge0vck by leaving a comment under his excellent article.

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Hatred of predators reaches ridiculous fervor

In the Hunt by Nick Geovck |

Posted: Thursday, January 26, 2012 12:15 am

“Conserva-tion is a state of harmony between men and land. By land is meant all of the things on, over, or in the earth. Harmony with land is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left. That is to say, you cannot love game and hate predators.”

Aldo Leopold

Let’s kill every wolf in Montana.

Sounds like a popular idea these days among hunters.

While we’re at it, let’s kill every grizzly bear, every black bear and every mountain lion. Throw in golden eagles, bald eagles, rattlesnakes and coyotes.

We’d be left with a hunter’s paradise – a state teeming with game animals and hunting opportunity, right?

That’s the sentiment I heard recently at a meeting on the hunting season setting proposals in Butte, where an oft-angry group of sportsmen called for large-scale killing of predators to increase the number of deer, elk and other game species. The suggestions ranged from having government trappers shoot wolves from helicopters to creating a season on eagles so they don’t kill mountain goats.

Of course Butte sportsmen aren’t alone. Over the past few years anger has been building blaming predators – and in particular wolves – for lower game herds and for less hunting opportunity. Wolf haters throw around words like “annihilation” and “devastation” when it comes to Montana’s deer and elk herds. And even some respected conservation groups have gotten in on the wolf bashing through public statements decrying the effects of predators.

What state are these people living in?

Here are a few facts about Montana’s wildlife populations and hunting over the past two decades, covering the period during which the much-maligned western gray wolf has been on the landscape.

In 1992, three years before wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks official estimate of the elk herd was 89,000 elk in Montana. Today we have a statewide estimate of 150,000 elk.

In 2003, the state Legislature passed a bill that required FWP biologists bring elk numbers down to the targeted objective populations laid out in the statewide elk plan. They were responding to complaints from ranchers about too many elk on their private land.

Ironically, some of the same lawmakers who supported that bill are among the most vocal wolf bashers. That hypocrisy begs the question: are there too many elk or too many wolves in Montana?

Anyway, the Legislature in recent years has given FWP several tools to kill more elk, including giving hunters the chance to kill two elk per year.

And since then, Montana has on three occasions extended the general elk season to give hunters two additional weeks to kill elk in years when the harvest was slow.

Second elk tags, extended seasons and liberal regulations allowing more cow elk hunting: where’s the loss of hunting opportunity?

In truth, elk hunters have had more opportunity than in decades and now we’ve seen the effects of that.

Over the past couple years we’ve brought elk back down closer to the target populations or in some cases dropped it below those objective numbers. Accordingly, FWP biologists have gone from liberal to more conservative seasons, allowing fewer cow elk to be killed in many areas and reducing the second tags.

It proves that two-legged predators with high-powered rifles can be extremely effective at killing elk.

Read more: http://mtstandard.com/news/local/hatred-of-predators-reaches-ridiculous-fervor/article_3e418c46-47ba-11e1-b87a-0019bb2963f4.html#ixzz1kelv40FJ

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Photo: Courtesy goukaboutdotcom

Posted in: Wolf Wars

Tags: wolf persecution, wolf hysteria, Mt. Standard, Nick Gevock ,  war on predators

Thinking Like a Mountain …….By Aldo Leopold

A deep chesty bawl echoes from rimrock to rimrock, rolls down the mountain, and fades into the far blackness of the night. It is an outburst of wild defiant sorrow, and of contempt for all the adversities of the world. Every living thing (and perhaps many a dead one as well) pays heed to that call. To the deer it is a reminder of the way of all flesh, to the pine a forecast of midnight scuffles and of blood upon the snow, to the coyote a promise of gleanings to come, to the cowman a threat of red ink at the bank, to the hunter a challenge of fang against bullet. Yet behind these obvious and immediate hopes and fears there lies a deeper meaning, known only to the mountain itself. Only the mountain has lived long enough to listen objectively to the howl of a wolf.

