Oregon’s Shame – OR4 And His Family Aerial Gunned For The Sacred Cow….

OR4 ODFW

April 3, 2016

Death rained down on OR4 and his family from the ODFW helicopter-death-ships last Thursday, March 31, 2016. I can’t imagine the terror he felt along with his mate, OR39, nicknamed Limpy, due to a damaging leg injury. It was like shooting ducks in a barrel, an old wolf and his crippled mate with their two terrified pups, trying to evade bullets coming from the sky. To me they represent every wolf who has ever been senselessly  killed for the sacred cow. Ranchers know wolves are a miniscule  threat to their bottom line, the main killer of cattle is non-predation, the main predator of cattle are coyotes and domestic dogs.  But facts don’t matter when it comes to wolves, they’re relentlessly demonized.

I can’t tell you the sadness I feel over this killing.  OR4 was a symbol of everything I thought was right about wolves returning to Oregon. He and his first mate, B-300, nicknamed Sophie, swam the Snake River from Idaho to form the first wolf pack to inhabit Oregon in sixty years. They were named the Imnaha Pack. OR4 and B-300 sired many pups, including the legendary OR7 and were the backbone of wolf recovery in Oregon.

Ranching is the single biggest threat to wolves in the Northern Rockies.  Wolves are harassed throughout their lives because of ranching and hunting. They tolerate endless collarings, just as OR4 did. It was a miracle he lived to be 10 years old, a real feat since he had several kill orders out on him during his life. Instead of  Oregon treasuring him for the amazing wolf he was, they filled him full of lead as their final tribute. This killing will forever be Oregon’s shame!

===

Oregon Just Killed a Family of Wolves

Imnaha Pack Alpha Male OR4

TakePart.com 12 hours ago

The bullet he’d been dodging for many years finally caught up with the great Oregon wolf, OR4, on March 31. In the early afternoon, officials from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife shot to death the patriarch of the Imnaha Pack from a helicopter over Wallowa County, an area where gray wolves dispersing from Idaho first began returning to Oregon, where they’d been killed off in the mid-20th century. Shot along with OR4 was his likely pregnant partner, OR 39, known as Limpy for an injured and badly healed leg, and their two pups.

The animals were killed for being presumed guilty of the deaths of four calves and a sheep on private pastureland on the fringes of the pack’s territory in northeast Oregon.

Rob Klavins, who has been a wolf advocate on the frontlines of the cultural and political battles that have accompanied the reemergence of wolves in the West as field coordinator for the conservation group Oregon Wild, heard the helicopters take off and knew the sound spelled doom for OR4. “It was hard for a lot of people,” said Klavins, reached on Friday at his home near the town of Joseph in Wallowa County. “Even some of his detractors had a begrudging respect” for OR4, the fourth wolf to be fitted with a location-tracking radio collar in Oregon. He weighed at least 115 pounds, the largest known wolf in Oregon at the time of his death, and survived for 10 years, three years longer than most wolves in the wild.

OR4 and his progeny have been largely responsible for the gray wolf’s intrepid return to lands where the species was long ago hunted, poisoned, trapped, burned, and otherwise chased nearly to extinction.

Cattle farmers, who receive a subsidy from taxpayers to graze their animals on vast ranges of publicly-owned land where the wolves also dwell, worry about wolves killing their property. Hunters want first shot at the game, such as deer and elk, that wolves favor. But livestock depredations in Oregon are extremely rare, and have become scarcer even as the wolf population has increased. Meanwhile, ODFW’s data shows that Oregon’s wolves are having no effect on elk, deer, and wild sheep populations. Of course, those statistics are small consolation to the rancher who suffered the loss of property in March.

In early 2008, OR4 and his mate at the time, OR2, were among the first wolves to swim the Snake River, scale enormous mountains, and establish a foothold for wolves in game-rich Wallowa County. Since then, more than 110 Oregon wolves have spread from the remote northeast corner of the state, over the Cascades, and to near the California border. Many of these pioneering wolves were spawned by OR4.

Beginning with his first pack in 2009, OR4 fathered, provided for, and protected dozens of wolf pups that survived in the Oregon wild—and made their way all the way south to California, where OR7, known as the “lone wolf, trekked in 2012. Today, OR7 has his own pack in the California-Oregon border region. The alpha female of the Shasta pack—the first gray wolf pack to make California home since 1924—is the offspring of OR4.

That OR4 lasted this long is source of wonder to those who have followed his starring role in Oregon’s gray-wolf comeback story. In 2011, a brief cattle-killing spree by the Imnaha pack had him slated for execution. A suit by Oregon Wild and other conservation groups stayed the execution order and OR4 settled into a mostly incident-free life as Oregon’s biggest and baddest-ass wolf.

There is good reason to believe OR4 was cast out of his pack early this year, and his decision to move into livestock calving ground was borne of the need of an old, slowing, and dull-toothed male—no longer able to bring down elk—to fend for his hobbled mate, to whom he was endearingly loyal, and his yearling pups.

“He was an outlaw wolf with a heart of gold,” said Amaroq Weiss, the West Coast Wolf Coordinator for the Center for Biological Diversity. Weiss recalled a 2009 video of OR4 leading his Imnaha pack up a snowy mountainside as a defining image from the early days of Oregon’s wolf recovery. “He was definitely a father figure.”

The Shasta Pack that is part of OR’s legacy will soon be coming into its second litter. It is protected by the California Endangered Species Act. In Oregon, though, wolves were removed from the endangered species list in November, which allowed OR4’s pack to be shot to death Thursday. Activists have sued to re-list the animals.

The wolf management plan that provided the legal justification for the killing of OR4, Limpy, and their pups is up for review in Oregon this year. The state has determined that the wolf population met benchmarks that allow livestock producers more lethal options when dealing with depredating wolves. Klavins and others would like to make sure the updated plan calls for every non-lethal option to be exhausted before wolves are killed.

“What was done [Thursday] was sufficient for an agency that views wildlife as agents of damage and whose primary job is to protect private interests at taxpayer expense,” Klavins said. “But it’s not good enough for a public agency whose mission is to ‘protect and enhance Oregon’s fish and wildlife and their habitats for use and enjoyment by present and future generations,’ ” he continued, quoting from the agency’s official documents. “They need to do better. Oregonians deserve better.”

Wolf advocate Wally Sykes is one of the few to have encountered OR4 in the wild. “I was kind of initially prepared for something to happen, but the visual image of an old wolf being hunted down by a helicopter, with his hobbling mate by his side and his two freaked out pups along with him, is an ugly picture to carry in your head,” said. He said officials he spoke with were “not at all happy to have killed these wolves.” Sykes’ recording of OR4’s howl can be heard here.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/oregon-just-killed-family-wolves-181546732.html

===

Nov. 12, 2009

In happier times! ODFW caught the ten member Imnaha wolf pack walking single file through the eastern Oregon woods with at least six pups!! Leading the pack is alpha female B-300.

===

Posted in Oregon wolves, Wolf Wars

Photo: ODFW

Tags: OR4, OR39 (Limpy), ODFW, aerial gunning, shooting innocent wolves, OR7, Take Part, animal cruelty, Wolf wars, death of a Legend, Oregon Wild, B-300 (Sophie), Imnaha wolf pack,

Wildlife Agencies In The Bag For Hunters – Time For A Change

Gray wolf pinterest 1

Time for Wildlife Agencies to Protect Animals, Not Kill Them

In January, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game sent a helicopter into the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness to radio-collar wolves. This incursion violated the rules of the federally protected wilderness area. It also broke the department’s own agreement with the federal government, dating from a prior violation in which Fish and Game sent a trapper into the protected area to exterminate wolves. By the time conservationists filed suit in that 2013 incident, nine wolves in two packs were already dead.

 Idaho Fish and Game is, let’s be frank, an outlaw agency. It regards killing wolves as part of its sacred duty to protect elk for hunters. The agency is apparently clueless about the abundant evidence that strong predators make strong habitats and strong prey.

But let’s not pick on Idaho. What happened there fit seamlessly with the entire long history of wildlife agencies manipulating the environment for the benefit of hunters. In truth, that kind of game management dates back at least to Charlemagne and Genghis Khan, and it persists today in the names and the mind-set of the many wildlife agencies that still call themselves fish and game departments.

Predator control tends to get the headlines. But these agencies also engage in large-scale alterations of the landscape—by clearing forests, conducting prescribed burns, building water catchments, removing shrubs from wetlands, and other means—to benefit game animals, with little or no regard for how this will affect all the other non-game species living in that habitat. And the habitat in question is huge. In Scotland, for instance, 58 percent of the total land area is managed for hunting, mostly upland birds. In Slovenia, it’s 94 percent of the total land area.

The widespread character of this land management caught the attention of Travis Gallo, a doctoral candidate in conservation biology at Colorado State University. He was also interested in how much money goes into game management, especially compared to what other nongame species get. Hunting licenses in the United States contributed $790 million to wildlife programs in 2013, and special duties and taxes on hunting gear, via the Wildlife Restoration Act, added another $550 million.

Gallo’s original idea was that, even if this funding results in a one-sided focus on game animals, there might be inadvertent benefits for nongame wildlife too. Like a lot of people in Colorado, he’s a hunter himself, for deer and elk, and “I really wanted to find some synergy,” he said. What he found instead, he reports in a new study in the journal Biological Conservation, is that hardly anybody even bothers to ask the question.

A broad search of the scientific literature revealed just 26 studies “that directly evaluated the effect of game management practices on non-targeted wildlife.” The effect was positive 40 percent of the time and negative 37 percent of the time, more or less what you would expect by chance.

On the positive side, for example, wildlife agencies removed shrubs from wetlands in the Great Lakes to create habitat for sharp-tailed grouse, a game bird. But that inadvertently also benefited birds like LeConte’s sparrow and the sage wren, which also require open wetland habitat. Water catchments in Arizona turned out to benefit native bats more than the mule deer and other game species for which they were intended. On the negative side, the United Kingdom manages habitat for fallow deer, roe deer, and the Reeves’s muntjac (a deer species native to China), and this inadvertently causes sharp declines in native British birds such as the common nightingale, the willow warbler, and the chiffchaff. Managing for overabundant elk at the National Elk Refuge in Wyoming nibbles down cover that would otherwise harbor migratory shorebirds and songbirds.

In the new study, Gallo and his coauthor, Liba Pejchar, note up front that they aren’t “advocating that hunting be reduced or prohibited on either public or private lands.” They rightly note that a lot of habitat and species now survive only because of hunters. In the United States, big game hunters launched the conservation movement in the late 19th century, just in time to save the bison from extinction. They drove through the passage of the Lacey Act, which remains our fundamental law against illegal wildlife and plant trafficking. They played a major role in creating some of our most important national parks.

But that doesn’t mean the hook-and-bullet mentality should be ruling our wildlife agencies today, if only as a matter of their own self-preservation. The number of people identifying themselves as hunters (and paying those license fees) is sharply declining, down to just 13.7 million in 2012. But in the same survey, 71.8 million Americans said they were wildlife watchers. One way to get wildlife agencies to broaden their focus to nongame animals would be for those wildlife watchers to begin to take over the funding. That is, you and I should be stepping up to pay a special wildlife tax on our binoculars and our birdfeeders, the way hunters do on their guns.  That was the gist of the Teaming With Wildlife Act of 2009, but it went nowhere in Congress.

