Killing Echo: The “Mistaken Identity” Excuse, Part One

Echo Grand-Canyon NPS

Echo (Courtesy NPS)

February 27, 2015

It’s been a little over two months since Echo was shot dead by a coyote “hunter”. Her identity was confirmed by DNA analysis of her recovered scat, since she evaded all attempts of capture, making her one smart little wolf. I think Echo should have been called Miracle because it certainly was a miracle she managed to traverse the kill zone of the Northern Rockies and make it to the Grandest of all Canyons. She was the first wolf to set paw there in 70 years. Unfortunately she was not able to evade a bullet and so what could have been a new chapter in wolf recovery turned out to be a sad tale of loss. And the loss was huge. Echo defied the odds. She defied the USFWS who repeatedly said, no gray wolves in  Grand Canyon National Park. But Echo made it on her own, she didn’t ask permission, she left her natal pack in Wyoming and went searching for a mate. Her presence in The Canyon was history in the making, just as her male counterpart, OR7, made history by becoming the first wolf  to roam California in 90 years!

The Canyon is amazing wolf habitat, mule deer abound but there was only one problem, Echo was the only gray wolf in the park. What’s a wolf to do?  So she left the park and headed north, retracing her steps on her quest to find a mate, instead she found  a man with a gun.

Echo’s tragic story is not new, it’s been  repeated over and over again, ad nauseam. When wolves disperse out of the Northern Rockies or Great lakes they usually end up dead. How many more times will we hear about wandering wolves shot and killed by “coyote hunters”? There is no way in hell wolves will ever be able to reclaim former habitat if every time they attempt to do so, they’re killed. We could point to Oregon and Washington as success stories, Oregon now has 77 wolves.  Yes, wolves are thriving there, with OR7 as the poster wolf for that success but OR7’s story could have gone a completely different way. He made the right choice and dispersed to western Oregon and south to California, where there’s tolerance for wolves. Unfortunately a few of his siblings OR5 and OR9 took different paths and went east to the killing fields of Idaho, where they met grisly deaths.

Oregon and  Washington wolves have been successful because they’re not hunted YET. But Oregon is already in the planning stages of delisting wolves in the eastern part of the state, since Oregon’s wolf
“management” plan is so weak.

Washington, although they have a better long-term “management” plan of 15 successful breeding pairs over three years,  has not been particularly kind to wolves since they returned to the stateThe Lookout Pack, the first wolves confirmed in Washington state in 70 years were decimated by the White family.  I’m sure everyone remembers the disgusting account of Erin White trying to Fedex a bloody wolf pelt . 

“A FedEx agent declined to take the package after seeing what appeared to be blood leaking from it.

When a local police officer and the shipping-store owner discovered an animal pelt inside, they alerted state fish and wildlife agents. Genetic tests of the pelt later confirmed it was a gray wolf and an apparent member of the Washington state wolf pack.”…SeattleTimes

And we can’t forget the Wedge Pack and Huckleberry Pack debacles. Washington’s Teanaway Pack alpha female was poached in 2014, with a significant reward offered. Other wolves have been poached there as well, so all is not peachy for wolves in the Evergreen State,  even though they remain protected by state law in eastern Washington and retain federal and state protection in western Washington. Additionally the Colville and Spokane Tribes in eastern Washington hold wolf hunts on their reservations. The 2014/2015  Spokane tribe wolf hunt has a 6 wolf quota.

Aside from Washington and Oregon where are the dispersing wolves’ success stories? Can anyone name a single successful breeding pair of wolves outside of the Northern Rockies, Great Lakes or Mexican gray wolf territory, in Arizona and New Mexico?  In Missouri,  3 wolves have been killed in the last 13 years using the “coyote excuse”. In Kentucky, where wolves had been absent for 150 years, a wolf was shot dead because of “mistaken coyote identity”. The same thing in Kansas. And now Echo in Utah.

Obviously the “coyote excuse” is very convenient, even though coyotes and wolves look very different. It’s the equivalent of “the dog ate my homework” If you cop to killing a protected wolf, charges may be brought against you, probably just a slap on the wrist but there’s a possibility of fines or losing a hunting license. Using the “coyote excuse” is a get out of jail free card. This is why wolves are struggling to reclaim former habitat, because they walk around with targets on their backs, with little protection. The USFWS wants to put a final nail in their coffin with a national delisting. US Fish and Wildlife Services can’t protect wolves now when they’re listed as endangered, so how on earth can wolf recovery go forward if all federal protection is stripped from them? The message is clear and not subtle,  wolf recovery must be stopped dead in its tracks.

When Echo died it wasn’t just one wolf dying, which is tragic in itself but her demise closed the door on what could have been a new chapter for wolves in the Southwest. The Grand Canyon is perfect wolf habitat,  plenty of prey, mule deer abound, room to roam. Sadly the one thing missing were other wolves and that sealed Echo’s fate. She left the Canyon or was lured back into Utah, where she met her killer.

The Chairman of Arizona Game and Fish opined that Echo may have been deposited in the Grand Canyon by “radicalized environmental monkey wrenching”. In other words, stealth greenies snatched Echo from the Northern Rockies and plopped her in the North Rim of the Canyon, just to “monkey wrench” the USFWS plan to delist wolves nationally. Ummmmkay. Does this have anything to do with Area 51?

I can play the speculation, conspiracy game too. What if Echo was lured into Utah? What if the “coyote hunter” knew she was a wolf and shot her anyway? She was a threat after all, a wolf successfully dispersing into new territory? That can’t be allowed now can it?

Echo traveled hundreds of miles, defying the odds, to become the first wolf to set paw in the Grand Canyon since the 1940’s. This remarkable little wolf, just three years old, could have opened a new chapter for wolves reclaiming lost habitat.  She defied the USFWS, who said NO WOLVES IN THE GRAND CANYON! Excuse me if I’m suspicious of Echo’s death. NOTHING connected to wolves is ever straightforward.

RIP Sweet Echo, you were a pioneer for your species, an ambassador, seeking to reclaim the land of your ancestors! May your species continue to follow in your tracks!

“It is nothing short of a tragedy that this wolf’s journey across the west was cut short because she was shot and killed by a coyote hunter (…) This brave and ambitious female gray wolf that made it all the way from Wyoming to the Grand Canyon had already become a symbol of what gray wolf recovery should look like – animals naturally dispersing to find suitable habitat.”….Inquisitrdotcom

Echo Arizona Game and Fish

DNA Confirms Famed Wolf ‘Echo’ Killed By Coyote Hunter In Southern Utah

February 12, 2015

http://www.inquisitr.com/1837494/dna-confirms-famed-wolf-echo-killed-by-coyote-hunter-in-southern-utah/

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Coming next: Part Two

Killing Echo/Killing Wolves: The “Mistaken Identity” Excuse

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Top Photo: Courtesy Echo – NPS

Bottom Photo: Echo – Arizona Game and Fish

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Biodiversity, wolf recovery

Tags: Echo, epic journey, wolf recovery, biodiversity, North Rim Grand Canyon, wolf in the Canyon, senseless death, “coyote excuse”

50 Renowned Scientists Send Letter To Congress Urging “LEAVE WOLVES ALONE”

Wolf Puppy Wayne Pacelle Stock Photo

“Increasingly, Americans recognize the wide range of economic and ecological benefits that wolves bring.Photo: Stockphoto”

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Pack of Scientists Urges Congress to Leave Wolves, ESA Alone

February 18, 2015

A Humane Nation

Wayne Pacele’s Blog

Today, more than 50 world-renowned wildlife biologists and scientists, many of whom have devoted their entire professional careers toward understanding the social and biological issues surrounding wolves in North America, sent a letter to Congress urging members to oppose any efforts to strip federal protections for wolves in the contiguous 48 states. If Congress were to take this adverse action, according to these scientists, it would upend two recent federal court rulings, which criticized the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for distorting the “plain meaning” of the standards of the Endangered Species Act and admonished several state wildlife agencies for conducting overreaching and dangerous trophy hunting and trapping programs upon federal delisting.

The scientists, including Rolf Peterson and John Vucetich of Michigan Technological University, and Adrian Treves of University of Wisconsin, Madison, noted that “wolves are absent from most of the United States, with potentially secure populations in only a handful of states (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan). Yet, in those same states, the loss of federal protections resulted in state-sanctioned seasons on wolves at levels designed to reduce their populations to arbitrary goals, which were based on politics but not the best available science.”

Rather than removing wolves’ protections completely, there is a better way forward. A federal downlisting to “threatened” would be a far superior option, allowing “lethal management to resolve wolf-livestock conflicts.” Last month, The HSUS and 21 animal protection and conservation organizations petitioned the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reclassify gray wolves as “threatened” throughout their U.S. range south of Alaska (except the distinct Mexican gray wolf subspecies in the southwest which should remain listed as endangered). It’s the right compromise that balances the national interest in protecting wolves, while providing tools to federal and state agencies to allow selective control of wolves to address livestock and property damage.

This past fall, Michigan voted overwhelmingly against the notion of a trophy hunting season on wolves – in the first ever statewide votes on the issue of wolf hunting. Those votes – in a state with major hunting and agriculture industries – are additional indicators that increasing numbers of Americans recognize the wide range of economic and ecological benefits that wolves bring. More than 14 million people have viewed the documentary, How Wolves Change Rivers, showing how wolves move sedentary deer and elk populations so they don’t overgraze or browse. Wolves remove sick and weak animals, preventing slow starvation, and limiting deer-auto collisions and deer depredation on crops. By modulating prey herds, wolves act as a sort of barrier to chronic wasting disease and other infections that could cost the states millions of dollars to eradicate and in lost hunting license sales. And each year, thousands of wildlife watchers gaze at the world’s most-viewed wolves in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone, bringing in $35 million to the Yellowstone region annually. In the Great Lakes region, the International Wolf Center in Ely, Minnesota, brings in as much as $3 million each year from wolf watchers.

Lawmakers should respond to common sense, sound economics, and robust science. We’ve had enough of fairy tales and fabrications and trumped-up public safety charges against wolves. The reality is, they are hugely important in restoring the health of ecosystems and increasing the diversity of species. Wolves have their place, and with only about 5,000 of them in the lower 48 states, they should continue to receive federal protection.

http://blog.humanesociety.org/wayne/2015/02/scientists-letter-wolves-congress.html

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Photo: Courtesy HSUS

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Endangered Species Act, gray wolf

Tags: 50 renowned scientists, biodiversity, wolves benefit ecosystem, wolf recovery, wolf persecution, Congressional overreach, weakening the ESA, HSUS

Howl With Me…

Awoooooooo from the Canyon jpg

Steller: Lone wolf deserves chance to meet others

She must be lonely, spending Thanksgiving weekend wandering the Grand Canyon’s North Rim all on her own.

She’s a fertile, female wolf, and finding a mate is likely the force that drove her southward from her home in the northern Rocky Mountains.

http://tucson.com/news/local/column/steller-lone-wolf-deserves-chance-to-meet-others/article_97cefd04-0b78-5cc3-b347-55ea4b9c563d.html

“How Wolves Change Rivers”

This video is dedicated to the short-sighted flat earthers, who can’t seem to grasp the meaning of trophic cascades, or the benefit of having apex predators, like the wolf, on the landscape.  Maybe for one second you can stop talking about elk and realize nature is interconnected. Predators strengthen prey species and balance the ecosystem. That’s why they were put on this earth!

“And while I stood there I saw more than I can tell and I understood more than I saw; for I was seeing in a sacred manner the shapes of all things in the spirit, and the shape of all shapes as they must live together like one being”….Black Elk Speaks

Mt_Emily_male_wolf_brown_odfw

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Video: Courtesy YouTube Sustainable Man

Photo: Mt. Emily gray wolf – courtesy ODFW

Posted in:  gray wolf, biodiversity

Tags: gray wolf, biodiversity, Trophic Cascade, Yellowstone National Park, wolves return to Yellowstone, elk overgrazing, how wolves change rivers

More Stupidity From The Fringe…..

Effects of elk overgrazing in Yellowstone

“The top photo……from a paper by Ripple and his colleague Robert Beschta, was taken in 1991; the photo below is from 2002 and illustrates the recovery of streamside cottonwoods after just seven years of wolf presence.”…Todd Palmer and Rod Pringle

October 9, 2013

Wolves are being slaughtered left and right but that’s not enough for the wolf haters. They still  find it necessary to visit this blog and spew their anti wolf dogma. The main talking points are centered around the sub species of wolf reintroduced in 95/96.  The story goes that Occidentalis is the big, bad Canadian wolf who replaced the sweet, loving Irremotus. That of course is BS. Yes, Occidentalis was the sub species reintroduced to Yellowstone and Central Idaho..but the myth that they are super wolves is absolutely ridiculous. Wolves are wolves, apex predators who are vital to healthy Eco-systems.

Unlike human hunters, who kill the strongest and genetically sound animals, wolves select out the weak, sick, old and yes sometimes the young, which  helps control ungulate populations. Wolves don’t hide behind AR-15′s, they go toe to toe with their prey, that’s fair chase. Human hunters use heavy firepower, traps, snares and every sneaky trick in the book to torture, abuse, maim and kill animals.  Trophy hunters have nothing to be proud of. NOTHING! They wouldn’t be such big, brave “hunters” if they were limited to using their bare hands. Fair chase my a@%.

Canus lupis Irremotus are very similar to Canis Lupus Occidentalis, who are a bit heavier but still both sub species are wolves. They live in packs, hunt cooperatively and put family above all else.

“Canis Lupus Irremotus…..This subspecies generally weighs 70–135 pounds (32–61 kg) and stands at 26–32 inches, making it one of the largest subspecies of the gray wolf in existence. It is a lighter colored animal than its southern brethren, the Southern Rocky Mountains wolf, with a coat that includes far more white and less black. In general, the subspecies favors lighter colors, with black mixing in among them”…..Wiki

Occidentalis has always lived on both sides of the Northern Rockies US/Canadian border, since wolves know no boundaries. Anyone who believes otherwise is living in a fantasy world.  The idea that Occidentalis is foreign to American soil is absurd. They’ve been crossing back and forth across that “border” for tens of thousands of years.

The burning question I have for the professors of wolfology is if Irremotus was loved so much, why the hell did their wolf hating forefathers try to wipe them out?  Of course  attempting to reason with the unreasonable is an exercise in futility, so I don’t expect a cogent response to that question.

The other favorite talking point of wolf haters is the Yellowstone elk herd. Wolves are accused of decimating the elk in Yellowstone, when in fact it was the feds who were killing Yellowstone elk for decades, in the wolf’s absence, due to the damage elk were wreaking in the park.

“Once the wolves were gone the elk began to take over. Over the next few years conditions of Yellowstone National Park declined drastically. A team of scientists visiting Yellowstone in 1929 and 1933 reported, “The range was in deplorable conditions when we first saw it, and its deterioration has been progressing steadily since then.” By this time many biologists were worried about eroding land and plants dying off. The elk were multiplying inside the park and deciduous, woody species such as aspen and cottonwood suffered from overgrazing. The park service started trapping and moving the elk and, when that was not effective, killing them. This killing continued for more than 30 years. This method helped the land quality from worsening, but didn’t improve the conditions. At times, people would mention bringing wolves back to Yellowstone to help control the elk population. The Yellowstone managers were not eager to bring back wolves, especially after having so successfully ridding the park of them, so they continued killing elk. In the late 1960s, local hunters began to complain to their congressmen that there were too few elk, and the congressmen threatened to stop funding Yellowstone. Killing elk was given up as a response, and then the population of the elk increased exponentially. With the rapid increase in the number of elk, the condition of the land again went quickly downhill. The destruction of the landscape affected many other animals. With the wolves gone, the population of coyotes increased dramatically, which led to an extreme decrease in the number of pronghorn antelope.However, the increase in the elk population caused the most profound change in the ecosystem of Yellowstone after the wolves were gone.”.…..Wiki

