Anti-Wolf Comments Demonstrate Ignorance and Hysteria Wolves Face….

Wolf paranoia Rational Wiki
A typical wolf about to take your children and eat your job!

It’s been awhile since I cleaned out my spam folder and deleted anti-wolf comments. This is just a small sampling, I could write an entire book on these little gems. They’d be laughable if it wasn’t so serious for wolves. They show the mentality wolves are facing and demonstrate once again why wolves need protection under the ESA.

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Wolf Hysteria

“Wolf hysteria (also known as wolf persecution, or rarely, lupophobia) is the widespread public hatred of wolves, incorporating both their enduring role as folk devils, and societal attitudes favouring policies of active persecution of wolves, and opposition and resistance to policies aiming to protect existing wild populations, or reintroduce the species into former ranges where it has become extinct relatively recently. The phenomenon shares much in common with moral panics, including the use of scaremongering, unverifiable anecdotes, demonisation, exaggeration, moral high roading etc., to the extent the phenomenon could be considered a moral panic in and of itself, though it is not commonly referred to as such”…Rational Wiki

REAED MORE : http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Wolf_hysteria

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Idaho bone pickers
Submitted on 2014/10/08 at 7:57 pm
I’ve killed 4, all pups. You all have killed unborn children with your voting skills. Try to not be so hypocritical. You do your thing, we will do ours. Geographical differences are human nature now leave us the fuck alone. Got my 2014 tag ready for this Friday:)
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joe
Submitted on 2014/08/10 at 7:42 pm | In reply to meirad.
I cant wait for this wolf season, so I can get revenge for all the damn wolfs eating my elk!!!!!
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Doug
Submitted on 2014/07/02 at 12:03 am | In reply to nina clausen.
Get your. Head out of the fog and spend a little time in the forests of montana. We have oodles of wolves. I have one of the hog heaven pack myself. Another pack already is in the region once occupied by them,,, less than two years later.
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This comment is  particularly ridiculous since there have been just two controversial wolf/human fatalities in the last 100 years but domestic dogs kill on average 30 people per year and bite millions more. I’m a dog lover but those are the facts. Deer are more dangerous to humans than wolves. Comments like the one below demonstrate the hysteria surrounding wolves. Wolf haters are either sadly misinformed or blindly repeating anti wolf talking points, without having a clue what they’re talking about. 

cheri kessler
Submitted on 2014/06/11 at 10:27 am
I’m sorry but many of these posts seem a little ridiculous. Wolves are dangerous predators who attack people and will hunt people- including children. They produce large numbers of offspring in a relatively quick amount of time, and they are an alpha predator with nothing to keep them in check. They are not going extinct and are actually becoming quite dangerous because of their large numbers even in northern Colorado. Saying they are more scared of us seems pretty false to me since they are in large packs and weigh around 100 pound each vs 1 person— I know I wouldn’t be scared of much, plus they become accustomed to being around people and get less wary, taking more risks Again, they are a wild animal and if it means living or dying, they will attack you to survive, or your ranch animals which you might rely on financially. There is a reason why in Idaho and Montana they have open season to hunt- to keep the population numbers down and in check, not to just keep killing them needlessly. Just like all other animals with a hunting season, it is to help keep the population healthy.

They are quite beautiful but don’t be fooled, they are also quite dangerous.

And to say anything about killing baby’s—my goodness, really? You would rather have a wolf live and have a child die? That’s disgusting–they are animals–and animals are definitely below my children and any child, and I would hope you feel the same. Not that only your children matter but all children. Children are unable to protect themselves, literally, especially babies–leave them out of this.
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Jim Duggins
Submitted on 2014/06/01 at 8:37 pm | In reply to Marilyn Glasgow.
“Knuckledraggers”. I like how you stereotype everyone in Idaho. All you tree hugging queers will make your wish come true. You won’t be able to reproduce, so the earth will go back to the animals because YOU have destroyed the human species. Gay wad.
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Wolf Killer
Submitted on 2014/05/22 at 7:34 pm
You people are sick. Do you realize that wolves are killing just about every deer, moose, and elk in their area? Not to mention the cattle and sheep they kill. Drive thru Yellowstone and you can count on one hand the number of elk still in the park ..no thanks to these predators. Wolves need to be managed just as much as the rest of the wildlife. What’s wrong with you? Ever seen a deer get eaten by a pack of wolves? It’s not pretty. The deer is usually still alive as it’s back end is eaten. But I guess you have no “feelings” for the animals these wolves kill. Misinformed self righteous idiots.
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Animals are tasty
Submitted on 2014/05/15 at 12:27 pm | In reply to Bonnie Browm.
GO kill yourself you piece of shit!
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Tony
Submitted on 2014/04/28 at 10:29 am
Letting one species stay protected while others are regulated is assanine. These wolves are slowly decimating the wildlife that is hunted by humans already. There must be a system of balance which will require a wolf season. I am not saying kill all the wolves, but keep them from eating themselves out of food.
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J pancheri
Submitted on 2014/04/21 at 4:36 pm | In reply to Kathy Vile.
Yes since wolves show so much mercy on the things they munch on we need more wolve predators like grizzlies and wolverines rippin there guts out and there unborn young.
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joe
Submitted on 2014/03/20 at 7:07 pm | In reply to orionsbeltwolf.
dont you think they would be better off in central park and LA where they would do more good and you can keep them safe
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ggggg
Submitted on 2014/03/12 at 12:49 pm
Kill them all, fuck all of you
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Jim
Submitted on 2014/03/11 at 4:10 pm
There is a reason Wolves were exterminated. They kill everything, that is what they do and they do it well. Living in Alaska and Wyoming I have seen them decimate the Caribou herds and Sheep and Cattle. They have really terrorized the Elk populations in Idaho. The only places big enough and wild enough to support them are Canada and Alaska. I agree it is romantic to see them in the wild but there is not enough room in the lower 48 for them and agriculture. If you made your living raising livestock you would have a different view. I’m sure someone who makes their living sitting in a cubicle will spout off here.
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mark

Submitted on 2014/03/03 at 5:36 pm | In reply to AGNES DELANIS.
Hello, I have no interest in trying to chang anyones mind but would like to offer an alternate opinon.I understand how some could get a distorted picture of the wolf situationbut i must ask myself how many of the wolf advocates or supporters have actually been in the wild for any length of time both pre and then post wolf. The problem is that wolves, unlike man is totally opportunistic and none selective, they inhabit an area( many square miles) until it is practically devoid of game and them move on and repeat. I also doubt that any of you have seen a large wolf pack corner a small heard of elk in deep snow and kill them all ,eat the noses and a little meat then move on leaving the rest to rot or for scavengers. I wont go into detail but watcthing a wolf pack make a kill is anything but humane. If anyone has the guts and respect to engage in a true honest dialogue regarding this i would welcome your response. I love all animals and being in the wilderness no less than anyone alive, and i consider myself qualified to make honest and unbiased observations. wolves are not being eradicated, only managed,unfortunatly to do that some must be culled. Remember ,if we truly revert to natural selection then only the strong survive,you want that in the human world to?
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Charles
Submitted on 2014/02/17 at 3:27 pm
Wolves need to be extermited in the lower 48 states. Not one alive!
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Anna
Submitted on 2014/02/04 at 7:21 pm
I love wolves! I love dogs and I love animals and amen I hate seeing them killed and hunted. It makes me really sad, but we have to look at it from both sides. the wolves are eating the bison and elk calves and are lowering the levels of those animals. sure its not that bad because the elk where getting overpopulated but now they are practically extinct from the park! the wolves are growing into too big amount Also when the elk and bison go extinct because they will be eaten by wolves too often, the wolves will eventually decrease in number because they wont have any prey. and it wouldn’t be a good idea to remove them from the park because it would effect the animals way of life so I think it would either be wise to hunt few of them or take some out of the park to different parts of the US.
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Stu Markell
Submitted on 2014/01/16 at 8:27 pm | In reply to Darren Thomassie.
Good we don’t want your punk Aziz wolf scat eaters here.
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fee spirit
Submitted on 2014/01/09 at 6:48 pm
I will shoot and kill any wolf that come into my site.

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Bill
Submitted on 2013/11/03 at 6:33 pm
Trappers are VITAL in controlling the predation on other animals. Just like every animal, They need to be managed.

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HAHA you guys are so brainwashed into believing anything some citiot would has never held a rifle in his hand or seen a dirt road before has to say about northern Minnesota and what farmers want to do with their land. Really you can think what you want to think and talk about how wolf hunting is inhumane but what you don’t realize is that farmers that are making an honest living raising and selling cattle are losing more and more cattle every year because of huge wolf populations in certain areas. “Murdering wolves”? Seriously you believe that the DNR only has a hunt so that people can Murder wolves? Oh you are so terribly wrong and mistaken. People who live in the city should have no say in what rural people want to do with their land and I am more than happy to take care of some of them wolves for those farmers. And by the way, wolf furs are going for around 800 dollars right now! Cant wait for the December late season! I’ll post a couple pictures of my trophies.

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I think we should capture and release 200 of these snugly little guys and release them in Edina. It would be really neat to see them thrive in that environment.

NatureColdWarriors_3wolves

Top Photo: Courtesy Rational Wiki

Bottom Photo: Courtesy Nature Cold Warriors

Posted in: Wolf Wars, gray wolf

Tags: wolf hysteria, moral panic, scaremongering, unverifiable anecdotes, demonization, exaggeration, moral high-roading, Rational Wiki, wolf persecution, anti wolf comments, wolf hatred, ridiculous comments, stupidity

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Wolf Hysteria And Moral Panics

Wolf Paranoia:

A typical wolf about to take your children and eat your job

April 6, 2012

It’s time to repost this powerful analysis of wolf persecution and scapegoating by rationalwiki.com.

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October 9, 2o11

I was doing research into the origins of wolf persecution and came across an excellent entry by Rational Wiki on the subject of wolf hysteria.  It outlines the major tenets of wolf persecution, describing how common sense and measured thinking are thrown out the window by those who seek to demonize wolves and blame them for all the world’s ills.

I’m presenting the Rational Wiki entry just as its written, it explains the roots of wolf  hysteria and how it’s used to persecute and scapegoat the wolf.

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From RationalWiki.com

Wolf hysteria

(also known as wolf persecution, or rarely, lupophobia) is the widespread public hatred of wolves, incorporating both their enduring role as folk devils, and societal attitudes favouring policies of active persecution of wolves, and opposition and resistance to policies aiming to protect existing wild populations, or reintroduce the species into former ranges where it has become extinct relatively recently.

The phenomenon shares much in common with moral panics,  including the use of scaremongering, unverifiable anecdotesdemonisation, exaggeration, moral highroading etc., to the extent the phenomenon could be considered a moral panic in and of itself, though it is not commonly referred to as such.

Hot-button issues

Fierce, and often aggressively negative perceptions of wolves have a long history in western (and many other) cultures. However, the main issues triggering a renewed outpouring of hysteria often stems from any proposal (real or simply made up) from a few major “hot button” issues:

Predation of livestock

Attempts to introduce/extend protections for wolves

Attempts to re-introduce wolves to areas where they had become locally extinct

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Manning Moral Barricades

The most shrill cries attesting to the apparently limitless evils of the wolf arise, unsurprisingly, from the livestock industry. It claims that predation of livestock by wolves is rampant, and that seeing the unending bloodbath caused by these “specialists in carnage” causes those who raise animals to slaughter en-masse for meat, to be emotionally distraught by, well, the killing of animals for meat.

In the USA an equally unsurprising alliance with hunting and game interest, numerous front organisations and astroturf operations has been established, including the Abundant Wildlife Society of North America (AWSNA) and the National Animal Interest Alliance (NAIA)[1]. They have been aided and abetted by the wider so-called “conservative conservationist” movement (itself usually astroturf or greenwashing for forestry, hunting and agriculture interests), such as Conservation Force, but perhaps best illustrated by Mike Dubrasich and his Western Institute for Study of the Environment (WISE) / SOSForests,who couches his arguments in terms of concern for the environment, though sometimes veers into extreme right-wing conspiracy theories about the federal government, in alliance with “eco-facists” deliberately introducing wolves (aka “blood-thirsty predators”)[2] to the mid-west (along with forest fires and various other things).

The arguments

Wolves cause significant losses to livestock producers

A common refrain is that attacks (predation) on livestock by wolves is a significant, or even one of the main, losses incurred by livestock producers.

In the USA emphasis is placed primarily on the financial side, and also often emphasises that the inclusion of the wolf within the Endangered Species Act violates “property rights” and “constitutional freedoms”. The “emotional trauma” suffered by livestock producers as a result of predation is also frequently mentioned.

“It may destroy our livelihood and our major lifestyle is in jeopardy.”

“Judging from their rapidly expanding populations across the West, it is obvious that wolf populations are healthy. Our concern is whether we’ll be able to say the same thing about the West’s ranchers in years to come.[4]”

Firstly, though these organisations are ready to give the numbers of livestock affected by predation, these are never given as percentages, or even stated in relation to total herd numbers. In most states the losses of livestock due to wolf predation was <1%. In the state of Wyoming, which lies entirely within the Yellowstone re-introduction area the number varied depending on year between 0.9% and 2% in the period 2000-2005, averaging under 1% over the period. This compares with 33.7% to 48.3% over the same period for losses due to coyotes, 4.1% to 10.9% due to eagles, and from 11.2% to 20.7% due to weather. Indeed, poison, often left by livestock producers to kill wolves and other predators, was often responsible for a greater proportion of losses than those due to wolf predation.[5]

Emotional trauma is of course impossible to either prove or disprove, but it is important to remember that livestock is ultimately reared for slaughter, either to directly obtain the primary products (meat and hides) or as means of profitably disposing of “spent” dairy or wool herds/flocks. Thus one would expect anyone working in the livestock industry to deal with the death and processing of animals into food and other end-products as part of the day to day running of their business. It is highly unlikely that any individual emotionally disturbed by the slaughter of animals for meat or other products would find livestock work tolerable as a long time career.

The inclusion of wolves in the ESA provides a mechanism for financial compensation to be paid for damages caused by wolves in partnership with the Wolf Compensation Trust,[6] and in the case of wolves found in the act of attacking livestock or other domesticated animals within private property, it is permissible for the owner to take measures necessary to protect them. Therefore it is hard to see how such an act can be a “violation” of rights.

Wolves decimate game herds

“All wolves must be eliminated to restore our big game herds.[7]”

The Canadian wolves have decimated our elk, mule deer and moose populations to lows not seen since the ’60s.[8]

There has been considerable hysteria over the impact of wolf populations on herds of elk. However the National Park Service studies indicate that wolf reintroduction to the park, a major reserve for elk herds, would have negligible affect on hunting activities, and that the effect of wolf predation on elk populations would not, in and of itself, have an impact sufficient to be the decisive factor in elk population management.[9]

Although the reasons behind fluctuating wild animal populations are complex, Drs. Doug Smith, Daniel Stahler and John Vucetich conducted a joint National Park Service-MTU study into elk population at Yellowstone. Their findings found that:[10]
Elk population remained stable from the re-introduction of wolves in 1995 through to 2000, at around 17,000

In the period 2000-2004 the population dropped 50% to 8,334. During this period the Yellowstone area experienced drought conditions, and increased hunting of Elk by humans.

Though hunting permits did not allow for a kill level equivalent to the total population drop, the researchers concluded that hunting, led to a “super-additive” effect, whereby a 1% direct loss rate due to hunting was magnified to significant degree due to knock-on effects, which were only exacerbated by drought conditions.[10] Although wolf predation was acknowledged to exist, it’s effect on the large population drops seen was regarded as a minor, largely insignificant factor:

“Our analysis indicates that there is greater justification for believing that the harvest rate and severe climate, together, account for at least much of the decline[10]”

Wolves attack humans all the time

Whilst it is known that wolf attacks on humans do occur, those engaged in wolf hysteria deliberately exaggerate the risk out of all proportion to implant the idea in their audience that all wolves routinely kill and eat humans.

“Wolves are blood-thirsty predators that attack and kill pets, livestock, children, and adults.[11]”

“Around here we shoot blood-thirsty predators before they kill our horses, cattle, sheep, or children.[11”

“258 Congressional Members Support Funding for Mexican Wolves Stalking Children and Wolves Terrorizing Rural Citizens[12]”

The facts in no way bear out such hysteria. Those involved in wolf hysteria often recount reports from the 18th and 19th centuries recanting real or imagined wolf attacks in Europe and Asia. Although European wolf subspecies are less wary of humans, and are able to live near higher-density human populations than their North American cousins there are no reports of attacks.

[13] As the map clearly shows, no wolf subspecies present on the Eurasian landmass is present on the North American landmass.

Statistics compiled by Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA) on global wild (not captive) wolf attacks show that in the period 1950-2000, (50 years) there were only 13 confirmed cases of wolf attacks on humans in North America, none of which were fatal.[14].

In the United States alone (not the whole of North America), approximately 1 million reported instances of domestic dogs biting humans per year, with an average of 16 to 18 fatal attacks per annum.

(According to Wikimedia Commons,  It is estimated that two percent of the US population, 4.7 million people, are bitten (by dogs) each year.[3] In the 1980s and 1990s the US averaged 17 fatalities per year, while in the 2000s this has increased to 26.[4] 77% of dog bites are from the pet of family or friends, and 50% of attacks occur on the dog owner’s property.[4])

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Wolves spread disease

Groups and politicians opposed to wolf conservation often use the claim that wolves spread diseases to livestock and game populations. [15] Whilst wolf populations, like that of any wild animal, carry disease, as apex predators they are more often than not a “dead end” for transmission of disease, and are of little concern when it comes to disease management in most livestock and game populations.[15]

The most serious diseases affecting wolf populations are those which also affect domestic canines, parvo, mange and intestinal worms.[16]In all cases, transmission of the disease is driven infinitely more by domestic dogs than wolves, and it is believed that in most cases these diseases have been introduced to the wolf population by domestic dogs.  A notable exception is the presence of mange in North American wolf populations in the Rocky mountains. This population was deliberately infected by government veterinarians in 1909 as an attempt to “exterminate” the wolf population, spread to coyotes and other mammals, and eventually re-infected wolves upon their reintroduction to the area.

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A common refrain is that the only effective solution to any or all of the above is to drastically reduce the population of wolves. This inevitably entails lethal intervention on the part of humans. Such actions are proposed by many livestock producers as the panacea to all ills, and is, unsurprisingly, encouraged and guided by the hunting, trapping and fur lobby organisations, which naturally present themselves as the only viable way of going about any such lethal solution. Alas, many hunting methods are exceedingly inhumane, with methods such as leg traps being commonplace in North America, though are banned in the EU due to concerns over its inhumane nature.[19]

Other excessively cruel/inhumane methods used include hunting wolves using specially trained flocks of eagles, a method historically and currently used in Central Asia,[20] and recommended in proposals to open up the hunting of wolves in the lower 48 states of the US.[21]

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See Footnotes

http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Wolf_hysteria

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Meet The Wolf….Fact Not Fiction

https://howlingforjustice.wordpress.com/2010/11/06/meet-the-wolffacts-not-fiction/

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Tracking science: Biologist’s findings show forest diversity, health influenced by wolves

Written and photographed by MICHAEL JAMISON of the Missoulian | Posted: Sunday, October 25, 2009 9:00 am

POLEBRIDGE – A clinging mist quieted the morning meadow, the icy hem of its robes brushing silent against autumn’s crackling knee-high grass.

In the darkest shadows, the cold crunch of snow remained, criss-crossed with wolf tracks, bear tracks, elk and deer tracks. Scat and bone and hair and hide. These were the morning news reports written in muddied prints, each with a thin film of ice.

Cristina Eisenberg scanned the headlines, then waded into the meadow to read the particulars.

“It’s all here,” the researcher said. “You just have to know the language.”

To the west, ranging grasslands rose gently to an aspen knoll, the trees all tall white ghosts trembling in the dull gloom of fog. A low row of leafy 10-footers skirted the meadow, backed by a towering canopy now a week or more past fall’s golden height.

There were small young trees, and tall old trees, but no middle-aged aspens and that, combined with the frozen tracks, told Eisenberg something very important about this place.

Until about 1920, wolves patrolled these meadows, which have long been an important wintering ground for elk. Then humans hunted the predators into extinction here, and for 60 years or more the elk grazed in peace. By the mid-1980s, however, wolves were recolonizing the landscape, straying south from Canada to reclaim this western fringe of Glacier National Park.

The 100-year-old aspens grew up with wolves. So did the 20-year-olds. There are no middle-agers, Eisenberg said, because without wolves to run the elk, all the young aspen sprouts were browsed to death.

“It is,” she said, “clear and profound. The wolves leave an indelible mark on the entire ecosystem.”

READ MORE: http://missoulian.com/lifestyles/territory/article_3ec9fc54-c01f-11de-bf16-001cc4c002e0.html

Photo: Courtesy Rational Wiki

Posted in: Wolf  Wars, Wolf Myths

Tags: Wolf hysteria, moral panics, scaremongering, demonization of wolves, livestock industry, hunting lobbies

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