The other important take-home message from the new study, said Gallo, is that wildlife agencies need to do real science on how game management impacts nongame species. In particular, they need to investigate the likely compounding effect when they combine outdated predator control programs with unscientific habitat manipulations.

That is, wildlife agencies need to grow up, stop distorting the landscape for the recreational interests of one narrow interest group, and start practicing holistic management for the benefit of entire ecosystems.

http://news.yahoo.com/time-wildlife-agencies-protect-animals-not-kill-them-165133283.html

elk-hunter

“Time for Wildlife Agencies to Protect Animals, Not Kill Them”

===

Please sign and share!

Keep Wolves Protected, and Defend the Endangered Species Act

http://takeaction.takepart.com/actions/keep-wolves-protected-and-defend-the-endangered-species-act?cmpid=tp-rss

===

Posted in: Gray wolf, Wolf Wars Animal Cruelty

Top Photo: Gray wolf Pinterest

Bottom Photo: Takepartdotcom

Tags: Wildlife agencies, killing not saving, hunters, wildlife watchers, wolves, IDFG, animal cruelty

More Animal Killing and Butchering at Heartless Denmark Zoos

Giraffe_publically_killed_and_chopped_at_the_Copenhagen_Zoo.jpg Wiki

Sweet Marius murdered and then butchered in front of school children at Copenhagen Zoo in February 2014

Remember when the Copenhagen zoo murdered poor 18 month old Marius the giraffe, because they determined he wasn’t genetically important to the gene pool? They lured that poor baby, who had trusted those zoo keepers all his life and killed him. Then to add insult to injury they dissected him in front of school children and fed his body parts to the lions. Are they disgusting human beings or what?

Now round two is about to happen in the Odense zoo in Denmark. They killed a lion about nine months ago, because according to them they had too many lions. Hey morons, find another home for the lion, don’t kill it. But no, they didn’t find a home for the lion, just like the Copenhagen zoo rejected all the offers from other organizations to take Marius and give him a home. So the Odense zoo is planning on dissecting this lion, whom they’ve kept frozen the past nine months and dissect it in front of school children. Lets’ forget the word dissect and just call it what it is, butchering.  Talk about  desensitising children to animal murder. They’re doing a wonderful job over there in Denmark. These people shouldn’t be running zoos. Those animals were entrusted to them to care for and yet they heartlessly murder them.

Boycott this zoo!!

giraffe-rip-marius_reuters_keldnavntoft_scanpixdenmark

Sweet doomed Marius: Reuters_keldnavntoft_scanpixdenmark

Marc Bekoff, Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, said:

“The cold justification for these killings offered by zoo workers chilled and scared me. Furthermore, these easily avoidable deaths, perversely justified “in the name of conservation,” are horrible lessons for youngsters and run counter to global programs in humane education and compassionate conservation.”

===

Danish zoo to dissect lion in front of children ‘for education’

A lion at Odense Zoo Flickr Martin Borjesson

A Lion At Odense Zoo in Denmark

http://news.yahoo.com/giraffe-danish-children-watch-lion-dissection-001122611.html

===

Top photo: AFP Photo/Kasper Palsnov

Middle Photo: Reuters_keldnavntoft_scanpixdenmark

Bottom Photo: Flickr: Martin Borjesson

Posted in: Animal Cruelty

Tags: Odense Zoo, Denmark, boycott Odense Zoo, animal cruelty, animal murder, heartless, polluting children’s minds, butchering zoo animals

Ricky Gervais Blasts Trophy Hunters…..

Trophy hunting a giraffe_Random storydotorg

Ricky Gervais is having none of trophy hunters BS they like to throw around, to defend their indefensible behavior and blood lust by killing innocent animals for sport.

Keep it up Ricky, you have their number and the courage and platform to call them out. Trophy hunting is not a sport, its animal cruelty and should be banned worldwide.

“These psycho trophy hunters always have stuff about their family being everything to them on their profiles. Elephants love their family  too.”…..Ricky Gervais Tweet April 18th 2015

===

Ricky Gervais blasts trophy hunters trying to excuse ‘grim sport’ by saying they ‘provide a service’

 
Comedian has been embroiled in a debate over hunting
 Wednesday 22 April 2015

Ricky Gervais has condemned trophy hunters for “exploiting the needs of the poor” following a protracted debate over hunting sparked by the controversial activities of female huntress Rebecca Francis.

Francis had accused Gervais of targeting her specifically because she was female after the comedian posted a picture of her lying next to the corpse of a giraffe she had just killed with the caption: “What must’ve happened to you in your life to make you want to kill a beautiful animal and then lie next to it smiling?”

Francis was subsequently bombarded with furious messages and death threats on social media accounts belonging to her. A few days later, she responded in a defiant statement vowing to never apologise for hunting, where she claimed Gervais “used his power and influence to specifically target women in the hunting industry and has sparked thousands of people to call for my death, the death of my family and many other women who hunt”.

The picture Gervais posted of Francis 

The mother-of-eight from the US insisted hunters contribute “the most” to the welfare of wildlife by helping create a natural balance.

Gervais later denied her claims of sexism, insisting in a tweet: “men and women that do it [trophy hunt] are equally vile and worthless”.

He has continued the debate over hunting on his social media accounts, where he today said he was “sick” of Trophy Hunters “trying to excuse their grim sport by saying they provide a service”.