Those unable to decipher the hidden meaning know nevertheless that it is there, for it is felt in all wolf country, and distinguishes that country from all other land. It tingles in the spine of all who hear wolves by night, or who scan their tracks by day. Even without sight or sound of wolf, it is implicit in a hundred small events: the midnight whinny of a pack horse, the rattle of rolling rocks, the bound of a fleeing deer, the way shadows lie under the spruces. Only the ineducable tyro can fail to sense the presence or absence of wolves, or the fact that mountains have a secret opinion about them.

My own conviction on this score dates from the day I saw a wolf die. We were eating lunch on a high rimrock, at the foot of which a turbulent river elbowed its way. We saw what we thought was a doe fording the torrent, her breast awash in white water. When she climbed the bank toward us and shook out her tail, we realized our error: it was a wolf. A half-dozen others, evidently grown pups, sprang from the willows and all joined in a welcoming melee of wagging tails and playful maulings. What was literally a pile of wolves writhed and tumbled in the center of an open flat at the foot of our rimrock.

In those days we had never heard of passing up a chance to kill a wolf. In a second we were pumping lead into the pack, but with more excitement than accuracy: how to aim a steep downhill shot is always confusing. When our rifles were empty, the old wolf was down, and a pup was dragging a leg into impassable slide-rocks.

We reached the old wolf in time to watch a fierce green fire dying in her eyes. I realized then, and have known ever since, that there was something new to me in those eyes – something known only to her and to the mountain. I was young then, and full of trigger-itch; I thought that because fewer wolves meant more deer, that no wolves would mean hunters’ paradise. But after seeing the green fire die, I sensed that neither the wolf nor the mountain agreed with such a view.

Since then I have lived to see state after state extirpate its wolves. I have watched the face of many a newly wolfless mountain, and seen the south-facing slopes wrinkle with a maze of new deer trails. I have seen every edible bush and seedling browsed, first to anaemic desuetude, and then to death. I have seen every edible tree defoliated to the height of a saddlehorn. Such a mountain looks as if someone had given God a new pruning shears, and forbidden Him all other exercise. In the end the starved bones of the hoped-for deer herd, dead of its own too-much, bleach with the bones of the dead sage, or molder under the high-lined junipers.

I now suspect that just as a deer herd lives in mortal fear of its wolves, so does a mountain live in mortal fear of its deer. And perhaps with better cause, for while a buck pulled down by wolves can be replaced in two or three years, a range pulled down by too many deer may fail of replacement in as many decades. So also with cows. The cowman who cleans his range of wolves does not realize that he is taking over the wolf’s job of trimming the herd to fit the range. He has not learned to think like a mountain. Hence we have dustbowls, and rivers washing the future into the sea.

We all strive for safety, prosperity, comfort, long life, and dullness. The deer strives with his supple legs, the cowman with trap and poison, the statesman with pen, the most of us with machines, votes, and dollars,but it all comes to the same thing: peace in our time. A measure of success in this is all well enough, and perhaps is a requisite to objective thinking, but too much safety seems to yield only danger in the long run. Perhaps this is behind Thoreau’s dictum: In wildness is the salvation of the world. Perhaps this is the hidden meaning in the howl of the wolf, long known among mountains, but seldom perceived among men…….

Aldo Leopold

From: A Sand County Almanac 1949

“The seminal essay “Thinking Like a Mountain” recalls another hunting experience later in life that was formative for Leopold’s later views. Here Leopold describes the death of she-wolf killed by his party during a time when conservationists were operating under the assumption that elimination of top predators would make game plentiful. The essay provides a non-technical characterization of the trophic cascade where the removal of single species carries serious implications for the rest of the ecosystem.”

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Lessons from Aldo Leopold’s historic wolf hunt

The nation’s legendary conservationist saw the value of preserving wildness. Perhaps someday politicians will too.

December 13, 2009|By James William Gibson

http://articles.latimes.com/2009/dec/13/opinion/la-oe-gibson13-2009dec13

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Photos: Kewl Wallpaper

Posted in: Biodiversity, gray wolf/canis lupus

Tags: Thinking Like A Mountain, Aldo Leopold, trophic cascades, apex predators

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