Elk numbers had swelled to over twenty thousand while wolves were away…a very bad thing for Yellowstone. As Aldo Leopold so eloquently states in Thinking Like A Mountain:

“I have lived to see state after state extirpate its wolves. I have watched the face of many a newly wolfless mountain, and seen the south-facing slopes wrinkle with a maze of new deer trails. I have seen every edible bush and seedling browsed, first to anaemic desuetude, and then to death. I have seen every edible tree defoliated to the height of a saddlehorn. Such a mountain looks as if someone had given God a new pruning shears, and forbidden Him all other exercise. In the end the starved bones of the hoped-for deer herd, dead of its own too-much, bleach with the bones of the dead sage, or molder under the high-lined junipers.

“I now suspect that just as a deer herd lives in mortal fear of its wolves, so does a mountain live in mortal fear of its deer. And perhaps with better cause, for while a buck pulled down by wolves can be replaced in two or three years, a range pulled down by too many deer may fail of replacement in as many decades. So also with cows. The cowman who cleans his range of wolves does not realize that he is taking over the wolf’s job of trimming the herd to fit the range. He has not learned to think like a mountain. Hence we have dust-bowls, and rivers washing the future into the sea.”

Do your homework wolf haters and stop parroting talking points drilled into your heads by the hunting and ranching cabal.

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ff

Submitted on 2013/07/14 at 1:17 pm | In reply to Helga Guillen.
Kill them alL!
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Andrew Light

Submitted on 2013/08/02 at 3:37 am
You antis need to go back to high school and learn about “carrying capacity.” fuck these wolves. bet half of you didn’t know these aren’t even the same breed of wolves we once had. i hope all your pets get eaten by wolves. Trap and hunt for life, come stop me please.
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LUNATIC OUTPOST FTW

Submitted on 2013/08/17 at 5:46 pm
who cares kill the wolves, IDGAF. stupid libtards.
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steve

Submitted on 2013/08/28 at 7:08 pm
You guys dont have much of a clue about wolves! You need to be educated on wolves! You should look at the web site “saveelk.com”. Read the Lynn Stutter on the truth about wolves!
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80hd

Submitted on 2013/09/03 at 11:21 am
Dispelling a myth, eh? The original wolves in Yellowstone were C. l. irremotus…. the wolves introduced were C. l. occidentalis. Guess where they came from?
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O.
submitted on 2013/09/17 at 10:28 am | In reply to Jan.| In reply to Jan.
Dear Jan,
I have lived in the West all my life. I am dedicated to conservation and habitat improvement for all native wildlife. The Canadian Grey Wolf is not native to Idaho, Montana or Wyoming. The Rocky Mountain Wolves that were documented living here in the 1980′s and early 1990′s were scavengers and did not efficiently hunt in packs. The native wolves were solitary, except during mating season, had large territories and made very little impact on prey species within their range.

The efforts to control the exploding population if this invasive species of wolves are warranted by the respective States because they need to protect native wildlife, livestock, tourism, habitat, and a number of other issues which are more important than accommodating a Federal Government’s program to establish a feral nightmare.
It is not about killing wolves. It is about protecting our ecosystems.
Respectfully,
O.

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Mark

Submitted on 2013/09/23 at 2:40 pm
That’s all fine and good but humans shouldn’t die so that these predators can thrive. Pure bleeding heart BS..

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matt

Submitted on 2013/09/30 at 1:57 pm
This is the biggest hunk of shit that I have ever read. You tree hugging fucks need to get a real job! “Protecting the Wolves” from the big bad ranchers and hunters. Please!

The “reimbursements” for cattle killed in New Mexico, are still yet to be seen. Countless cattle killed on ranches and not a penny in site. Furthermore, when the average cost to introduce one of these wolves is upwards of $1 million dollars, and our tax dollars go to this bullshit rather than the present deficit that our failed president has bestowed upon our country…
Sickening

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John

Submitted on 2013/10/06 at 3:40 pm

Thought you might like to read a response from one of the sickest part of the population. How much time do any of you spend on wildlife conservation? How many hrs per year do any of you spend on habitat renewal? I am willing to bet not as much time as your average hunter. I enjoy every second I spend in the wilderness I personally see hundreds of animals in a year. I also see the impact on the animals from over population. I see the side of nature most of you want to pretend doesn’t exist. The starving animals and the displaced wolves, coyotes, fox and others. You say its wrong to kill a coyote. Say that when you find one in your backyard about to rip your child apart. Ask a rancher how they feel about wolves. You won’t hear many say they like them.

Now onto “trophy hunting”. Trophy hunting and caged hunts are as different as night and day. Any respectable hunter would never take part in a caged hunt. Most people that do are rich wall street types that have no morals in the first place. A true Trophy hunter is not a butcher. They are men and women just like you. However they posses what some call the alpha gene. Most of these ” butchers” and “serial killers” see more animals than all of you combined. Maybe the kill one or two. They kill them because they are the oldest and largest of the type. A damn hard thing to do. Instead of blaming hunters maybe you should focus you misguided anger towards the developers. The ones who keep pushing the city further into the habitat of these animals. Believe it or not I love animals just as much if not more than most of you. I however am not afraid to get my hands bloody fixing the mess created by the non hunter. You might hand out meals at a soup kitchen. But hunters are the ones who put the meat on the plate.

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NOBODY

Submitted on 2013/10/04 at 4:41 pm | In reply to Daniel Martinez.

I live and hunt in Wyoming. Now hear me out, I do not hate wolves and do not want them to go extinct, but wolves have killed over 50% of our elk herds near Yellowstone and have completely decimated our moose, bighorn sheep, mountain goat, and deer herds. I agree that shooting a wolf right when it exits the park is kind of unethical, and that Wyoming needs wolves in its ecosystem. The thing is, these wolf populations have to be kept in check, and hunting is a good way to do that.

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These hateful views are represented by the hunting and ranching monopoly,  who in turn control policy makers in Washington, on both sides of the aisle. Their disinformation campaign has spread like a virus across this country and is contributing to the mass slaughter of wolves now taking place!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

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Why We Need Wolves In Our Parks

Todd Palmer and Rob Pringle

Posted March 20, 2009 | 12:32 AM (EST)

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/todd-palmer-and-rob-pringle/why-we-need-wolves-in-our_b_177209.html

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Top Photo: Courtesy Huffington Post

Bottom Photo: Courtesy of Brett Havestick

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Trophy hunting, Biodiversity

Tags: Canis Lupus Occidentalis, Canis Lupus Irremotus, anti wolfers ill-informed, biodiversity, trophic cascades, Aldo Leopold, Thinking Like A Mountain, trophy hunting animal abuse, hateful rhetoric, non science based thinking, lies and damn lies.

Remember The Wolves On Earth Day….

Remember the wolves earth-day-2013.jpg.pagespeed.ic.3sfir4FsoF

BE THEIR VOICE

‘Let the Wolves run free’ by Ratty and the Watchers

Wolf Pack Howling On Lake

Your amber eyes and coat of ashes,
I see sorrow in your face,
With the pain the young one thrashes,
a trophy for the human race,
Hunted down I feel the heartache,
from ancient dens the wolves must flee,
Misunderstood beliefs we must break,
education is the key.

I saw a pack when in full flight,
Brothers / sisters chasing starlight,
Their hearts are yearning to be free of our world.

In the night an Alpha male howls,
it’s a song of such beauty,
All they hear is Hollywood growls,
and not the call to his family,
Never safe on the lonely mountain,
the guns are heard in the deep valley,
Another notch on the butt of a rifle,
a cub added to the death tally.

Shadows dancing on moonlit skies,
Leave them be don’t wave them goodbye,
All they want is to be free of our world.

Look in his face, Look in his eyes, there’s only grace, there’s no disguise
Look at their life, what do you see, don’t give them strife, let them run free,
Let the Wolves run free!!

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Video: YouTube Ratty and the Watchers

Photo: Wolves Howling on Lake, Courtesy Jim Brandenburg

Posted in: gray wolves, biodiversity

Tags: biodiversity, gray wolf, Let the Wolves Run Free,  Ratty and the Watchers

‘Let the Wolves run free’ by Ratty and the Watchers

Wolf Pack Howling On Lake

Your amber eyes and coat of ashes,
I see sorrow in your face,
With the pain the young one thrashes,
a trophy for the human race,
Hunted down I feel the heartache,
from ancient dens the wolves must flee,
Misunderstood beliefs we must break,
education is the key.

I saw a pack when in full flight,
Brothers / sisters chasing starlight,
Their hearts are yearning to be free of our world.

In the night an Alpha male howls,
it’s a song of such beauty,
All they hear is Hollywood growls,
and not the call to his family,
Never safe on the lonely mountain,
the guns are heard in the deep valley,
Another notch on the butt of a rifle,
a cub added to the death tally.

Shadows dancing on moonlit skies,
Leave them be don’t wave them goodbye,
All they want is to be free of our world.

Look in his face, Look in his eyes, there’s only grace, there’s no disguise
Look at their life, what do you see, don’t give them strife, let them run free,
Let the Wolves run free!!

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Video: YouTube Ratty and the Watchers

Photo: Wolves Howling on Lake, Courtesy Jim Brandenburg

Posted in: gray wolves, biodiversity

Tags: biodiversity, gray wolf, Let the Wolves Run Free,  Ratty and the Watchers

Raul Grijalva For Interior Secretary

Tell President Obama: Appoint Raúl Grijalva US Interior Secretary

Tell President Obama: Appoint Raul Grijalva US Interior Secretary

A Champion For Our Public Lands. Protecting Our National Treasures. A Bold Leader.

For Secretary of Interior, the choice is clear. President Obama should appoint Rep. Raul Grijalva. He’s a bold leader and a champion of our public lands who will protect our natural treasures, including American wild horses and burros, for generations to come.

Dear President Obama,

Your choice for the next Secretary of the Interior will determine the future of our public lands and their natural resources, including wild horses and burros.The individual you appoint must reflect the ideals that you campaigned upon and that so many of us supported.

The person best qualified to represent these ideals and move the Interior Department forward is Rep. Raul Grijalva, Congressman from Arizona’s Third Congressional District.

Rep. Grijalva has spent his entire career standing up to special interests and for American taxpayers and the preservation of our natural resources. As the top Democrat on the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands since 2007, he has been an outspoken advocate for conservation. He has also been a leader in the fight to reform the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) costly and inhumane wild horse and burro program.

As Interior Secretary, Rep. Grijalva will hold the BLM accountable, and he will stop the government giveaway of public resources to commercial interests that exploit our public lands.

Please nominate Rep. Raul Grijalva as the 51st Secretary of the Interior. He is clearly the best choice to protect and preserve our public lands and our natural heritage, including America’s treasured wild horses and burros.

Sincerely,

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PLEASE ClICK HERE TO SIGN PETITION

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Petition credit given to: www.wildhorsepreservation.org

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Howling For Justice

Tags: Wild Horse Preservation dot org, Appoint Raul Grijalva, Secretary of the Interior, biodiversity, gray wolves, wild horses, President Obama

“How lonely is the night without the howl of a wolf.” ~ Unknown

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