Colville Tribes Holding Wolf Hunts On Their Reservation…

LookOut Pack Yearling 2008

Washington Lookout Pack Yearling Wolf 2008 (WDFW)

The Colvillle Tribes,  in eastern Washington, are holding a wolf hunt on their 1.4 million acre reservation, which is larger than Glacier National Park in Montana.  There are at least 2 wolf packs  living on the reservation, maybe three.  Many wildlife advocates were shocked by this turn of events.  The Colville tribe’s actions run contrary to Native Americans in the Great Lakes, specifically the Ojibwe, who are struggling to save their wolf brothers.

“The wolf, Ma’iingan, is considered sacred by the Ojibwe and figures highly in their creation stories. Tribal member Essie Leoso noted that according to tradition, Ma’iingan walked with first man.

“Killing a wolf is like killing a brother,” she said.”….Indian Country, Today Media dot com

I understand the Colville Tribe land is sovereign and they have the right to manage their affairs as they see fit but it’s very difficult to understand why the  tribes would hunt wolves  when so few wolves exist in Washington state in the first place and are still protected under state law in Eastern Washington.  It’s especially disturbing coming on the heals of the slaughter of the Wedge Pack, which is still fresh in every one’s minds. I hope the tribe re-thinks this decision. Wolves are a vital part of the ecosystem, they keep ungulate herds healthy and strong.

Scientists are sounding the alarm over the loss of our top predators:

“Just as the world’s lions, tigers, and bears are disappearing worldwide, a scientific consensus is emerging that they are critical to ecosystem function, exerting control over smaller predators, prey, and the plant world. 

Using such terms as “deep anxiety” and “grave concern” to signal their alarm, the authors contend that the loss of large animals, and apex predators in particular, constitutes humanity’s “most pervasive influence” on the environment. It amounts, they argue, to a “global decapitation” of the systems that support life on Earth.”…Environment 360, The Crucial  Role of  Predators

===

Colville Tribe opens wolf hunting season on reservation

Posted by Rich
Dec. 4, 2012 5:54 p.m.
Click HERE to read

===

Wisconsin Tribes Struggle to Save Their Brothers the Wolves From Sanctioned Hunt

MARY ANNETTE PEMBER
August 14, 2012
Click HERE to read
===

Wolf Hunting Not Allowed on Three Minnesota Reservations

October 29, 2012

The three reservations are depicted in Zone A on the map in the MnDNR Wolf Regulations. Tribal officials advise that going on Indian lands to take game, including wolves, is a federal crime under Title 18 of the United States Code and that they would seek the prosecution of violators.

The Tribal Councils say that hunting wolves for sport is inconsistent with a tradition of subsistence hunting and that for some members, hunting wolves presented conflicts with cultural practices.

Click HERE to read more:

===

Ojibwe bands ban wolf hunting – but only on Indian-controlled lands

by Dan Kraker, Minnesota Public Radio

October 31, 2012
Click HERE to read
===

Minnesota Ignores Indians, Allows Wolf Hunting

ICTMN STAFF
July 05, 2012
Click HERE to read
===
Environment 360

The Crucial Role of Predators:A New Perspective on Ecology

15 SEP 2011: ANALYSIS

Scientists have recently begun to understand the vital role played by top predators in ecosystems and the profound impacts that occur when those predators are wiped out. Now, researchers are citing new evidence that shows the importance of lions, wolves, sharks, and other creatures at the top of the food chain.

Click HERE to read

===
Photo: Courtesy ODFW
Posed in: Washington Wolves
Tags; Colville Tribe, Eastern Washington state. 1.4 million acre reservation,  few wolf packs in Washington state,  Wedge Pack killed for agribusiness,  wolves need to recover, importance of trophic cascades, apex predators,  LookOut pack poached by White family, Washington wolves have  setbacks, no good reason to hunt wolves

More Dead Wolves…

Does it ever end? I’d like to wake up someday and hear good news about wolves. That all the haters had a change of heart and realized wolves were a vital part of our ecosystem, just like our other apex predators. But alas that would take a miracle.

=======

Two Wolves Shot in Northwest Montana; Reward Offered

U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials are looking for information about two wolves found dead in the Flathead National Forest.

By New West Staff, 11-16-10

   
 
 
 

From the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service:

On Nov. 6, 2010, two wild gray wolves were found dead in separate locations on the Flathead National Forest in northwestern Montana. One wolf was found dead along Coal Creek Road, while the body of the other dead wolf was recovered in the Miller Creek area. Both animals appeared to have died as a result of gunshot wounds.

Killing a wolf is a violation of the Endangered Species Act.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the agency responsible for enforcing the Endangered Species Act, is investigating the wolves’ deaths. There is a reward of up to $2,500 is for information leading to the identification and prosecution of the person or persons involved in the killing of these wolves. If you have information regarding this case, please contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Great Falls, Montana at 406-761-2286.

http://www.newwest.net/topic/article/two_wolves_shot_in_northwest_montana_reward_offered/C41/L41/

=======

Wolf Warriors will be taking donations for a reward to catch these wolf killers. We will be posting the information on how to donate very soon.

For the wolves, For the wild ones,

Nabeki

This little Oregon Wenaha male wolf was shot dead soon after he was collared.

In Memory Of All The Wolves Killed For Nothing.

Photo: Courtesy Defenders of Wildlife

Posted in: Wolf Wars

Tags: wolf poaching, North Fork of the Flathead, USFWS, ESA, apex predators, reward

Published in: on November 17, 2010 at 11:19 pm  Comments (35)  
Tags: , , , , ,

Thinking Like a Mountain …….By Aldo Leopold

A deep chesty bawl echoes from rimrock to rimrock, rolls down the mountain, and fades into the far blackness of the night. It is an outburst of wild defiant sorrow, and of contempt for all the adversities of the world. Every living thing (and perhaps many a dead one as well) pays heed to that call. To the deer it is a reminder of the way of all flesh, to the pine a forecast of midnight scuffles and of blood upon the snow, to the coyote a promise of gleanings to come, to the cowman a threat of red ink at the bank, to the hunter a challenge of fang against bullet. Yet behind these obvious and immediate hopes and fears there lies a deeper meaning, known only to the mountain itself. Only the mountain has lived long enough to listen objectively to the howl of a wolf.

Those unable to decipher the hidden meaning know nevertheless that it is there, for it is felt in all wolf country, and distinguishes that country from all other land. It tingles in the spine of all who hear wolves by night, or who scan their tracks by day. Even without sight or sound of wolf, it is implicit in a hundred small events: the midnight whinny of a pack horse, the rattle of rolling rocks, the bound of a fleeing deer, the way shadows lie under the spruces. Only the ineducable tyro can fail to sense the presence or absence of wolves, or the fact that mountains have a secret opinion about them.

My own conviction on this score dates from the day I saw a wolf die. We were eating lunch on a high rimrock, at the foot of which a turbulent river elbowed its way. We saw what we thought was a doe fording the torrent, her breast awash in white water. When she climbed the bank toward us and shook out her tail, we realized our error: it was a wolf. A half-dozen others, evidently grown pups, sprang from the willows and all joined in a welcoming melee of wagging tails and playful maulings. What was literally a pile of wolves writhed and tumbled in the center of an open flat at the foot of our rimrock.

In those days we had never heard of passing up a chance to kill a wolf. In a second we were pumping lead into the pack, but with more excitement than accuracy: how to aim a steep downhill shot is always confusing. When our rifles were empty, the old wolf was down, and a pup was dragging a leg into impassable slide-rocks.

We reached the old wolf in time to watch a fierce green fire dying in her eyes. I realized then, and have known ever since, that there was something new to me in those eyes – something known only to her and to the mountain. I was young then, and full of trigger-itch; I thought that because fewer wolves meant more deer, that no wolves would mean hunters’ paradise. But after seeing the green fire die, I sensed that neither the wolf nor the mountain agreed with such a view.

Since then I have lived to see state after state extirpate its wolves. I have watched the face of many a newly wolfless mountain, and seen the south-facing slopes wrinkle with a maze of new deer trails. I have seen every edible bush and seedling browsed, first to anaemic desuetude, and then to death. I have seen every edible tree defoliated to the height of a saddlehorn. Such a mountain looks as if someone had given God a new pruning shears, and forbidden Him all other exercise. In the end the starved bones of the hoped-for deer herd, dead of its own too-much, bleach with the bones of the dead sage, or molder under the high-lined junipers.

I now suspect that just as a deer herd lives in mortal fear of its wolves, so does a mountain live in mortal fear of its deer. And perhaps with better cause, for while a buck pulled down by wolves can be replaced in two or three years, a range pulled down by too many deer may fail of replacement in as many decades. So also with cows. The cowman who cleans his range of wolves does not realize that he is taking over the wolf’s job of trimming the herd to fit the range. He has not learned to think like a mountain. Hence we have dustbowls, and rivers washing the future into the sea.

We all strive for safety, prosperity, comfort, long life, and dullness. The deer strives with his supple legs, the cowman with trap and poison, the statesman with pen, the most of us with machines, votes, and dollars,but it all comes to the same thing: peace in our time. A measure of success in this is all well enough, and perhaps is a requisite to objective thinking, but too much safety seems to yield only danger in the long run. Perhaps this is behind Thoreau’s dictum: In wildness is the salvation of the world. Perhaps this is the hidden meaning in the howl of the wolf, long known among mountains, but seldom perceived among men…….

Aldo Leopold

From: A Sand County Almanac 1949

“The seminal essay “Thinking Like a Mountain” recalls another hunting experience later in life that was formative for Leopold’s later views. Here Leopold describes the death of she-wolf killed by his party during a time when conservationists were operating under the assumption that elimination of top predators would make game plentiful. The essay provides a non-technical characterization of the trophic cascade where the removal of single species carries serious implications for the rest of the ecosystem.”

=======

Lessons from Aldo Leopold’s historic wolf hunt

The nation’s legendary conservationist saw the value of preserving wildness. Perhaps someday politicians will too.

December 13, 2009|By James William Gibson

http://articles.latimes.com/2009/dec/13/opinion/la-oe-gibson13-2009dec13

=======

Photos: Kewl Wallpaper

Posted in: Biodiversity, gray wolf/canis lupus

Tags: Thinking Like A Mountain, Aldo Leopold, trophic cascades, apex predators

%d bloggers like this: