The Wolf In Our Heads…Understanding Canis Lupus

February 26,2010

Who is the wolf?  So much has been written about this magnificent animal yet do we really know the wolf?  We can recite facts about them. They mate for life, they’re smart, playful, their lives are structured around family. Wolves can knock off  fifteen to twenty-five miles in one clip without breaking a sweat, they can reach 40 miles an hour when chasing prey. Their wanderlust drives them to explore new places, to investigate, they are curious. Wolves love to move, they are perpetually in motion when awake.

Pack life is ordered, every wolf  has a place. Usually only the alpha pair (mothers and fathers) will breed but not always.  The famed Hog Heaven Pack, who was slaughtered by Wildlife Services in 2008, had twenty-seven members and TWO breeding females.  The year they were killed they produced 15 pups, all gunned down with the rest of the pack, in that grim November.

The idea that wolves fight for top dog position in the pack  has been disputed by wolf researchers.The term alpha is actually considered outdated in the wolf research community.

“Rather than viewing a wolf pack as a group of animals organized with a “top dog”that fought its way to the top, or a male-female pair of such aggressive wolves, science has come to understand that most wolf packs are merely family groups formed exactly the same way as human families are formed. That is, maturing male and female wolves from different packs disperse, travel around until they find each other and an area vacant of other wolves but with adequate prey, court, mate, and produce their own litter of pups.”

Basically a wolf pair mates, has puppies and the adults then become the natural leaders because pups follow their parents authority. The pack eventually becomes a large extended family.  Of course there are exceptions to this, as with everything pertaining to wolves. They are not easily defined.

So how did the wolf become vilified? It all starts with the images and stories we’re exposed to as kids. Many children grow up to fear wolves because the wolf is often demonized in fairy tales. We’re all familiar with those stories. Little Red Riding Hood, on her way to grandma’s house, must walk through the woods where the Big, Bad Wolf  lurks.

A girl has been given red cap (or cloak and hood) to wear. Her mother sends her to take food to her sick grandmother. The mother tells her she must not stop on the way.  A wolf sees the girl walking through the woods and makes a plan to eat her. The wolf politely asks the girl where she is going. The girl answers him, because he seems friendly. The wolf tells the girl to pick some flowers for her grandmother. While she is picking flowers, the wolf goes to grandmother’s house and eats her. He puts on the grandmother’s night-cap and gets into her bed. When the girl goes into grandmother’s house the wolf eats the girl too. A woodcutter comes and cuts opens the wolf’s body. He saves the grandmother and the girl who are still alive. Then, stones are put in the wolf’s body to kill the wolf.

The Three Little Pigs portray the wolf as evil. The pigs are characterized as industrious, just minding their own business, when along comes the Big, Bad Wolf who wants to blow their houses down and eat them.

The first little pig builds a house of straw, but a wolf blows it down and eats the first little pig. The second pig builds a house of sticks, but with the same ultimate result. Each exchange between wolf and pig features ringing proverbial phrases, namely:

“Little pig, little pig, let me in!”
“Not by the hair on my chinny-chin-chin!”
“Then I’ll huff, and I’ll puff, and I’ll blow your house down!”

The third pig builds a house of hard bricks. The wolf cannot huff and puff hard enough to blow the house down. He attempts to trick the little pig out of the house, but the pig outsmarts him at every turn. Finally, the wolf resolves to come down the chimney, whereupon the pig boils a pot of water into which the wolf plunges, at which point the pig quickly covers the pot and cooks the wolf for supper.

And of course we can’t forget the werewolf.  This may be the most damaging image of all because it permeates our culture with movie after movie depicting vicious, ravenous creatures, turning from man to wolf.

People are fascinated yet repelled by the idea of  half wolf /half human creatures. Once again the wolf is portrayed as dangerous, something to be feared.

The werewolf is a mythical creature that appears in European culture as far back as the times of the ancient Greeks. The culprit was believed to transform into a wolf or a ‘wolf-man’, an affliction either brought about by a curse or through the use of magic.

Ancient cultures across the world ascribed shape shifting abilities to the most dangerous animals they came in contact with; in Africa it was the lion, in India it was the snake and tiger and in Europe it was the white wolf, suggesting that the myth might have come about from mans need to invent stories.

The truth is the wolf is not bad or evil.  They are apex predators struggling  to survive in an ever hostile world, trying to eek out a living and care for their families. That’s it.

For the wolf it’s all about familia. They are the ultimate role models on great parenting. Pack structure is held together by the intense loyalty they feel toward each other. Admirable traits in any species.

Why don’t we read more about wolves’ wonderful altruistic qualities in the media? Because most are too busy reporting the “party line” from fish and game agencies.

Wolves once  prospered in all parts of the world.

As Barry Lopez states in “Of Wolves and Men”:

“The wolf once roamed most of the Northern Hemisphere above thirty degrees north latitude.  They were found in Eastern Europe, The Balkans, the near Middle East into Arabia, Afghanistan,  Northern India, throughout Russia north into Siberia, China and Japan.

He goes on:  “In North America the wolf reached a southern limit north of Mexico City and ranged north as far as Cape Morris Jessup, Greenland, less than four hundred miles from the North Pole.  Outside of  Iceland and North Africa, and such places as the Gobi Desert.  Wolves had adapted to virtually every habitat available to them.”

Historic US  Gray Wolf Range. Map: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

“Native Americans were awed by the power and stealth of the wolf, while European settlers — who brought over their folk tales of the “big bad wolf” — feared the animal. This fear, combined with the belief that wolves caused widespread livestock losses, led to their near extinction in the lower 48 states in the early half of the 20th century.”

Wolves were hated by the first Europeans that landed on this continent and they brought their wolf exterminating ways with them.  Europe had been sanitized of most of their wolves to clear the land for ranching and farming. They carried their wolf prejudice to America and within four hundred years wolves were extirpated from the lower forty-eight. An epic tragedy.

The impetus that started the wolf carnage in America was the early European settler’s slaughter of bison and other ungulates.  They literally killed everything with four hooves from bison to moose, deer and elk. They robbed wolves of their prey base.

As Rick Bass states in The Ninemile Wolves, “In the absence of bison, there was the bison’s replacement: cattle. The wolves preyed upon these new intruders, without question but the ranchers and the government overreacted just a tad.  Until very recently, the score stood at Cows, 99,200,000; Wolves, O.

Of the men that took part in the pogrom, what can we say of them? What wolves were dwelling in their heads while they poisoned, shot, set wolves on fire, fed them ground glass and other tortures too gruesome to mention? What were they thinking of the wolf as they laid their strychnine laden meat trap-lines?  What was their image of the wolf?  A pest, a bounty to be collected, did they feel anything about this animal that had done them no harm?  We can never know but we can guess.

Today there are pockets of wolves scattered throughout Europe. Russia still has wolves, although they have virtually no protection and can be shot on sight.  The largest population of wolves reside in Alaska and Canada.  Of the twenty-three subspecies that existed, seven are now extinct.

Mankind did a very good job of decimating wolf populations. But in the 1980’s a few wolves returned to their western habitat in Glacier National Park, long before their official reintroduction to Yellowstone  and Central Idaho in 1995.  Wolves today inhabit a tiny fraction of their historic range and are still fighting the same persecution they faced a hundred years ago.

The image of the wolf has taken on almost mythical proportions. Does anyone truly see the wolf  for who it really is?  For a few they are evil, hunting machines and possess no redeeming qualities. I receive comments  from angry people who rail against wolves and how they kill their prey, as if there’s a polite way for predators to kill. Wolves are held to a different standard. No predator kills nicely, not African lions, not grizzly bears, not Great White sharks, not mountain lions, and definitely NOT HUMANS.  I don’t know of a single case of wolves shooting their prey from helicopters with twelve gauge shotguns, or using leghold traps. That kind of killing is the domain of the deadliest predator on earth, man!

Wolves kill to survive.  They were put on this earth to keep ungulate herds healthy.

Every time wolves hunt they risk broken ribs or cracked skulls by a well placed kick. Wolves’ lives are hard. Yet they are demonized for being predators. What about the gut shot deer wandering the forests during hunting season, leaving blood trails? Take a trip through the thousands of YouTube videos that depict disgusting canned hunts or document the glee with which some hunters display brutal killing methods of our wildlife. Who’s responsible for the torture of  animals in factory farms, it’s not the wolf?

It all goes back to the image one has of the wolf.  If people grow up believing the myths and half-truths about wolves, they’ll carry those biases into adulthood.  I believe those who hate wolves have projected their fears about themselves onto the wolf.

“Throughout the centuries we have projected on to the wolf the qualities we most despise and fear in ourselves.” -Barry Lopez

For most the wolf is an icon of freedom and beauty, a symbol of untamed wildness.  As Barry Lopez described them so beautifully in Of Wolves and Men.

The wolves will “travel together ten or twenty miles a day,  through the country where they live, eating and sleeping, birthing, playing with sticks, chasing ravens, growing old, barking at bears, scent marking trails, killing moose and staring at the way water in a creek breaks around their legs and flows on.”

That’s the wolf in my head. Who’s the wolf in yours?

=========

Coastal British Columbia wolves love salmon!

There’s always something new to learn about wolves!


Repost: Original posting February 26,2010

Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Cartoon: A Puritan Thanksgiving….Dan Beard

Posted in: gray wolf/canis lupus, howling for justice, biodiversity

Tags: wolf enigma, canis lupus, wolf myths, fairy tales, little red riding hood, family

Advertisements

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://howlingforjustice.wordpress.com/2015/02/10/the-wolf-in-our-heads-understanding-canis-lupus/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

33 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Do people realize that those fairy tales weren’t actually about the animals,but the government? Back in those days to speak out against your governing advisors was punishable possibly even with death,so to spread word secretly about the government rhymes,riddles and fairy tales were made to cover up the governmental slander. Wolves really had nothing to do with it!! Native Americans lived with animals in harmony,even having wolves as friends,pets,and they were even pictured in some old drawings pulling travoise as the tribes moved around. The early European Americans could have learned so much from the Native Americans about animals and respecting them,but look what they did to the Native Americans too!! Such a shame!!

    Like

    • Personally Laurie I don’t think wolf haters are deep thinkers. They repeat the talking points fed to them by their masters without really giving it much thought. The nasty comments I receive are very unoriginal. Wolves are bad, wolf lovers are hippies who live in big cities, we all wear Birkenstocks and eat granola. They want to send all the wolves to New York, San Francisco, etc. And on and on. It’s the same old same old, we just don’t understand these poor downtrodden wolf haters and what they have to put up with, even though most of them have never seen a wild wolf in their life and never will. In other words, they’re full of crap.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

  2. Man fears things he cannot see. (Fairy tales sure do not help, as some people actually believe that these fables are based on facts.) Man hears the wolves howl, but does not see them, sees the wolves’ footprints, but the wolf remains invisible. There is something about the wolf that man fears within himself.

    Like

    • Very well said Anne and so true.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

      • Man fears the mystery of wolves and all creatures that they do not understand and they cannot see. Thus all the evil and horrible stories people have created and believed.

        Like

  3. thank you for posting this article,nabeki.so much of man’s intolerance stems from pure ignorance.if we can just keep trying to educate and change this old myth of the “demon wolf”,things Might Might begin to change.it always amazes me how terrified people are of things they do not understand.and sometimes what we don’t know Can be scary..and yet , also they are opportunities for learning and growth…so ,come on folks,you wolf haters out there, there is more than enough information on the reality of the virtues of the wolf to let that old vilifying storyline GO..if you hang on to it,all it does is brings you down to a very low,ignorant,base state of being and it is simply cowardly to drag that beautiful, highly evolved creature with you.but, the sad thing is that since we humans are given a brain to make choices,so many choose to stay stuck..wish i were more upbeat this a.m…i like what the comment just before mine said..yes..maybe the man’s fear does stem from a unseen SIDE OF HIMSELF,ONE WHICH WOULD SO ENLIGHTEN HIS LIFE ,SHOULD HE SO CHOOSE TO LOOK within.

    Like

    • It’s a difficult subject for us helen because we love wolves and don’t understand the unbridled hatred directed at them. They’re the ultimate scapegoats. Consequently all the bold wolves have been selected out by the demonization and killing of their species. Wolves that are reclusive and fearful of humans have the best chance for survival. That’s why Yellowstone and Glacier National Park wolves are so vulnerable, because they’ve lost their fear of humans and make easy targets when they leave the park.

      It breaks my heart over and over again to see them treated in this way. They are such incredibly amazing animals.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

  4. Interesting piece.

    I chalk up humanity’s intolerance for strong predators to our inability to share for the most part.

    We want it all and we want it now. We can all see how that’s gone.

    Like

    • So true Linda, we’re a selfish species. Everything is me, me, me and it’s getting worse by the day. We have to be thankful there are still good people who care and work to try and make a better world. If only there were more.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

  5. Perfect title – I’ve been searching for a way to describe the strange way humans have viewed wolves over the millennia – subjective? Irrational? Imaginative (and not in the positive sense)? And then there’s the human tendency to obsessively ‘study’ something, and collect and possess.

    ‘The wolf in our heads’ describes it well. An animal picked to serve as a scapegoat for all human frailties and failings, with very little of it based in reality. I look forward to reading this through.

    Here’s another poor creature that was driven extinct by humans because, after overhunting and overcollecting, it was thought to be a witch by humans! Doesn’t it just make you want to vomit?

    http://www.omgfacts.com/lists/10093/The-last-seen-Great-Auk-was-killed-because-people-thought-it-was-a-witch

    Like

    • So true ida, we all see the wolf differently. Those that appreciate them for the immaculate predators that they are, are forever gifted with that rich experience. Those that demonize them will never see the wolf through our eyes. The wolf in their heads is really a reflection of their own demons. I think it’s called transference.

      I love Barry Lopez’s quote, it’s the way the wolves live in my head.

      The wolves will….“travel together ten or twenty miles a day, through the country where they live, eating and sleeping, birthing, playing with sticks, chasing ravens, growing old, barking at bears, scent marking trails, killing moose and staring at the way water in a creek breaks around their legs and flows on.”

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

  6. I, for one, am educating my children and the people I work with about the true nature of wolves. Instead of teaching our kids to embrace Islam, as the one who occupies the White House is now pushing in our public schools, I would much rather see teaching an appreciation of our wildlife and natural resources. Before anything will change, it must become a major political issue and affect the outcome of elections. We certainly won’t get any support for Butch Otter and his great white hunter friends.

    Like

    • You’re absolutely on target Steve.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

    • Steve, Obama has been persecuting wolves since he took office. One of his first edicts was to delist wolves along with his rancher Interior Secretary, Ken Salazar. Obama is clueless when it comes to wolves. He’s been a disaster for them since he took office. Worse then George Bush and I never though that could be possible. Now his USFWS is planning on delisting wolves nationally, there are also plans to delist Yellowstone grizzly bears. The Democrat Senate voted almost unanimously, except three. to delist wolves in the Northern Rockies forever and always, taking away our right to challenge the delisting in the courts and now the wolf haters are lining up legislation to do it again to wolves in the Great Lakes and Wyoming. Who would ever have thought?

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

  7. A sad history of unfounded prejudice. Happy to see the beautiful video. I do hope people learn something here. If it saves one wolf it’s worth it.

    Like

    • That’s what I’m hoping brigid67 (:

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

  8. Very nice post. Thank you so much.

    I had the great fortune of being able to observe a wolf pack on a regular basis when I worked in Yellowstone. What I observed was devotion to family, a fierce protection of pups and a great love for them, moments of playfulness, joy, relaxation, and bonding, and both successful and unsuccessful attempts at bringing down prey.

    A few times near dusk I watched the entire pack (minus a baby sitter and the pups) head out on a hunt, and it was absolutely thrilling to see them move single file along the treeline, out into the night. Once in September, I watched the pack bring the pups along from the rendezvous site on a “training exercise” as they headed out to hunt. The adults attempted to bring down a bison calf. The attempt was unsuccessful, but the pups certainly got the idea!

    These are the wolves in my head, in my heart, and in my memory. Indeed, I will never forget them, the breath taking moments they provided, nor the many lessons that they taught me.

    Forever and always, wolves belong.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Joanne, I was feeling philosophical that day (:

      Loved that you shared your wonderful experiences with us. If only we lived in a world where more people appreciated the natural world.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

      • You’re welcome, Nabeki. Thanks for all that you do.

        Like

  9. Reblogged this on Exposing the Big Game.

    Like

  10. Received a response yesterday from Senator Risch of Idaho. I had asked him to oppose delisting. His letter is not a bit apologetic. He approves of wolf “management” in Idaho (i.e., maximum persecution) and states “I strongly support the removal of federal protection for wolves under the Endangered Species Act.” I envision Risch curled up in his crib, sucking his thumb and wide-eyed at the fairy tales. His position may stem from ignorance, from affinity with the ag industrial complex, from his affinity for recreational killing — or more realistically, all three. Idaho is completely hopeless, you know. With 62.5% of Idaho consisting of federal lands, the only hope I see is galvanizing the non-Idaho “owners” (every citizen of the US has an ownership stake in federal lands) to demand a policy of wholeness in “management” of public lands. Translation = Hands off the wildlife. Should that ever come to pass, I envision Risch thrashing around in his crib, red-faced with fury, issuing hideous wailing and screaming.

    Like

    • Pamela..Well he shouldn’t have bothered to bore you with his blather. It’s always the same talking points, you’d think they’d come up with something original at this point. As you said Idaho is hopeless, I’m so sorry they released the wolves there. What a nightmare for them. And they’ve been killing wolves there even before they were delisted by Obama in 2009, Wildlife Services did plenty of wolf killing in Montana, Idaho the Great Lakes, etc… when wolves were supposed to be protected. I remember when the Hog Heaven Pack was slaughtered back in 2008. I think there were 27 wolves in the pack, 2 breeding females and 15 puppies, all destroyed. People were outraged in Kalispell but then people almost always are outraged by Wildlife Services but they just keep on doing what they’re doing, seemingly answering to nobody. Idaho is the same way, no matter how much people protest they just keep killing wolves. It’s like death by a thousand cuts.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

  11. We should have slipped past the dark ages long ago and wake up the voices of modern science and their opinions about our wolves. These Dark Age voices exist today in modern fiction as writers use certain animals as metaphors for their bad guys or antagonists in modern fiction.

    I recently read one fiction book, and the author used big, bad wolf seven times in one fiction novel. They also demonize snakes and reptiles when the bad guy has ” a reptilian smile “. Absolutely Amazing.

    Aldo Leopold in his Thinking Like a Mountain asks, “What’s Earth’s opinion of her wolves?” Didn’t Earth select wolves for America?

    And, we have pushed extinct several tribes of wolves in America and in Mexico.

    Like

    • Tess…I was watching a show called the New Wild, it’s on PBS and they were talking about the role of predators and how they keep the plains healthy. Not just by keeping large herds of animals on the move but herding them into tight bunches. Apparently this allows the herds to roto-till the earth, allowing the grasses to grow, fostering a healthy ecosystem. I think this is called the “ecology of fear”. Remove the predators and the herds spread out and trample the grasses, everything dries up and the habitat is ruined. Predators manage large herds by keeping them moving and in a tight bunch. It’s a win, win for the animals and the plains. You’ll never hear that from a so called “hunter conservationist”, the cruelest oxymoron if there ever was one. Their idea of conservation is buying a hunting tag, wearing camo, hiding in a blind, luring unsuspecting animals with scents and predators calls, trudging around in the woods or using an ATV or just their own rig until they find something to shoot. Am I painting all hunters with a broad brush? Yep.

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

      • Unfortunately, the New Wild programs present these issues from the viewpoint of Conservation International, which has ties to Walmart, Northrup Grumman and other large corporations. The second program in the series featured Alan Savory, the former Rhodesian game rancher who believes that livestock grazing is good for the environment. He claims to be able to “mimic” the activity of predators by moving livestock from one area to another. He readily acknowledges his responsibility for killing tens of thousands of elephants, but claims to have learned from this experience.

        In some ways, Savory’s pseudoscience of holistic management is a continuation of Aldo Leopold. After regretting killing one wolf too many, Leopold went on to found the pseudoscience of wildlife management to determine “scientifically” how many to kill. The more environmental groups follow Leopold, the more they grow to accept the so-called hunter-conservation model.

        Like

      • Marc….I wasn’t endorsing the show, just discussing something I thought had value, which is how important predators are to the health of ecosystems.

        “The second program in the series featured Alan Savory, the former Rhodesian game rancher who believes that livestock grazing is good for the environment. He claims to be able to “mimic” the activity of predators by moving livestock from one area to another. He readily acknowledges his responsibility for killing tens of thousands of elephants, but claims to have learned from this experience.”

        Yes he’s a disturbing guy, walking with his “best buddy” the elephant, after having been involved with the killing of thousands of elephants, now he’s suddenly discovered their value.

        For the wolves, For the wild ones,
        Nabeki

        Like

  12. The wolf boy of Hesse, Germany, stated later in life that he enjoyed the company of wolves more than humans. While the wolves did nip and pinch him on several occasions to correct his behaviour, sometime after his ‘rescue’ (his surrogate mother was arrowed to death trying to protect him) an orphanage worker thought that dicipline meant holding holding the boy by his neck out of a window on a higher floor.

    Like

    • John, I agree with the wolf boy of Hesse, Germany. I prefer the company of wolves, in fact I prefer the company of animals period, especially my dogs. They always greet me like I’m the Queen of England, they treat me with kindness, they accept me for who I am and love me unconditionally, especially when I have a few treats in my pocket :).

      For the wolves, For the wild ones,
      Nabeki

      Like

      • A dog or cat has my undivided attention, humans normally do not 😛 I gravitate to them as they are usually more pleasant to be around. Humans are convoluted, strange creatures that rarely make any logical sense.
        That being said, dogs are master manipulators.

        Like

  13. I’ve seemed to notice that in recent years there has been more demonization of wolves in the media; is it really increasing or am I just paying more attention to it now?

    Like

    • Indeed, wolves have become popular lately and while that is good in some aspects, people still seem to only care about their teeth if you know what I mean. Maybe a bit of both?

      I personally grew up with movies like Plague Dogs and Watership Down, series like Animals of Farthing Wood and The Wild Thornberrys. These days I think a lot of the problem comes from an impatient and overly simplified society, people aren’t interested in details anymore – it’s all ‘action’ and no substance. People don’t stop to take a closer look at things so much and that’s where they miss out on the aspects that are most important.

      Like

  14. Did you guys hear that the USFWS just confirmed that Echo the Grand Canyon Wolf is dead? Her DNA matched that of the wolf murdered in Utah back in December. This is so tragic! May she Rest in Peace. 😦

    Like

  15. :Sighs: Okay, I’m not trying to ”role play” by saying :sighs: How about I get to the point of this comment…. Wolves, oh yes the most amazing, beautiful, out of this world into the galaxy animal. Well, Most famous wolf in the world Shot, <==== Seriously. Wolves, in a super Bowl commercial, being made out to look like a evil animal, and now people think, ''Oh hey I can draw a stupid drawing, of a wolf dying, or a wolf with red evil eyes, lets get started. oh, OH… OHHHH no. your telling me that your going to do that? Not over my dead body buddy. Because here is one thing everyone must know.. Is this your world… like, are you the king or queen of this world? nope, the queen of England, is the queen of England. The ''host'' of TV shows, or the ''director'' of movies, or the ''editor'' of the video. they are not the queen, or kings. they are the response you get when you call… I may be getting off topic, but hey I'ma person, I'm, not a ''director, I'm not a TV host, im not a youtuber. But, I am a human being. with a voice. You cant count out a wolves voice like this! animals only talk in the movies, or cartoon's. And, people know that in the ''Buisness'' they know, well DUHHHH No animal has a voice, maybe Albert Einstein invented it? Well not found yet so I can make them look bad, Cause I can.. But you cant! when someone, or something doesn't have a voice they seem to fade… but really? Its a animal! it cant talk, now if this was about a human. then well I mean I guess its still rude! but humans can talk… BUT ANIMALS CANT AIR HEAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! GAWD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Stop this….. this isn't the world I want to live in.. but is this the world we do live in? It is I guess… But I wont give up, I wont stop until people realize, wolves do have a voice. animals have a voice. its my mission. and I'm going to complete it. NO matter what… -Carly. ❤ 🙂

    #HowlingForJustice.

    Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: