Wolves Howling Methow Valley, Washington

Listen to the Lookout Pack in Washington’s Methow Valley.  It’s music to my ears. 

“We listened for a voice crying in the wilderness. And we heard the jubilation of wolves!” -Durwood L. Allen

“When Conservation Northwest Executive Director, Mitch Friedman, his children, and nephew joined state and federal biologists to check in on the Lookout Pack, Washington’s first pack in over 70 years, they were treated to quite a chorus!”

=============

Here’s The First Litter of Lookout Pack Pups Caught On Remote Camera  August 12, 2008 (unfortunately only one survived)

===============

But all was not lost.  What you are hearing in the first video is their second litter born in 2009!! AND the discovery of a second wolf pack in Pend Oreille County.

Lookout Pack has new litter; wolves confirmed in Pend Oreille County

By Joyce Campbell, Methow Valley News
July 15, 2009
 
==============

Lookout Pack observed moving about its territory

By Joyce Campbell, Methow Valley News

January 1, 2010

http://methowvalleynews.com/story.php?id=540

Posted in: Washington wolves, wolf recovery, biodiversity

Tags: wolf howls, Lookout Pack, gray wolf/canis lupus, wolf recovery

Advertisements

Hunters kill 20 wolves in first Swedish hunt in 45 years

More bad news, this time from Sweden.  For the first time in forty-five years, Swedish wolves are being hunted. Hunters killed 20 wolves out of the 27 wolf quota, on the first day of the hunt.  How incredibly sad. To my fellow wolf supporters in Sweden, my heart goes out to you.

Sweden’s wolves number a little over 200 animals. Yet this tiny wolf population is being hunted.  20 wolves are gone.  For what? 

Wolf persecution is global!!

We have just begun to fight…….John Paul Jones

=================

“Hunter Sune Johansson weights a female wolf after it was shot”

Hunters kill 20 wolves in first Swedish hunt in 45 years

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.227e6a4e11ba39c08630e5729d693330.a81&show_article=1

Posted in: Swedish wolves

Tags: Swedish wolf hunt, gray wolf/canis lupus, trophy hunting wolves

Published in: on January 2, 2010 at 11:51 pm  Comments (6)  
Tags: , ,

Montana FWP Thinks 2009 Wolf Hunt ‘Good Day For Montana’

 

I was shocked by the headline in the Missoulian, “FWP says 2009 wolf hunt ‘a good day for Montana’, quoting Carolyn Sime, Montana state wolf coordinator.  FWP even released a report on the hunt.  Apparently, the devil is in the details. 

Of course they’re going to be thrilled with themselves, they planned the hunt mere months after gray wolves were delisted. What are they going to say? We did a miserable job and 203 wolves are now dead in Montana between the hunt and wolves killed by Wildlife Services? 

The wolf population in the state, before all the killing started, was approx. 450-500 wolves. Is anyone considering the Montanans that are wholly against the wolf hunts? That we consider this slaughter plain and simple in the name of hunting and ranching. That over FORTY PERCENT of Montana’s wolves are dead and Wildlife Services isn’t done yet?  There are kill orders out on 22 more wolves from five packs, if they haven’t been killed already. No, the Montana hunt and shadow Wildlife Service hunt was not a wonderful success. FIVE HUNDRED NORTHERN ROCKIES WOLVES ARE DEAD.

This statement from the article caught my eye. “Others worried about the potential to wipe out entire packs.” How many packs of wolves has Wildlife Services taken out this year? I can name the Sage Creek Pack, the Big Hole Pack the Centennial pack AND they are gunning for the Mitchell Mountain, Battlefield and Pintler packs. Visit my wolf pack memorial page to see how busy they’ve been. Wildlife Services gunned down twenty seven members of the Hog Heaven Pack last year. TWENTY SEVEN WOLVES. Nine entire packs were wiped out in Montana in 2008 by WS on the orders of FWP. Are people living in dream land concerning what is happening to wolves in Montana and the Northern Rockies in general?? We didn’t need a Montana wolf hunt. WS killed more wolves this year then the hunts. The combination of the two was a double whammy to wolves. This is why State Fish and Game Agencies shouldn’t be managing wolves.

It’s a grim time for Montanans who care about wolves and it’s certainly a disaster for wolves. What in the world is there to celebrate or be happy about concerning wolves?