In a lengthy Facebook post, Gervais wrote: “They exploit the needs of the poor. They pay lots of money to go and shoot a magnificent animal because the authorities need the cash, and then claim they are doing a good deed. It’s not a good deed.

Rebecca Francis on one of her hunts

Rebecca Francis on one of her hunts

“Those authorities would rather have the money and the animal still alive but they can’t afford to. So they’re forced to take money from rich psychopaths who get their cheap f*****g thrills from shooting a giraffe or elephant in the head.

“If they were providing a service they would be the ones being paid. Imagine a vet paying you to put down your dog and then taking a selfie next to the corpse. And as for “the money goes to saving their remaining animals”, oh dear. Where will it end? Can you pay more to kill the leopard with a hammer if that’s your perversion? They’re already killing with bows and arrows for f***s sake.

“And would we allow some billionaire sicko to shoot one cancer patient if he gave a million dollars to cancer research? No. Of course we f*****g wouldn’t. If they really wanted to do a good deed they would donate the money, and not shoot the animal. They would be heroes then. As opposed to murdering scum.”

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/ricky-gervais-blasts-trophy-hunters-trying-to-excuse-grim-sport-by-saying-they-provide-a-service-10195455.html

===

“Animals don’t have a voice, but I do. A loud one. I’m a f….g big mouth. My voice is for them. And I’ll never shut up while they suffer.” ~ Ricky Gervais

===

Top Photo: Courtesy Randomstorydotorg

Middle Photos: Courtesy The Independent

Posted in: Animal Cruelty, Trophy Hunting,  Animal Rights

Tags: animal cruelty, trophy hunting not a sport, Ricky Gervais

426 Wolves Wiped Out in 2014 and It’s Not Over…

Wolf Family fanpop

Update: November 21, 2014

443 wolves killed 2014

===

 November 18, 2014

blood drip 2

426 wolves have been wiped out since the beginning of 2014. Pups, alphas, whole packs, gone. The majority have been slaughtered in the ongoing  Idaho, Montana, Minnesota and Wisconsin wolf hunts. 17 wolves were killed in Wyoming’s “predator zone” before a federal judge recently relisted them. 3 wolves were killed in Washington state, even though they’re “protected” there. The Huckleberry Pack alpha female was shot by a WDFW sharpshooter from the air, the alpha female of the Teanaway Pack and a female wolf from the Smackout Pack, were both poached.  And I’m not even counting wolves killed by Wildlife Services this year or wolves killed in the 2014 part of the 2013/2014 hunts. That would push the total much higher.

The saddest part of all this are the hunts are far from over. Wildlife Services killings are not over.

This has to stop, we are traveling down that long, dark road of wolf eradication.

Please don’t give up on wolves, be their voice!  Speak out for them, they’re suffering, in the cold, in traps, shot, snared, torn from their families! We must work to end this nightmare! We are their only voice!

For the wolves, For the wild ones,

Nabekiblood drop

Wisconsin Sinks To New Low..

Desportes_wolf

We all know Wisconsin is allowing trophy hunters to chase down wolves with dogs. It was challenged in the courts by humane organizations who recognize this for what it is, cruelty, pure and simple.  An appeals court recently ruled  the state can go forward with this disgusting, ugly practice, essentially sanctioning  dog fighting.

Wisconsin is gaining the reputation as Idaho east, except even Idaho, as brutal as their policies are toward wolves, don’t allow this. Just wondering how these so-called Wisconsin “hunters” would like to be chased down by dogs?  They wouldn’t be so “brave” then, now would they?

BOYCOTT WISCONSIN!!

 ===

LETTER: Wisconsin has poor version of ethical hunting

July 23, 2014 3:03 pm  • 

Black bears should no longer feel solely terrorized and persecuted by hound hunters in training activities; the gray wolf has now joined their ranks.

Here’s how hound training on both bears and wolves works: Bear baiting begins April 15, 111 days longer than the six other states still allowing pre-season bear baiting. Gallons of sweet treats are dumped in our woods to habituate bears and newborn cubs into showing up at dumping sites daily. After three months of getting fat on sweet treats, July 1 the rules and their world changes. Now packs of hounds are released into the woods from baiting stations or on a bear track crossing the road and the chase is on.

These chases can last for hours and cover up to 10-plus miles while hunters stay on the roads and drive from one block of woods to the next while following hounds on GPS, who are running their quarry to exhaustion. If cubs are lucky they make it to a tree before the hounds; some are not so lucky.

Now add wolves and wolf pups who, unlike bears, are now being run down by an unlimited number of hounds for 24 hours a day, 365 days a year with no license required. Contrary to what the DNR and hound hunters state, walking up to a dog and wolf fight to put a leash on dogs while skipping home unscathed is far from the truth. Poaching of wolves will be rampant.

Bear hounds are bred to be tough and fight, but history tells us they are no match for a wolf as $500,000-plus in depredation payments have gone to hound hunters. This is canine against canine. In less than one minute a wolf can either break the neck or back of a bear hound or disembowel and rip it’s hide off. In the 20 minutes to an hour that it takes the hunters to make it from their trucks to the fight in the woods, how many hounds, wolves and wolf pups at rendezvous sites will already be dead? Since there is no limit on number of hounds on wolves, maybe 12 to 18 hounds on one wolf will get the upper hand?

Make no mistake, this will be brutal. Thank you, Wisconsin legislators, for Act 169.

Click here for link

===

 Wis. Court: Hunters Can Train Dogs On Wolves

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A state appeals court ruled Thursday that hunters can train dogs to chase down wolves, rejecting arguments from a group of humane societies that wildlife officials are allowing deadly wolf-dog clashes and cementing one of the most contentious elements of Wisconsin wolf hunting.
Click here to read more:
===

Is Trophy Hunting a Form of Serial Killing? By Gareth Patterson

Lion expert and conservationist Gareth Patterson takes aim

“For me – and the many people who contact me to offer their support – killing innocent animals for self-gratification is no different from killing innocent people for self-gratification. By extension, then, trophy hunting – the repeated killing of wild animals – should surely be viewed as serial killing. And in the same moral light humanity’s thinking is, I feel, beginning to approach such a level of morality.

What are the comparisons between trophy hunting and serial killing?

To attempt to answer this question, I did some research into the gruesome subject of serial killing. I learnt firstly that serial murder is a grotesque habit which analysts regard as addictive. Serial murder, I learnt, is about power and control – both linked to the killers’ longing to “be important”.

It appears when the serial killer commits the first act of murder, he experiences feelings such as revulsion and remorse, but the killing – like a dose of highly addictive drug – leads to more and more murders until the person is stopped. Researchers have discovered that serial murderers experience a cooling-off period after a killing, but as with a drug craving, the compulsion – the need to kill – keeps building up until the killer heads out again in search of another victim.

Trophy hunters are mostly “repeat” killers. This is further fueled by elite trophy hunting competitions. It has been calculated that in order for a hunter to win these competitions in all categories at the highest level, he would have to kill at least 322 animals.

Pornography is perceived by analysts as a factor that contributes toward serial killers’ violent fantasies – particularly “bondage-type” pornography portraying domination and control over a victim.

Hunting magazines contain page after page of (a) pictures of hunters, weapon in hand, posing in dominating positions over their lifeless victims, (b) advertisements offering a huge range of trophy hunts, and (c) stories of hunters’ “exciting” experience of “near misses” and danger.

These pages no doubt titillate the hunter, fueling his own fantasies and encouraging him to plan more and more trophy hunts.

Trophy hunters often hire a camera person to film their entire hunt in the bush, including the actual moments when animals are shot and when they die. These films are made to be viewed later, presumably for self-gratification and to show to other people – again the need to feel “important”?

This could also be seen as a form of trophy which mirrors in some respect pornographic “snuff” videos known to be made by some serial killers. Other serial killers have tape-recorded the screams of their victims, which were kept for later self-gratification.

There is a strong urge to achieve perceived “heroism” in serial murderers. This is linked to the individual’s craving for “self-esteem”. Student Robert Smith, for example, who in November 1996 walked into a beauty parlour in Mesa, Arizona, and shot five women and two children in the back of the heads, said of his motivation to kill: “I wanted to become known, to get myself a name”.

Multiple killer Cari Panzram (among whose victims were six Africans he shot in the back “for fun” while working for an oil company in Africa) once stated of his actions: “I reform people”. When asked how, he replied: “By killing them”. Panzram also liked to describe himself as “the man who goes around doing good”.

The “Stockwell Strangler” of South London in the mid-1980s who told police he wanted to be famous is another example of how the serial killer clearly confuses notoriety for fame.

Are the trophy hunter’s killings linked to the serial killer’s addiction to murder, to achieve what is perceived to be heroism, to deep-rooted low self-esteem, to wanting to be famous – the “name in the trophy book”?

Certainly one could state that, like the serial killer, the trophy hunter plans his killing with considerable care and deliberation. Like the serial killer he decides well in advance the “type” of victim – i.e. which species he intends to target. Also, like the serial killer, the trophy hunter plans with great care where and how the killing will take place – in what area, with what weapon.

What the serial killer and trophy hunter also share is a compulsion to collect “trophies” or “souvenirs” of their killings. The serial killer retains certain body parts or other “trophies … for much the same reason as the big game hunter mounts the head and antlers taken from his prey … as trophies of the chase,” according to Colin Wilson and Donald Seaman in The Serial Killers, a book on the psychology of violence.

In The Serial Killers, the authors wrote about Robert Hansen, an Alaska businessman and big-game enthusiast who hunted naked prostitutes through the snow as though they were wild animals, then shot them dead. Hansen would point a gun at his victim, order her to take off all her clothes, and then order her to run. He would give his victims a “start” before stalking them. The actual act of killing his victims, Hansen once said, was an “anti-climax” and that “the excitement was in the stalking”.

How many times have I heard trophy hunters describing their actions in similar terms? “No, hunting isn’t just about killing,” they say. “It’s also about the stalk, the build-up to the kill”.

Hansen was a trophy hunter, who, according to Wilson and Seaman, had achieved “celebrity by killing a Dall sheep with a crossbow”. He also trophy hunted women but, as a married man with a family, he couldn’t put his human trophies next to those elk antlers and bear skins in his den.

As an alternative, Hansen, it was revealed, took items of jewelry from his victims as “trophies” and hid these in his loft so that, as with his animal trophies, he, the hunter, could relive his fantasy-inspired killings whenever he wished to.

According to Wilson and Seaman, Jack the Ripper cut off one victim’s nose and breasts and “as if they were trophies, displayed them on a bedside table, together with strips of flesh carved from her thighs”.

Jewellery, body parts, clothing such as underwear and so on, are all known “trophies” of the serial killer. One serial killer flayed his victim and made a waistcoat from the skin as a “souvenir” or “trophy”.

What could the non-hunting wives, girlfriends, brothers, sisters, mothers, fathers and children reveal of the nature and behavior of a hunter in the family? Could they reveal that the hunter had a very disturbed childhood?

Almost half the serial killers analyzed during behavioral research were found to have been sexually abused in childhood. Environmental problems early in life manifest in many cases in violence such as cruelty to animals. Maybe they have a frustrated craving for “self-esteem”, a deep desire to be recognized, a resentment against society? All these factors are some of the known links to the profile of the serial killer.

Lastly, serial killing has been described as a “20th-Century phenomenon”. The same could be said of Western trophy hunting in Africa.”

http://www.bushdrums.com/index.php/forum/topic/574-is-trophy-hunting-a-form-of-serial-killing-by-g-patterson

 ===

 Photo: Wikimedia Commons

 Posted in: Wolf Wars, Animal Cruelty
Tags: Gareth Patterson, trophy hunting/serial killing link?, Wisconsin, bear hunters, wolf hunters, animal cruelty

Who Needs “Old Highly Endangered Black Rhinos” Anyway?

Black Rinos in Ngorongoro Crater Wiki

Black rhinos in Ngorongoro crater

The fury continues over the  endangered black rhino that Corey Knowlton paid $350,000 to slaughter in Namibia, because after all the endangered black rhino is an old guy and who needs old endangered black rhinos anyway?

Bob Barker, host of the Price is Right and passionate animal rights activist, wrote an open letter to the Dallas Safari Club, who held the auction that allowed Knowlton to purchase a permit, issued by Namibia, to murder one of less than 5000 black rhino’s left in the world. Oh but don’t forget, that rhino’s life means nothing because he’s old!

===

Bob Barker Urges Safari Club Not to Auction Off License to Kill Older Male Rhino

 For Immediate Release

January 10, 2014

Contact:
Moira Colley 202-483-7382

Dallas, Texas – As the Dallas Safari Club prepares to auction off a license to kill an endangered black rhinoceros in Namibia—a much-criticized move that the club has defended by explaining that it will preselect an animal who is “old and unable to reproduce”—TV icon Bob Barker has fired off a letter urging the club to call off the auction, writing, “As an older male myself, I must say that this seems like rather a harsh way of dealing with senior citizens.” Barker goes on to point out that killing an endangered animal for money is no way to fight poaching (that is, killing endangered animals for money).

Bob Barker’s letter to the Dallas Safari Club is available below.

Ben Carter, Executive Director
The Dallas Safari Club
13709 Gamma Rd.
Dallas, TX 75244

 Dear Mr. Carter:

I am writing to ask you to call off your planned auction of a chance to kill an endangered black rhino in Namibia. The rhino that your organization reportedly has in its crosshairs is an older “non-breeding” male who has apparently been deemed expendable. As an older male myself, I must say that this seems like a rather harsh way of dealing with senior citizens.

I can certainly sympathize with this animal’s plight (and I would think that many of your older members could as well). How many seniors have been written off simply because they have a certain number of birthdays under their belts? But just because you’re “retired” doesn’t mean you don’t have anything more to offer. In fact, I personally feel that I’ve accomplished a great deal since I quit my day job. Surely, it is presumptuous to assume that this rhino’s life is no longer of any value. What of the wisdom that he has acquired over the course of a long life? What’s the world coming to when a lifetime’s experience is considered a liability instead of an asset?

There are only about 5,000 black rhinos still alive in Africa. What kind of message does it send when we put a $1 million bounty on one of their heads? These animals are endangered for that very reason: money. What makes you any better than the poachers who kill rhinos to feed their families? At least, they are honest about their less noble motives. You try to dress up greed under the guise of “conservation.”

True conservationists are those who pay money to keep rhinos alive—in the form of highly lucrative eco-tourism—as opposed to those who pay money for the cheap thrill of taking this magnificent animal’s life and putting his head on a wall.

If you want someone’s head to go on a wall, pick mine. I will happily send you an autographed photo to auction off instead. My mug may not fetch as much money as that of a dead rhino, but at least we’ll all live to enjoy another sunrise in our sunset years.

Sincerely,

Bob Barker

For more information, please visit PETA.org.

Read more: http://www.peta.org/media/news-releases/bob-barker-urges-safari-club-auction-license-kill-older-male-rhino/#ixzz2qye3ugeT
===
Black Rhino chewing on plants Wiki

Black Rhino chewing on plants – I’m sure the critically endangered black rhino, targeted for death, would rather be doing this!

Wayne Pacelle, president of the Humane Society, has stated if Knowlton does in fact kill the rhino, HSUS will try to block Knowlton from bringing the rhino “trophy” back to the US. That would be some justice but I think the rhino would prefer to live out the rest of his life in peace instead of being hunted and murdered.

“The Humane Society opposed the Dallas Safari Club Auction and says it plans to fight Knowlton’s efforts to bring the black rhino trophy into the United States.

If Knowlton does hunt and kill the black rhino, he’ll need a special permit from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to import the animal into the country under the Endangered Species Act.

Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of The Humane Society, wrote in an online blog post that killing one endangered animal to save the species is an “Orwellian idea” and worries that it will inspire hunters to pay millions of dollars for the chance to kill orangutans, elephants or tigers.

“Where will it end?” wrote Pacelle. “The first rule of protecting the rarest animals in the world is to protect each living member of that species.”

http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/16/us/black-rhino-hunting-permit/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

===

Meanwhile, American wolves continue to be trapped, tortured and slain in the US and their deaths haven’t garnered one/thousandth the outrage  the black rhino’s plight has. Still I’m glad to see people waking up and realizing the brutality and senselessness of trophy hunting.  It’s all about respect you know. Corey Knowlton says he respects the Rhino. Yes, he respects the Rhino alright, right to his grave.

Black Rhino Skull Wiki

Corey Knowlton says he’s getting death threats and has hired a security firm for protection.  The “old endangered black rhino” should hire bodyguards too for protection, since his life is in mortal danger. It’s not fun being a hunted animal. Pot meet kettle!

===

Posted in: Trophy hunting, Slob Hunters, Animal Cruelty

Photos: Courtesy Wikipedia

Tags: Endangered Black Rhino, Trophy Hunting, Namibia, Corey Knowlton, $350,000 for a life, Dallas Safari Club, Bob Barker, PETA, Wayne Pacelli, Humane Society of the United States, animal cruelty

Press Release CBD: Trapped Idaho Wolf Tortured Before Killing…

Photo from trapperman.com posting

For Immediate Release, April 3, 2012

Trapped Idaho Wolf Tortured Before Killing 

Attorney General, Forest Service Asked to Investigate Violations of State Cruelty Law and 

Forest Service Ethics

BOISE, Idaho— The Center for Biological Diversity sent letters to both the Forest Service and Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden, today requesting investigations into the actions of a Forest Service employee, Josh Bransford, who posted photos of a wolf he had trapped in northern Idaho that had been maliciously and non-fatally shot by people who spotted the animal from a nearby road.

“A year ago, that wolf was protected as a member of an endangered species, but last month he was trapped, tortured and killed thanks to an underhanded congressional rider that’s also responsible for the deaths of hundreds of other wolves in the northern Rocky Mountains,” said the Center’s Michael Robinson. “A lack of respect for the balance of nature is leading to a war on wolves in the northern Rocky Mountains .”

The posting, on trapperman.com, shows the Forest Service employee smiling in front of a still-living wolf surrounded by snow that is bloody from the animal’s gunshot wounds. Idaho state law makes it a crime for a person who “causes or procures any animal to be cruelly treated, or who, having the charge or custody of any animal either as owner or otherwise, subjects any animal to cruelty.” It also requires that “destruction of animals for population control” (the supposed reason for wolf trapping) be carried out humanely. Making it possible for potshots to be taken at a captive animal — and photographing the results — before ending the wolf’s suffering appears to violate this law, as well as common decency.

“These photos make plain that the trapping and hunting of wolves being allowed by the state of Idaho are less ‘wildlife-management techniques’ than scapegoating of wolves,” said Robinson. “This egregious torture of a wolf needs to be investigated by Idaho ’s attorney general and the Forest Service, and Josh Bransford should be fined and dismissed from his position.”

Removal of Endangered Species Act protection for the wolf was premised on the fact that state game agencies could be counted on to manage wolves. Idaho has since abandoned the targets of its state plan and instead said it will seek to reduce the population from roughly 1,000 wolves to as low as 150 wolves, effectively creating an open season on the species. So far, 375 wolves have been reported killed in Idaho and 166 in Montana . Idaho ’s wolf hunt remains open in portions of the state.

“The disturbing photos of this animal’s needlessly painful death are a symbol of the loss of hundreds of wolves in Idaho and Montana and the unraveling of their ecosystems as a consequence,” said Robinson. “Last year’s wolf-delisting rider was premised on trusting the states to treat wolves like other wildlife. But that trust was clearly misplaced by Congress.

Without the safety net of the Endangered Species Act, Idaho ’s very clearly persecuting wolves, not ‘managing’ them. It’s brutal and it has to stop.”

Michael J. Robinson
Center for Biological Diversity
www.biologicaldiversity.org

===

Howling for Justice Statement

 Yes, it has to stop. Our ultimate goal is to see wolves relisted. It’s obvious the states are not capable of caring for wolves. Idaho is conducting a cruel vendetta against them, worse than the first  Western extermination. We have learned nothing, the same backward, base, hateful attitudes are driving this wolf killing train.

Congress should hang their heads in shame for legislating away wolves’ ESA protections and opening them up to unspeakable torture and brutality!!

===

Photo: Courtesy Center for Biological Diversity

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Animal Cruelty, Idaho Wolves

Tags: Animal cruelty, tortured wolf, US Forest Service

Trapped, Tortured Wolf Did Not Die In Vain….

A trapper posing for the camera  with a  wounded wolf in the background caught in  a leghold trap  (Photo Courtesy Earth Island Journal)

The picture has now become iconic. A beautiful, black wolf, caught in a leghold trap, wounded, STILL ALIVE, blood soaking the snow around him, holding his injured foot off the ground, with the face of a trapper mugging for the camera.

The situation had become something of an arena sport because the trapped wolf was shot at by “hunters” just  having a little “fun”??  What a blast (pun intended) that must have been for them to fire on a trapped, defenseless animal?  Right?? Whoever shot at that wolf should be charged with a crime, this was animal torture and cruelty at its worst.  BUT, was what they did anymore cruel than trapping the wolf in the first place? Who knows how long he’d been tethered to that trap without food or water, frightened, shot and bleeding?

Initially the photo was downloaded from a trapping website and  posted on Footloose Montana’s Facebook page, which received hundreds of comments. On Monday Footloose received a vile, threatening email which prompted them to contact the authorities.

As sad as this story is the picture exposed the cruelty and torture of  the wolf for all to see, having the opposite effect of that which it was intended.  His image has become the face of the repulsive, ugly practice of trapping. It’s not a sport, it’s  medieval torment that belongs in the 5th century,  NOT in a civilized society.

  With his suffering exposed, will this animal’s tragic final moments on earth, caught on camera, finally be the  wake up call for America to say NO MORE??

===

Photos of live, trapped wolf prompt threats to Missoula-based group

March 29, 2012
Written By John S. Adams

HELENA — A Missoula-based anti-trapping organization said it received a threatening email this month after the group posted graphic photos on the Internet of a live Idaho wolf caught in a foot-hold trap.

READ MORE:

http://www.greatfallstribune.com/article/20120330/NEWS01/203300316/Photos-live-trapped-wolf-prompt-threats-Missoula-based-group?odyssey=tab

===

The Predator Persecution Complex

The Perverse Logic of Wolf Hunts

by GEORGE WUERTHNER
The hysteria that surrounds wolf management in the Rockies has clouded rational discussion.  Wolves are hardly a threat to either hunting opportunity or the livestock industry.

ELK NUMBERS ABOVE OBJECTIVES

For instance, the Wyoming Fish and Game reports: “The Department continues to manage to reduce Wyoming’s elk numbers. The total population of the herds with estimates increased by 16 percent in 2009 and is now 29 percent above the statewide objective of 83,640 animals.”

Things are similar in Montana. Populations have grown from an estimated 89,000 animals in 1992 prior to wolf recovery to 140,000-150,000 animals in recent years.

In Idaho we find a similar trend. According to the IDFG 23 out of 29 elk units are at and/or above objective. Hunter success in 2011 was 20%: one in five hunters killed an elk.

Wolves are clearly not a threat to the future of hunting in any of these states.

READ MORE:

http://www.counterpunch.org/2012/03/30/the-perverse-logic-of-wolf-hunts/

===

Wolf Torture and Execution Continues in the Northern Rockies

by James William Gibson – March 28, 2012

Montana Anti-Trapping Group Gets Death Threat for Releasing Photos

On March 16, a Friday, a US Forest Service employee from Grangeville, Idaho, laid out his wolf traps. The following Monday, using the name “Pinching,” he posted his story and pictures on www.Trapperman.com . “I got a call on Sunday morning from a FS [Forest Service] cop that I know. You got one up here as there was a crowd forming. Several guys had stopped and taken a shot at him already,” wrote Pinching. The big, black male wolf stood in the trap, some 300-350 yards from the road, wounded—the shots left him surrounded by blood-stained snow. Pinching concluded his first post, “Male that went right at 100 pounds. No rub spots on the hide, and he will make me a good wall hanger.”

READ MORE:

http://www.earthisland.org/journal/index.php/elist/eListRead/wolf_torture_and_execution_continues_in_the_northern_rockies/

===

Photo: Courtesy Earth Island Journal

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Trapping Wolves, Animal Cruelty

Tags: Animal cruelty, animal torture, evils of trapping, suffering wolf, Footloose Montana, Earth Island Journal, Great Falls Tribunedotcom

Trapping And Killing Wolves With A Smile….

warning graphic videos

These two are having themselves a great time, snaring and trapping wolves,  laughing their heads off.  Killing animals is so much fun isn’t it? I mean what’s not to love about a wolf being strangled to death??

The videos were shot in Canada but there are pictures on the  Internet showing extreme cruelty to wolves caught in traps and snares in Idaho. They’re  hard to watch but necessary. This evil cannot be hidden anymore, it needs to be  spread far and wide for people to see.  Wildlife have no protection from this madness.  This is legalized animal torture.  What does this say about us as a culture? Can we sit silently by while these animals are brutally killed?

How many Idaho wolves are stuck in traps or snares right now, without food or water, scared to death, in excruciating  pain waiting to die? Or choking slowly to death in snares. Is this what we brought wolves back for? Spent millions of taxpayer dollars, only to slaughter them back into extermination?  Where is the outrage? Are we just going to sit by and watch this happen? Idaho has killed half of it’s wolves, 368 are dead in the state. 534 DEAD in the Northern Rockies and that’s not counting Wildlife Service killings, poaching, 10j and general wolf mortality. Pregnant alphas are being slaughtered. When is the media going to cover this story? Shame on your silence!

Traps and snares are indiscriminate killers. Wolf pups, dogs or any animal, wild or domestic,  is at risk.

It does not require a majority to prevail, but rather an irate, tireless minority keen to set brush fires in people’s minds…Samuel Adams

Speak Out For Them!

CONTACT

Governor Butch Otter

Mailing Address:
Idaho.gov
999 Main St, Suite 910
Boise, ID 83702

 Phone: 208-334-2100

Fax: (208) 334-3454

===

Idaho Fish and Game Commissioners

http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/cms/about/commission/members.cfm

Panhandle Region

Tony McDermott
mcmule@msn.com

===

Clearwater Region

Fred Trevey
fred.trevey@idfg.idaho.gov

===

Southwest Region

Bob Barowsky
bbarowsky@fmtc.com

===

Magic Valley Region

Wayne Wright
2wrights@cableone.net

===

Southeast Region

Randy Budge
rcb@racinelaw.net

===

Upper Snake Region

Kenny Anderson
kenny.anderson@idfg.idaho.gov
===

Salmon Region

Gary Power
gpower@centurytel.net

===

Idaho Fish and Game

IDFG Director Virgil Moore:

(208) 334-3771

virgil.moore@idfg.idaho.gov

===

Jon Rachael, IDFG Wildlife Dept.

(208) 334-2920  

jon.rachael@idfg.idaho.gov

Idaho Fish and Game General Numbers Click Here

===

Idaho tourism office

http://www.visitidaho.org/contact/

===

Write the Potato Commission

http://contact.idahopotato.com/

===

Video: YouTube

Photo: fish and game

Posted in: Animal Cruelty, Idaho wolves, Wolf Wars

Tags: wolf snaring, choking snares, wolf suffering, wolf hunts, where’s the outrage

© 2009-2012  Howling For Justice

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 6,027 other followers

%d bloggers like this: