“For the animal shall not be measured by man…Henry Beston


“We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals. Remote from universal nature and living by complicated artifice, man in civilization surveys the creature through the glass of his knowledge and sees thereby a feather magnified and the whole image in distortion. We patronize them for their incompleteness, for their tragic fate for having taken form so far below ourselves. And therein do we err. For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours, they move finished and complete, gifted with the extension of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear. They are not brethren, they are not underlings: they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth.”

Henry Beston 1925

Wolf_All Life Matters pinterest


Bottom Photo: Courtesy Pinterest

Posted in: Biodiversity

Tags: Animal lives matter, biodiversity, Henry Beston

Published in: on October 5, 2015 at 6:49 pm  Comments (19)  
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World’s Largest Wildlife Corridor to Be Built in California


Finally a little good news for wildlife.

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:

James William Gibson, Earth Island Journal | September 27, 2015

Earlier this month an obscure Los Angeles area regional public lands agency—the Mountains Recreation and Conservation Authority—announced the first stages of a five-year plan to build one of the largest wildlife corridors in the world. The goal is to create a natural looking bridge that will allow a small cougar population in the Santa Monica Mountain National Recreation Area the chance to escape north into much larger public lands, while at the same time allowing northern mountain lions the chance to move south and help out the badly inbred and lethally infighting Santa Monica cougars.

Although a young female from the Santa Monica Mountains, P33, did successfully cross Highway 101 in March this year, her escape north is a rare event. Photo credit: Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area
Although a young female from the Santa Monica Mountains, P33, did successfully cross Highway 101 in March this year, her escape north is a rare event. Photo credit: Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area

The proposed bridge will leap over Highway 101, an eight-lane, east-west…

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Published in: on September 29, 2015 at 11:55 pm  Comments (9)  

Hunting Wolves Makes You an Asshole

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:

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Published in: on September 27, 2015 at 10:59 pm  Comments (11)  

Wolf Killing Time Upon Us Once Again

Echo NPS

Echo murdered by trophy hunter – 2015

Sadly it’s wolf killing time again in Montana and Idaho. They’ve suffered under the Obama admins. delisting since 2009. Thousands have died and continue to be murdered by trophy hunting thrill killers. Montana now allows individual ranchers or farmers to kill up to 100 wolves annually.

“Private landowners may kill up to 100 wolves a year they believe are threatening livestock, dogs or people under a new state law that doesn’t count toward Montana’s wolf-hunting season.”

The good news is Wyoming, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan wolves are once again protected under the ESA due to a ruling in December 2014 by “U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell.  Judge Howell stated their removal from the ESA was “arbitrary and capricious” and violated the federal Endangered Species Act.”

Federal judge: Great Lakes wolves return to endangered list

By John Flesher, Associated Press5:52 p.m. EST December 19, 2014

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. — A federal judge on Friday threw out an Obama administration decision to remove the gray wolf population in the western Great Lakes region from the endangered species list — a decision that will ban further wolf hunting and trapping in three states.

The order affects wolves in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin, where the combined population is estimated at around 3,700. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service dropped federal protections from those wolves in 2012 and handed over management to the states.

U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell in Washington, D.C., ruled Friday the removal was “arbitrary and capricious” and violated the federal Endangered Species Act.

Unless overturned, her decision will block the states from scheduling additional hunting and trapping seasons for the predators. All three have had at least one hunting season since protections were lifted, while Minnesota and Wisconsin also have allowed trapping.

More than 1,500 Great Lakes wolves have been killed since federal protections were removed, said Jonathan Lovvorn, senior vice president of the Humane Society of the United States, which filed a lawsuit that prompted Howell’s ruling.

“We are pleased that the court has recognized that the basis for the delisting decision was flawed, and would stop wolf recovery in its tracks,” Lovvorn said.

“The science clearly shows that wolves are recovered in the Great Lakes region, and we believe the Great Lakes states have clearly demonstrated their ability to effectively manage their wolf populations,” Shire said. “This is a significant step backward.”

Wolf advocates applauded the ruling Friday.

“We filed the lawsuit to relist the Great Lakes population of wolves,” said Jill Fritz, coordinator of Michigan’s Humane Society of the United States. “It was based on the assertion that the Great Lakes states had proven they could not responsibly manage wolves when they were delisted in January 2012.”

Jodi Habush Sinykin, an attorney for Midwest Environmental Advocates, which supports science-based wildlife management, said the decision should serve as a clear signal of caution to people who would destroy the nation’s wolves.

Minnesota Natural Resources Commissioner Tom Landwehr said agency attorneys will study the ruling before determining its effect on state wolf policy.

“On face value we’re very surprised. We didn’t even know it was coming to a conclusion here,” Landwehr said. “It’s an unusual turn of events.”

Lansing State Journal reporter Louise Knott Ahern contributed to this report.


Click HERE to read the court’s decision!


USFWS wants to delist gray wolves across the lower 48, which would put all wolves in serious jeopardy. USFWS can’t protect wolves now, while they’re still listed, as Echo’s death  and many other gray wolves, who continue to be poached, affirms. The USFWS repeatedly allows trophy hunters to use the tired “I thought it was a coyote excuse ” when poaching endangered wolves. But that comes as no surprise.  Do you think the USFWS gives a damn about wolves or their protection?  They’re too busy looking out for  agribusiness interests, not wolves

So the never-ending battle for canis lupus continues. Montana and Idaho wolves are once again running for their lives.




Idaho – 4

Montana – 12

Wyoming (Protected ESA)

Wisconsin (Protected ESA)

Minnesota (Protected ESA)

Michigan ( Protected ESA)


Oregon – 2 (‘Sled Springs Pair’)

Utah – Echo

Illinois – 2

New Mexico – 1 Ernesta AF1126


North Carolina – 1 endangered red wolf shot by landowner


Photo: Echo – Courtesy NPS

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Montana wolves, Idaho wolves

Tags: ESA, gray wolf hunt, Montana, Idaho, Judge Howell, Echo, wolf persecution, wolf hunts, ‘Sled Springs Pair’, wolf poaching, thrill killing, Ernesta AF1126

Demonizing Wolves

gray wolf dnr wi.gov

September 19, 2015

Here we go again, a wolf supposedly killed a cow in Washington state, on federal land and it makes headlines but what the media never reports is how well-behaved wolves are and what a non-threat they are to ranching or farming.

In 2010, 51,200 cows died in Oregon from non-predation causes. (NASS 2010). That’s right, FIFTY ONE THOUSAND! This should be front page news, right? When wolves are involved in miniscule livestock losses they make the front pages of local media. So what about those 51,200 cows that weren’t killed by wolves? Where are the headlines?  We hear nothing but this.

Oregon had 1,300,000 cattle at the beginning of 2011. Wolves were accused, specifically the Imnaha pack, of 14 cow losses in 1.5 years. Oregon was ready to kill several members of the Imnaha pack over it, including the alpha male OR4, who is OR7’s father. But no exposure about the thousands and thousands of cows keeling over in Oregon from all manner of things, not wolf related such as:

Digestive problems

Respiratory problems

Metabolic problems



Other diseases

Weather related

Calving problems



(NASS 2010) National Agricultural Statistics Service

Meanwhile in 2009  “federal agents associated with the USDA’s Wildlife Services program killed 114,522 mammalian carnivores (including 480 wolves; 82,097 coyotes; and 477 domestic dogs)…… It spent $121 million that year.”  

In a state like Montana, with around 2.5 million cows, ranchers may lose 50 to 60 THOUSAND cattle  annually to non-predation and on average between 60 to 80 to wolves. That is what we’re talking about here folks. Wolf predation on cattle is so overblown it’s ridiculous. Except the media and wolf haters never miss an opportunity to report on any cow killed by a wolf. What incredible hypocrites.

The press exploits wolves for ratings, pure and simple. They know the fringe wolf haters love to read negative articles about wolves. But consider that wolves aren’t even in the running as a true threat to livestock. Coyotes and domestic dogs are the number 1 and 2 predators of livestock followed by mountain lions, then other predators (bears, bobcats or lynx, foxes, wolves, ravens, eagles, vultures ) Wolf predation on cattle is so low they don’t even have their own category but are lumped in with other predators who do miniscule damage. Non-predation, like respiratory illness, reproductive issues, weather, hell even altitude sickness kill thousands upon thousands of cattle every year but we don’t hear about that. You know why, because it doesn’t fit into the anti-wolf agenda in the West and it doesn’t increase ratings.

In reality wolves are extremely shy animals and would prefer to stay as far away from people as possible. And if wolves do kill a few cows or sheep each year it’s mostly because many ranchers don’t practice sound animal husbandry. They use the Columbus method of ranching,  “Let em loose in the Spring and discover em in the Fall”. Those cattle are out there roaming around in remote wilderness areas, not protected, not watched and usually on public land grazing allotments. Hey ranchers, pen up your cattle and stop blaming wolves if they take a cow now and then because you practice careless ranching. That land belongs to the American people and it’s about time the feds start retiring grazing allotments and allow wolves to roam on public land without having to bump into cattle. Wolves should trump cows on public land anyway.  Yet even with millions of cattle out there for the taking, wolves show incredible restraint and prefer to diet on their natural prey of elk and deer. That’s the kind of self-control they’re capable of but rarely get credit for.

So shame on the press for reporting on every single little misdeed they think wolves have committed when the real truth is the biggest threat to cattle is non-predation and being slaughtered for food.

Here’s a post I did  on the Washington Wedge Pack, who were eventually murdered for this very type of persecution.


ACTION ALERT: Washington Wedge Wolf Pack Targeted For Death..

September 22, 2012

“State hunters are ramping up their efforts to kill wolves in northern Stevens County, and now don’t plan to stop until they’ve killed off the Wedge Pack.

“The attempt now is to remove the entire pack,” said WDFW wolf policy coordinator Steve Pozzanghera this morning.

The agency is loading up its toolbox for the effort to take out the eight to 11 members of the livestock-depredating group, including tasking more marksmen, trappers and biologists to the area; hunting over not only calf carcasses but roadkilled deer; hunting at all hours with a fuller array of weaponery; bringing in USDA Wildlife Services for “technical assistance” on snaring; and possibly bringing local law enforcement into the hunt.

“If we’re unsuccessful, we will consider aerial gunning,” Pozzanghera adds”



Photo: Wisconsin DNR

Posted in: gray wolves, Wolf Wars

Tags: Wolf persecution, demonizing wolves, non-predation cattle losses,  poor animal husbandry practices, get cows off public land, Wedge Pack, WDFW


Sorry For My Absence…

OR7 yearling pups ODFW

Update: September 7, 2015

Thanks so much everyone for the get well wishes! Your kind words boosted my spirits <3

I would have liked to answer each one of you individually but since I’m one-finger-typing it’s easier to give a singular shout out to y’all :)

Many howls,



By now I’m sure you’re wondering why I haven’t been posting. It’s not because I’ve given up on wolf advocacy but I broke my dominant hand and can only type with one finger, VERY SLOWLY.  Already this post has taken me awhile to type. So forgive me but I will be back as soon as my hand heals. For now I’ll have to keep my posts short or reblog posts from some of the excellent sites like Exposing the Big Game.

For the wolves, For the wild ones,

Nabeki <3


Photo: Courtesy ODFW


Published in: on September 5, 2015 at 2:07 pm  Comments (29)  

Facebook deletes photos of slain rhinos, leopards and lions killed by Texas cheerleader after outcry



Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:


  • Kendall Jones, 19, has drawn the ire of thousands with her Facebook photos showing her smiling alongside rare African beasts
  • But Facebook has now removed her images of dead elephants, hippos and lions, among others, because they violate their standards
  • The website removes ‘reported content that promotes poaching of endangered species’, Facebook said in a statement
  • Jones, a cheerleader at Texas Tech who is gunning for a reality show, claims her hunting is actually a conservation effort

Facebook has deleted trophy photos showing rhinos, elephants, lions and leopards killed or tranquilized by a Texas Tech cheerleader.

Kendall Jones, 19, has sparked outrage across the social media site for sharing images of herself with the big game she has hunted through Africa.

On Thursday, Facebook removed some of the images that violated their standards.

In a statement, it…

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Published in: on September 1, 2015 at 10:30 pm  Comments (6)  

Speak For Wolves 2015 – Come Join Us!

Speak for Wolves 2nd annual Aug 2015

We hope you can join us on August 7-9, 2015 at the historic Union Pacific Dining Lodge in West Yellowstone, Montana for Speak for Wolves!

Friday August 7

6:00pm doors open with music by Neil Haverstick.

7:00pm Screening of OR-7 the Journey with filmmaker Clemens Schenk. Amaroq Weiss of the Center for Biological Diversity will be part of the Q&A session following the film. Tickets cost $10 and can be bought online at http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/1634194

They can also be purchased at the door-cash only.
Saturday August 8

11:30am doors open.

12:00pm opening remarks.

12:30pm Kim Wheeler, Executive Director of the Red Wolf Coalition, will discuss the plight of red wolves and the USFWS Red Wolf Recovery Program.

2:00pm activist Oliver Starr will discuss the reasons for the sharp decline in gray wolf populations in Denali National Park in Alaska and offer remedies.

3:00pm Brian Ertz, founder and Board President of Wildlands Defense, will discuss the failure of the controversial McKittrick Policy and why it needs to be reformed.


6:30pm doors open with live music by Matt Stone.

7:00pm Camilla Fox, founder and Executive Director of Project Coyote, will discuss current efforts to end wildlife killing contests on public and private lands.

A panel discussion will follow with Amaroq Weiss, West Coast Wolf Organizer of the Center for Biological Diversity, Kevin Bixby, founder and Executive Director of the Southwest Environmental Center, and author/ecologist George Wuerthner.

The entire program on Saturday is free.

Sunday August 9

9:00am doors open with music by Goodshield Aguilar.

9:30am Mike Mease, co-founder and Board President of Buffalo Field Campaign, will discuss the continued hazing and slaughter of wild buffalo in/around Yellowstone National Park and efforts to list the species under the Endangered Species Act.

10:30am Louisa Willcox, wildlife advocate and long-time conservationist, will discuss the government’s ill-conceived push to remove federal protections for grizzly bears and examine the role that states play in wildlife management.

11:15am Interpretive dance by choreographer MaryLee Sanders.

11:30am Inspirational talk by Jimmy St. Goddard of Blackfeet Nation.

12:00pm closing remarks.

The entire program on Sunday is free.

To learn more visit www.speakforwolves.org

O6 Female CC BY 2.0 Flickr

Remembering Yellowstone’s O6 Female 

Echo’s Killer Won’t Be Charged – The Feds Let Him Off On The “Coyote Excuse”

Echo NPS


Shock, shock! Once again the “coyote excuse” is used by a trophy hunter to dodge any charges for killing an endangered wolf. The Utah hunter who senselessly gunned down Echo won’t be held accountable for her death because according to the USFWS:

 “We didn’t find anything to refute the hunter’s statement,” Rolince said. 

Prosecutors tasked with making the final decision didn’t have evidence to prove the hunter knew he was shooting a wolf, meaning they fell short of reaching the burden created by the long-standing McKittrick policy, said U.S. attorney’s office spokeswoman Melodie Rydalch.

Under that policy, hunters who kill wolves get off unless authorities can prove they knew they were shooting a wolf.

So let me get this straight, the USFWS will not hold this person accountable for killing an endangered wolf because they can’t prove he didn’t know it was a coyote? Are they freaking kidding me? How many times will the “coyote excuse” be used to kill endangered wolves? There is no way to tell if a person is lying about this. Of course he’s going to try to save his own skin by saying  he didn’t know it was a wolf.  The “coyote excuse” is used all the time.

This coyote killing hunter didn’t just kill any wolf but the first wolf to disperse to the Grand Canyon in 70 years. This wolf didn’t belong to him. This hunter robbed the American people, he seemed to think it was his right to kill. And I don’t believe for one second he didn’t know it was a wolf. Wolves are distinctive, they’re large and tall, easily distinguishable from coyotes. And BTW, it’s not OK to kill coyotes either.

How about this USFWS, if anyone shoots an endangered wolf they get jail time period! Forget the excuses!

This is why the USFWS wants to delist wolves nationally, so hunters can shoot any wolf, anytime, anywhere. This will stop wolf recovery in its tracks. Exactly what the USFWS and Obama administration wants.

Echo was special, she traveled hundreds of miles to reach the Grand Canyon, searching for a mate and was murdered by a trophy hunter.

The USFWS is a joke when it comes to wolves. They’ve done almost nothing to protect them. A complete disgrace.


Hunter who killed wolf seen at Grand Canyon won’t be charged

SALT LAKE CITY — A Utah hunter who killed the first gray wolf seen near the Grand Canyon in seven decades won’t face criminal charges because he thought he was shooting a coyote, U.S. Fish and Wildlife announced Thursday.

The federal agency’s investigation concluded the hunter didn’t intentionally shoot the wolf, which is protected in Utah under the Endangered Species Act. The man, whose name was not released, realized his mistake after he saw the dead animal and immediately reported it to authorities, according to a news release. In Utah, anybody can hunt coyotes.

The 3-year-old female wolf — named “Echo” in a nationwide student contest — captured the attention of wildlife advocates across the county because it was so rare to see the animal near the Grand Canyon.

The wolf was shot in December in southern Utah. The Fish and Wildlife Service did DNA tests to confirm the wolf was the one seen roaming near the Grand Canyon’s North Rim and nearby forest earlier that year.

Fish and Wildlife officials said in the release that the case is a good reminder that all hunters should “identify their target before pulling the trigger.”

Investigators spoke with a hunter the man was with, reviewed other records and went in with their “eyes wide open” to make sure the man was being honest in saying he didn’t know it was a wolf, said Dan Rolince, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service assistant special agent in charge of law enforcement for the region.

“We didn’t find anything to refute the hunter’s statement,” Rolince said.

Prosecutors tasked with making the final decision didn’t have evidence to prove the hunter knew he was shooting a wolf, meaning they fell short of reaching the burden created by the long-standing McKittrick policy, said U.S. attorney’s office spokeswoman Melodie Rydalch.

Under that policy, hunters who kill wolves get off unless authorities can prove they knew they were shooting a wolf.

That makes the burden of proof too high and undercuts the protections of the Endangered Species Act, said Michael Robinson with the Center for Biological Diversity. He is one of many wildlife advocates who called the wolf’s death heartbreaking and said they wanted the hunter prosecuted. They said the animal could have helped wolves naturally recover in remote regions of Utah and neighboring states.

Robinson argues the policy should be changed.

“You can get a ‘Get out of jail free card’ by saying the magic words,” Robinson said. “Those are: ‘I thought it was coyote.'”

Robinson also laid blame on Utah state officials for not doing more to inform the public that the wolf may be roaming through the state.

State officials have said they are planning to address that by teaching hunters how to tell the difference between a wolf and a coyote during an orientation for a county program that offers people $50 per coyote. The man who shot this wolf was not registered for the program, officials said.

The wolf had worn a radio collar since January 2014.



Killing Echo: The “Mistaken Identity” Excuse, Part One

February 27, 2015



Killing Echo/Killing Wolves: – “Mistaken Identity and Other Excuses: Part Two

March 4, 2015



Photo: Courtesy NPS

Posted in: gray wolf, Wolf Wars

Tags: USFWS fails Echo, “coyote excuse”, no punishment for killing Echo, Grand Canyon, senseless slaughter, Utah trophy hunter


OR7 and Mate Raising New Pups!

OR7 and mate Rogue Pack USFWS

Iconic wolf OR7 and his mate are believed to be rearing their second set of puppies. So good to see this little family thriving when there is so much bad news in the wolf world. Many howls and love to you Journey!


New Year Brings New Pups To OR-7 Wolf Pack

Oregon’s wandering wolf’s lonely days are far behind after biologists found evidence that OR-7’s Rogue Pack has expanded by a second set of pups.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife released a video from trail cameras Tuesday that shows the new wolves playing in the Cascades east of Medford, which ODFW shared on its Oregon Wildlife Viewing Facebook page.

Read More


OR7 yearling pups ODFW

OR7 yearling pup!  Hey looks like Mrs. Journey <3


Photo: Courtesy USFWS

Posted in: gray wolf, biodiversity, OR7

Tags: OR7, Rogue Pack, evidence of new pups

Published in: on July 9, 2015 at 11:31 am  Comments (11)  

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