Posted in: Wildlife Services War on Wildlife, Montana wolf hunt, Wolf Wars, aerial gunning of wolves

Tags: Wildlife Services, Montana wolf hunt, gray wolf/canis lupus, wolves or livestock

A Quiet Meditation For Wolf Revealed

honoring the hunted 7

My friend, Cindy Campbell,  shared her meditation with wolf and has given me permission to share it with my readers.  During the past weeks of chaos we all need to remember to slow down and reflect on life.  Her experience may bring us a little peace and enlightenment.  HOWLS!!

===================================

For My Fellow Wolf Admirers,

  The Wolf Meditation which took place during the twilight hour on November 15 was an enlightening and rewarding experience.  The sky was crystal clear, the stars shown brightly and the air was crisp, measuring only 5 degrees. I had a small campfire which kept me perfectly warm (along with down blankets and a few layers of clothing!).  For the first 10 minutes I took in my surroundings. The sky, the fire, the crystal reflections of the frost on the trees and bushes.  I immediately knew I was transforming into a different space and it felt very comfortable and inviting.  I have always believed the time between dark and light was magical, we just don’t make an effort to go there very often.  The silence was consuming as well.  I did wonder about night visitors and what they might be thinking ie: Great Grey, Raccoon and Coyote.  Then I remembered, they already knew exactly what I were doing and why!
The meditation itself started at 5:30 am and lasted until 6:15 am when I opened my eyes. (After I went back inside around 6:30 I immediately wrote out the message I received during the meditation). At this point the dawn was just starting to peek over the mountains in front of me.  The silhouette, of the tall wise pine trees at the top of the hill, was taking shape.  I stoked the fire, although I must say I stayed very warm and toasty throughout.  What I did next was very powerful.  I slowly dripped the Snake River water onto the fire and imaged lifting and cleansing the spirit of one wolf, then another, then another.  I brought the wolves that we all know and have come to love, I brought wolves killed which we knew nothing about, and I brought wolves who will need cleansing over the next 3 or 4 months.  All the wolves felt healthy, strong, beautiful and forever.  I then asked for forgiveness from the original Wolf Clan for the ruthless way we ended their lives. I promised our support to keep fighting to make sure things become fair and balanced between us and our Brother Wolf. I admitted many of us understand this is not currently the case. As the droplets of the cold clean water hit the fire, it sizzled loudly and put out a small puff of smoke.  It was in that moment I felt a loving presence all around me. I knew I wasn’t alone.
By now the day sky was taking over the night sky and it was time to go back into the warmth of my home and write out the important message I received.  Following is that message.An Alpha female wolf will be born, she will endure a very rough start into this world.  She’ll grow into a beautiful wolf with very distinct markings.  She will be a gray wolf with predominately white feet and tail.   She will have a darker face with a visible black marking on her forehead.  Her Alpha male will be black and he’ll be the larger of the two.  They will live where wolves are hunted on a regular basis.  One of their litters, the second they have, will consist of thirteen pups! Four will die, nine will live through the first months, seven will live to adulthood, and two will have life changing experiences which will turn upside down the entire concept of how humans and wolves walk side by side from here on out.  It will be a revolutionary change. This litter will be the tell all of our progress in helping wolf survive in these small pockets of wilderness.  This family will become known in 4-1/2 – 5 years (2013-14).  The Alpha female will carry the genes of the Cottonwood Alpha female killed during this years hunt. She will teach the 2 special pups from her second litter something new, different and powerful.  It will take the original Wolf Clan that many generations to get the information correct so that it can be safely and effectively passed down.  I got the impression these game changing wolves will be a sister and brother team.

At this point I waited intently for more information but quickly realized the message was complete, for now.  I clearly knew I was alone again.

As I have learned through my work as a animal communicator, it could be tempting for me to start interpreting the message, but I will not. I merely hold the position of messenger. The wolves will fill in the rest as they see fit.  Our job now is to stay attentive and to always be listening.

Thank you to everyone who took a few minutes, sometime during that day to tap into the well-being of our fellow living being – Brother Wolf.

With Love, Illuminating Light and Wolf Howls All Around,
Cindy

Photo: Wikimedia Commons
Posted in: Canis lupus, Let Wolves Live In Peace
Tags:  gray wolf, gray wolf/Canis lupus
Published in: on November 29, 2009 at 3:34 am  Comments (5)  
Tags:

Imnaha Wolf Pack….Eastern Oregon!!

Here is positive wolf news in an otherwise grim season. I wanted to post this video last week but was sidetracked by Idaho extending the wolf hunt and the predator derby.

ODFW caught the ten member Imnaha Wolf pack walking single file through the eastern Oregon woods with at least six pups!! Leading the pack is alpha female B-300.

(“This video taken by ODFW on Nov. 12, 2009in the Imnaha Wildlife Management Unit (east of Joseph, Ore. in Wallowa County) shows at least 10 wolves make up a pack that ODFW has been monitoring since June 2008. The video was taken from an adjacent ridge across a canyon and shows a mixture of gray and black individual wolves moving upslope.”)

Eastern Oregon wolves again star in video, this time with youngsters

By Abby Haight, The Oregonian

November 19, 2009, 6:00PM

http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2009/11/eastern_oregon_wolves_again_st.html

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Posted in: Oregon wolves, wolf recovery, biodiversity

Tags: wolf recovery, gray wolf,

Published in: on November 23, 2009 at 3:38 am  Comments (4)  
Tags: ,

“Lords of Nature” Playing in Columbia Falls, Mt. This Thursday

Photo: SigmaEye Flicker

Hi Everyone,

The must see video “Lords of Nature”, is coming to Columbia Falls, Mt. this Thursday @ 7pm.  This is the premiere film on predators, if you love wolves, grizzlies and moutain lions, this is for you!!

Flathead Valley, this is your chance to view this incredible film. The event is being sponsored by Defenders of Wildlife.  Here are the details.

What:

Lords of Nature Film Premiere followed by a Q & A Session

When:

Thursday, November 19th from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Where:

Glacier Discovery Square
540 Nucleus Avenue
Columbia Falls, MT 59912

HOWLS!! 

https://howlingforjustice.wordpress.com/2009/09/23/lords-of-nature-life-in-a-land-of-great-predators/

Category posted in: gray wolf, wolf recovery, grizzly bear, North Fork

Tags: gray wolf, endandered species act, Glacier National Park, biodiversity

Controversy Surrounds Wolves Poached In North Fork

Three wolves were poached in the North Fork of the Flathead recently but the quota of allowable hunted wolves was not changed in response to those illegal acts.  Montana FWP defended their non-action on the premise that wolves die from lots of things so they just worked the poached wolf numbers into general wolf mortality.  Sorry I’m not buying it.  Three wolves were illegally shot and the guy that shot two of them, Randy Houk from Columbia Falls, Mt,  got off with a fine.  He didn’t lose his hunting license, because supposedly he cooperated with authorities.  So what, give him a gold star and still take away his hunting license.  Altogether five wolves were lost in the North Fork.  Two to hunting and three to poaching.  Why not stronger poaching consequences?

There are two North Fork wolf packs that den in the relative safety of Glacier National Park, the Dutch Pack and Kintla Pack.  Before wolf hunting started these packs were safe to roam, as wolves have been doing in the North Fork for the last thirty years.  Unfortunately, like Yellowstone’s Cottonwood Pack, they don’t read signs and regularly cross back and forth across park boundaries.

Why are wolves being “managed” as replaceable units with the “wolf is a wolf is wolf” approach? The loss of alphas can destroy a pack, as we saw in the recent slaying of Yellowstone’s Cottonwood alphas.  Defenders of Wildlife spoke out on this issue stating poached wolves should be counted in the quota. 

In the meantime wolf hunting marches on with 98 dead wolves in Idaho and 64 + 3 poached wolves in Montana.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Categories posted in: Glacier National Park, Montana wolf hunt, North Fork,

Tags: wolf poaching, Montana wolf hunt, gray wolf

The International Wolf Center

The The International Wolf Center, located in Ely, Minnesota, cares for a pack of  ambassador gray wolves with three different sub-species,  The Arctic wolf…canis lupus arctos, The Great Plains wolf..canis lupus nubulis and The Rocky Mountain wolf…canis lupis occidentalis.  Two pups were introduced into the pack named Aidan and Denali, who were born at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minnesota, in April 2008.

The pack consists of Grizzer, Maya, Denali, Aidan, Shadow and Malik.  They have their own YouTube channel, with amazing videos.  Even though these are captive wolves the center does a great job educating and advocating for wolves. 

The International Wolf Center YouTube Channel.  Enjoy!!

http://www.youtube.com/user/IntlWolfCenter

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Category Posted in: gray wolves

Tags: wolf research, gray wolf

Published in: on November 11, 2009 at 2:36 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: ,

Rock Star Wolves….The Druid Peak Pack

Yellowstone_Wolves

Update: March 6, 2010 The Druid Peak Pack is down to just one wolf.  This is a tragic end to a legendary wolf pack.  Click here for the sad story

========= 

Wolves are the rock stars in Yellowstone National Park.  No animal is more popular, with the exception of the Great Bear. Wolves are charismatic, social, smart, great parents and completely captivating.  One pack stands out against the backdrop of Yellowstone’s little Serengeti” Lamar Valley….The Druids. 

For years they ruled the Lamar Valley, battling other wolf packs for dominance BUT they’ve suffered a setback in recent times.  The pack that once numbered 37 have diminished to just 10 wolves, who are plagued by mange.  BUT the Druids are making a comeback and if they can beat the mange as the Mollies Pack  have, they may once again take their place as the rulers of the Lamar.

Still the  Druid Peak Pack are the most celebrated wolf pack in the world, having been featured in several National Geographic documentaries, specifically: Wolves: A Legend Returns to Yellowstone and In The Valley of the Wolves.   Since wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone in 1995 and the subsequent formation of the Druids, they have been and will continue to be studied and researched by teams of  biologists and wolf researchers such as Doug Smith and Daniel MacNulty. They attract tourists from around the globe,who breathlessly observe them through high powered viewing scopes. The Druid’s lives are played out, against the backdrop of Lamar, like a lupine version of  a famous soap opera. (click this link for the full Nature version of: In the Valley of the Wolves)

Here is the beginning of their story, told through the lens of Bob Landis, famous filmmaker, director and photographer.  Sadly, the Druids famed alpha’s #21 and #42 are no longer with us but the Druids live on in their beloved Lamar. 

IN THE VALLEY OF THE WOLVES

The Director, Bob Landis, discusses the Druids and the making of this spectacular glimpse into their lives.

Yellowstone wolves are worth their weight in gold, bringing in $30-$35 million per year, in tourism dollars, to Greater Yellowstone.  They are more profitable then hunting in that area.

Instead of killing wolves we should be re-thinking ways to increase eco-tourism, which could generate big revenue across Montana, Idaho and the west.  Ninety percent of the public does not hunt.  The majority of Americans want their wildlife living and breathing.   We must stop living in the past, using  arcane and cruel methods to control our predators for agriculture and move forward into the twenty first century, respecting wolves as top dog predators who are necessary for a balanced and healthy ecosystem.  It’s the wolf who honed the elegant elk into the beautiful creatures they are, not man.  Nipping at their heals, down through the ages, canis lupus bequeathed to the elk, their fleetness of foot.  

For many Americans wolves remain a symbol of freedom, an icon of the West.  The wild canine’s continuing recovery and presence will help preserve the wild places for our children and their children.  But if we continue down the destructive path we’re on will our legacy to them be a West Without Wolves?

alphas 42 and 21 druids

legendary Druid alpha’s #42 and #21

=======================

Howling Druids

Yellowstone Druid Wolves I

Photo: Wikemedia Commons

Categories posted in: Yellowstone wolves, biodiversity

Tags: Yellowstone wolves, gray wolf

=====================================

Wolf tourism in Yellowstone region

eyes of the wolf

http://www.montanasnewsstation.com/Global/story.asp?S=7880672&nav=menu227_5

Published in: on November 6, 2009 at 7:53 pm  Comments (1)  
Tags: ,

Senior Wolves Give Elk A Break

social security

Update: June 30, 2012

I posted this in 2009, just as the first wolf hunts were underway in Montana and Idaho. I believed that if we provided  fish and game managers with scientific fact about the detrimental effects of wolf hunting it might have some effect. How naive I was!

===

November 5, 2009

It turns out wolves age just like people and according to wolf researcher, Daniel MacNulty, by age four, wolves are considered old. This insight into the life span of wolves could have far-reaching implications concerning “managing” them.   The older the wolf, the less threat they are to elk, due to their reduced physical stamina.

The teenagers and young adults of the pack do most of the leg work chasing down prey, while the older wolves are important at the end of the chase, with their larger bodies and heftier builds, they help youngsters with the take down.  It all makes perfect sense.  Dr. MacNulty states hunting wolves to reduce their numbers may backfire.

“It’s been shown in other hunted populations of wolves that hunting skews the population toward younger age classes,” he explains. And, as his research shows, that could spell more deaths, not fewer, for the elk.

The reason hunting pushes a population’s age structure downward is because being hunted is like playing Russian roulette. If, starting early in life, every member of a society had to play Russian roulette regularly, not too many would live to a ripe old age, he says.”

But wolf supporters don’t really believe wolf hunts are about “the science.”  Still I’m hopeful Dr.MacNulty’s research will open a few eyes.

===

Washed-up wolves

Surprising discoveries about aging wolves and their effects on elk

washed up wolves
The elk-hunting skills of wolves decline significantly with age, a University of Minnesota study shows.

Photo: Douglas Dance

By Deane Morrison

Contrary to their fearsome, folk tale-rooted image, wolves just aren’t all that good as predators. To bring down big prey, they have nothing but speed and teeth–no claws that can rip flesh, no massive paws to kayo their quarry.

Now, a University of Minnesota-led study of wolves in Yellowstone National Park shows how even that modest ability soon ebbs away. Daniel MacNulty and his colleagues found that the wolves were in their hunting prime at the ages of 2 and 3, but then their skills deteriorated steadily. They lived, on average, till age 6.

Writing in the September 23, 2009 issue of Ecology Letters, MacNulty, a postdoctoral researcher in the University’s Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, and his colleagues reported that the higher the proportion of wolves older than 3 in the park, the lower the rate at which they kill elk, their main source of food. The findings run counter to a belief, held by many ecologists, that wild predators maintain their physical skills as long as they live.

But the study “shows that aging impairs the ability of the wolves to catch elk,” says MacNulty, “The data connect aging with an important ecological process, namely predation.”

MacNulty has followed the Yellowstone wolves since their reintroduction to the park in 1995. He says the lowered hunting ability of older wolves may afford some protection to the elk, which would fare worse if all the wolves were spring chickens.

“For example, when 22 percent of the wolves in Yellowstone were 3 or older, the kill rate was 0.4 elk per pack per day,” says MacNulty. “If the older wolves were 52 percent of the population, the kill rate dropped to 0.22 elk per pack per day.”

In general, for every 10 percent rise in the proportion of wolves older than 3, the Yellowstone wolf population saw a decline in the kill rate of 10 to 15 percent, he says.

“… [W]hen 22 percent of the wolves in Yellowstone were 3 or older, the kill rate was 0.4 elk per pack per day. If the older wolves were 52 percent of the population, the kill rate dropped to 0.22 elk per pack per day.”

MacNulty has also documented the decline of individual aging wolves’ hunting skills. For example:

“Wolf number 21 in the Druid Peak pack lived to about 9,” he says. “Video of 21 over his lifetime showed him slowing down when chasing elk as he neared the end of life.”
As the geezer wolves lose their edge, the study suggests that young adults in the pack shoulder more of the workload and share their kills. This may provide aging members of the pack with a lupine version of social security.

Why wolf hunting may backfire

The number of elk in Yellowstone has declined in recent years, and many believe wolves are the main cause, MacNulty says. But he notes that drought, which has reduced the supply of plants elk eat, and predation of elk calves by grizzly bears have also probably contributed.

Montana legalized wolf hunting after the animal was taken off the endangered species list in 2008. But hunting of wolves won’t necessarily help the elk, and not just because only a few wolves have been taken so far, MacNulty says.

“It’s been shown in other hunted populations of wolves that hunting skews the population toward younger age classes,” he explains. And, as his research shows, that could spell more deaths, not fewer, for the elk.

The reason hunting pushes a population’s age structure downward is because being hunted is like playing Russian roulette. If, starting early in life, every member of a society had to play Russian roulette regularly, not too many would live to a ripe old age, he says.

Currently, MacNulty is working with a colleague at Michigan Technological University to “nail down,” or quantify, the effect on elk of wolf management that involves hunting. 

“We’re modeling wolf-elk dynamics and looking at how changes in wolf age structure affect elk numbers,” he says.

http://www1.umn.edu/news/features/2009/UR_CONTENT_143264.html

===

Photo: Courtesy Douglas Dance

Categories posted in: gray wolf,  wolf recovery, wolves under fire

Tags: gray wolf, wolf recovery, wolf research

%d bloggers like this: