Native Americans Fight Against Delisting The Yellowstone Grizzly Bear

Female Grizzly Eating Grass

Female Grizzly Eating Grass Yellowstone National Park USFWS

We all knew it was coming. The USFWS wants to delist the Yellowstone grizzly bear. But they’ll have a fight on their hands because Native Americans are pushing back. I wish they’d taken a stand for wolves but at least they’re coming together for the Great Bear.


Native Americans Fight to Keep the Grizzly Bear on the Endangered Species List

grizzlybear_Jim Urquhart_Reuters

Grizzly Bear – Photo Jim Urquhart/Reuters

By John R. Platt

OCT 27, 2015

Tribal groups say a move to remove protections for the spiritual touchstone of native culture threatens their sovereignty.

Has the grizzly bear recovered enough in Yellowstone National Park to be removed from the protection of the Endangered Species Act?

The federal government and some state agencies seem to think so. For more than a year now, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service has been moving toward delisting grizzly bears. There are about 750 bears living in and around Yellowstone, well above the 136 that lived there when the government protected the Yellowstone population in 1975.

Native American groups, however, argue that the bears have not recovered and that any proposal to remove protections or trophy-hunt the animals ignores tribal sovereignty and culture. Some tribes even call it cultural genocide.

“The grizzly was and remains the physical manifestation of the spirit of the earth, to me, and many others,” said R. Bear Stands Last, cofounder of Guardians of Our Ancestors’ Legacy, a coalition of nearly 50 tribes from six states that have come together to oppose the grizzly bear delisting.

The bears play an important role in the culture for many tribes in the West. “The grizzly was the first two-legged to walk upon this land,” Bear Stands Last said. “The grizzly is a teacher and was, in essence, the first medicine person who taught the curing and healing practices adopted by many peoples.”

Even with that cultural history, the push to delist the bears moves forward. The FWS has sent out two rounds of letters to several tribes, but GOAL said that does not meet the standards for the tribal consultationsthat are required under the Endangered Species Act and other laws. Last December, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe passed a formal resolution opposing the delisting proposal.

“FWS has made no serious attempt to adhere to the established consultation protocols and mandates, all of which are clearly established and are integral to the trust responsibility held by the federal government toward tribal nations,” said Bear Stands Last.

Agency spokesperson Ryan Moehring said the FWS has offered to consult with 48 tribes and has held five government-to-government meetings. It also plans a tribal webinar and conference call on Nov. 13 to “listen to their concerns and answer questions.”

Grizzlies did briefly lose their endangered species status in 2007, but a court ruling in 2009 returned it after finding that the bears’ food sources, such as whitebark pine nuts, were at risk. Bear Stands Last said nothing has improved in Yellowstone.

“It is not only the decimation of whitebark pine and cutthroat trout; there are also various berry subsets declining due to climate change,” he said, noting that pushes grizzlies further outside the park in search of food, which puts them in further conflict with humans.



Photo: USFWS

Posted in: grizzly bear, endangered species

Top Photo: Courtesy USFWS

Middle Photo: Courtesy (Photo: Jim Urquhart/Reuters)

Tags: Native Americans, Yellowstone grizzly, stop the delisting, USFWS

ACTION ALERT: Wild Horses Sent To Brutal Mexican Slaughterhouses….

wild horses wallpapers_blogspotdotcom

Wild horses are being slaughtered under BLM management. The BLM sold 1795 wild horses to a known kill buyer by the name of Tom Davis, who BTW has ties to ex Interior Secretary Ken Salazar. Remember him, he and Obama delisted wolves in Montana and Idaho in 2009.

Davis admitted that most of the wild horses he purchased from the BLM were sent to Mexican slaughterhouses, which are incredibly brutal.


Horse Slaughter In Mexico

This is the agency we’ve entrusted the care of our “supposedly protected” wild horses to. Many wild horses have blood lines dating back to Cortez, now lost forever.

For anyone who has ever owned horses you know they have a prey animal mentality. Their natural instinct is to flee danger. Can you imagine the fear and suffering these animals experienced as they were led to their deaths, having their throats slit in a savage way. It makes me physically ill to even think about it.

This kill buyer should be prosecuted. Why is he still walking around with no charges brought against him? Why is the BLM getting away with their egregious negligence? They should NOT be managing the nation’s wild horses, it’s obvious they could care less about them.

Action needs to be taken! Wild horse numbers are dwindling fast. They are continually rounded up and sent to BLM holding facilities, where many languish. But in this case their home was a Mexican slaughterhouse.

Wild horses should be running free, that was the purpose of the Wild and Free Roaming Horses and Burro Act

“The act provides specific protections to “all unbranded and unclaimed horses and burros on public lands of the United States,”[2] and makes it a crime for anyone to harass or kill these animals on federal land. It requires the departments of the Interior and Agriculture to protect the animals.”

There are almost a 100 million cattle in this country, trampling all over our public and private lands. Yet there is no room for a few thousand wild horses?

Please contact the BLM and let them know what you think about their negligence. These horses belong to all Americans. We are their only voice. Please take action.


BLM Washington Office
1849 C Street NW, Rm. 5665
Washington DC 20240
Phone: 202-208-3801
Fax: 202-208-5242

Director: Neil Kornze
Deputy Director (Operations): Steven A. Ellis
Deputy Director (Policy): Linda Lance
Chief of Staff: Jon Raby (Acting)


Washington, DC contact


BLM Colorado 

Front Range District Office

3028 East Main Street
Cañon City, Colorado 81212
FAX 719-269-8599
District Manager: Tom Heinlein


BLM illegally sold thousands of wild horses for slaughter: report

– The Washington Times – Saturday, October 24, 2015

The Bureau of Land Management, the agency tasked with protecting wild horses and cattle and their grazing lands, sold 1,794 federally-protected wild horses to a Colorado rancher who sent them to slaughter, a new report confirmed. 

Between 2009 and 2012, rancher Tom Davis purchased the horses through the agency’s Wild Horse and Burro Program (WH&B) and wrongfully sent them to slaughter, according to the report from the Interior Department’s Office of Inspector General. According to the allegations and news reports, Mr. Davis also had farming and trucking connections with former Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar. 

 “We determined that BLM did not follow current law while managing WH&B. BLM also failed to follow its own policy of limiting horse sales and ensuring that the horses sold went to good homes and were not slaughtered,” investigators wrote in the report. 

Mr. Davis admitted that most of the horses that he purchased through the BLM went to slaughter.

He told investigators that “in selling so many loads of horses, BLM had to know that the horses would end up at the slaughterhouse.” 

The wrongful sale also cost taxpayers $140,000 to deliver truckloads of horses to Mr. Davis. He paid $10 a piece for the horses, or less than $18,000 total, and made as much as $154,000 in profits by selling them for slaughter, according to the report. 

BLM employees never attempted to verify the information that Mr. Davis provided regarding his intentions for the horses he bought, despite the unusually large number of horses being sold to him, investigators wrote. The agency also did not stop selling horses to Mr. Davis after receiving reports that he was sending the horses to slaughter. 

The OIG declined to investigate Mr. Davis‘ ties to Mr. Salazar.

The investigation was referred to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Colorado as well as the State of Colorado Conejos County District Attorney’s Office, which declined civil and criminal prosecution, according to the report.

“It took more than three years for the OIG to confirm what we’ve always known – that the BLM sold 1,795 federally-protected wild horses to a known kill buyer who sold them to slaughter,” said Suzanne Roy, Director of the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign (AWHPC). “Unfortunately, there will be no justice for these mustangs, who suffered a brutal death in Mexican slaughter plants. No one at the BLM is being held accountable for this betrayal, and Tom Davis is not being prosecuted for violating his contractual obligation to not sell the horses for slaughter.”

In their response to the report, BLM officials said they are taking the matter very seriously and have taken preventative measures to ensure horses sold by the agency do not end up at slaughterhouses in the future.

BLM officials also said that the agency no longer has any business relationship with Mr. Davis and will not in the future.


After Wild Horse Report, Jewell Faces First Moment of Truth at Interior

A new federal report blasts the Bureau of Land Management for its wild horse policies– putting the new Interior Secretary squarely between science and politics.

June 7, 2013

Wild horses are rounded up by the Bureau of Land Management in the West Desert of Utah in 2012 Jim Urquhart Reuters

“Wild horses are rounded up by the Bureau of Land Management in the West Desert of Utah in 2012. (Jim Urquhart/Reuters)

At the heart of the current debate over the nation’s wild horses is the BLM policy (encouraged and enhanced by Jewell’s predecessor Ken Salazar) of removing horses from their native rangelands out West and warehousing them in enclosures in the Midwest. Tens of thousands of wild horses now are so kept, at great taxpayer expense, while federal officials figure out what to do with them. For years, the BLM has justified these removals, many of which are dangerous to the horses, by claiming they are necessary to protect grazing lands for “multiple uses,” which really means livestock grazing and energy exploration.

The NAS Report took a dim view of the science behind this policy. The BLM’s “current practice of removing free-ranging horses from public lands promotes a high population growth rate,” the report concluded, “and maintaining them in long-term holding facilities is both economically unsustainable and incongruent with public expectations.” In other words, the scientists found that by removing so many wild horses from our lands the Interior Department was doing the opposite of what it was trying to do — decreasing population rates among the herds — and doing it without adequate scientific reason.

Nokota_mares_wiki_François Marchal

 Top photo: Courtesy wild horse wallpaper blogspotdotdom

Middle Photo: Courtesy Wiki

Bottom Photo: Courtesy wild horse wallpapers

Posted in: Wild Horses, Animal Cruelty, Action Alert

Tags: Wild horses slaughtered, BLM negligence, Tom Davis, Mexican slaughterhouses, Colorado, accountability

wild horses wallpapers_mother and foal

Hunters shoot two elk – then realise they were firing through fence into zoo


Scandinavia is earning quite the reputation, first in Denmark Marius the giraffe is killed and dissected at the Copenhagen zoo in front of school children, then Denmark’s Odense Zoo does the same thing with a nine month old male lion, dissecting and pulling out his organs in front of kids in a disgusting display, and now these idiots in Norway shoot zoo animals!

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:

1610111_10152194241138908_1599987755_n “A group of hunters in Norway have shot dead two elk – before
realising seconds later they were firing through a fence into the
animal’s enclosure in a zoo.”

View original

Published in: on October 20, 2015 at 12:45 pm  Comments (14)  

“It’s Survival of the Weak and Scrawny”….

“A victim of trophy hunters.”

A German Hunter Killed One of Africa’s Biggest Elephants

Conservation groups in Zimbabwe aim to find the identity of the hunter to give him the ‘Cecil the lion’ treatment.

Germna trophy hunter kills one of Africa's biggest elephants Yahoo news

October 16, 2015

By Taylor Hill

“Associate editor at TakePart covering environment and wildlife.”

A German trophy hunter reportedly shot and killed one of the largest elephants recorded in nearly 30 years, and now a Zimbabwean conservation group wants to make him infamous, like the killer of Cecil the lion.

The 40- to 60-year-old elephant was shot just outside Zimbabwe’s Gonarezhou National Park and had tusks weighing more than 100 pounds each, Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force chairperson Johnny Rodrigues said in a statement.

“His tusks were so big that they dragged along the ground when he was walking,” Rodrigues said. This elephant was unknown to wildlife rangers at the park and might have wandered across the border from South Africa into Zimbabwe, where the unidentified hunter shot and killed it.

According to The Telegraph, the hunting organization that led the guided hunt has refused to name the hunter, who paid $61,000 to participate in a 21-day excursion that ended Oct. 8 with one dead elephant. But Rodrigues said the conservation group is going to find out the hunter’s identity.

“The authorities and the hunters’ association are trying to protect him, but we’ve got his photograph,” Rodrigues told The Guardian.



  In light of this egregious killing of one of Africa’s largest elephants, by a German trophy hunter,  it seemed fitting to repost a piece I did back in 2012 that examines how hunting may be altering and weakening species. Hunters with “tiny ego’s” have a penchant for killing the biggest and fittest animals, leaving smaller, weaker animals to breed.  A form of reverse evolution.


June 26, 2012

It turns out hunting animals may be more harmful than we thought,  especially trophy hunting.  It could be causing a kind of backward evolution, because the largest and most impressive animals, “prized” by hunters, are diminishing in some species, leading to a reduction in  size and other disturbing changes in the remaining animals.  In other words, the more robust members of certain species are disappearing, not by the process of “natural selection” but by hunting pressure. It’s as if hunters are selectively breeding animals in the wild by killing off the “trophy” animals, leaving the smaller and weaker individuals to breed.

Big horned sheep rams in Alberta, Canada have experienced a 25% decrease in horn size over the last thirty years. Being larger, with huge horns makes them a target for trophy hunters. It then follows the smaller sheep with less impressive horns, have more mating chances.

“Hunters frequently compare their role in the ecosystem to that of natural predators, some of which are disappearing throughout the world. The problem with that analogy is that, unlike hunters, natural predators target the small, the weak, and the sick. Hunters, on the other hand, tend to target the largest, strongest individuals with the largest hides, horns, tusks or antlers.”

It’s not just Big Horned sheep, elephants are also changing.

“Tusks used to make elephants fitter, as a weapon or a tool in foraging—until ivory became a precious commodity and having tusks got you killed. Then tuskless elephants, products of a genetic fluke, became the more consistent breeders and grew from around 2 percent among African elephants to more than 38 percent in one Zambian population, and 98 percent in a South African one. In Asia, where female elephants don’t have tusks to begin with, the proportion of tuskless elephants has more than doubled, to more than 90 percent in Sri Lanka. But there’s a cost to not having tusks. Tusked elephants, like the old dominant males on Ram Mountain, were “genetically ‘better’ individuals,” says Festa-Bianchet. “When you take them systematically out of the population for several years, you end up leaving essentially a bunch of losers doing the breeding.”

The effects that are taking place are difficult to link solely to hunting pressure @ this early stage because evolutionary changes happen so slowly but it doesn’t take a rocket scientist or hundreds of years of evolution to observe what’s happening.  Trophy hunters target the “biggest and the best”, therefore there are fewer of these alpha animals to pass on their genetics.

 The solution is to err on the side of caution and ban trophy hunting entirely. It’s a cruel and heartless enterprise, there would be no down side to freeing animals from this torture.  It doesn’t belong in a civilized society and should  be eliminated for purely ethical reasons BUT if it’s actually upsetting the natural process and weakening animal species, then all the more reason to rid the world of it.

A 2009 Newsweek article explains it all. Hunters not only don’t play the same positive  role as apex predators, like the wolf and grizzly bear but may be the cause of a deadly reverse evolution.

How Hunting is Driving “Evolution in Reverse.”


It’s Survival of the Weak and Scrawny

Jan 2, 2009 7:00 PM EST

Researchers see ‘evolution in reverse’ as hunters kill off prized animals with the biggest antlers and pelts.

Some of the most iconic photographs of Teddy Roosevelt, one of the first conservationists in American politics, show the president posing companionably with the prizes of his trophy hunts. An elephant felled in Africa in 1909 points its tusks skyward; a Cape buffalo, crowned with horns in the shape of a handlebar mustache, slumps in a Kenyan swamp. In North America, he stalked deer, pronghorn antelope, bighorn sheep and elk, which he called “lordly game” for their majestic antlers. What’s remarkable about these photographs is not that they depict a hunter who was also naturalist John Muir’s staunchest political ally. It’s that just 100 years after his expeditions, many of the kind of magnificent trophies he routinely captured are becoming rare.

Elk still range across parts of North America, but every hunting season brings a greater challenge to find the sought-after bull with a towering spread of antlers. Africa and Asia still have elephants, but Roosevelt would have regarded most of them as freaks, because they don’t have tusks. Researchers describe what’s happening as none other than the selection process that Darwin made famous: the fittest of a species survive to reproduce and pass along their traits to succeeding generations, while the traits of the unfit gradually disappear. Selective hunting—picking out individuals with the best horns or antlers, or the largest piece of hide—works in reverse: the evolutionary loser is not the small and defenseless, but the biggest and best-equipped to win mates or fend off attackers.

When hunting is severe enough to outstrip other threats to survival, the unsought, middling individuals make out better than the alpha animals, and the species changes. “Survival of the fittest” is still the rule, but the “fit” begin to look unlike what you might expect. And looks aren’t the only things changing: behavior adapts too, from how hunted animals act to how they reproduce. There’s nothing wrong with a species getting molded over time by new kinds of risk. But some experts believe problems arise when these changes make no evolutionary sense.

Ram Mountain in Alberta, Canada, is home to a population of bighorn sheep, whose most vulnerable individuals are males with thick, curving horns that give them a regal, Princess Leia look. In the course of 30 years of study, biologist Marco Festa-Bianchet of the University of Sherbrooke in Quebec found a roughly 25 percent decline in the size of these horns, and both male and female sheep getting smaller. There’s no mystery on Ram Mountain: male sheep with big horns tend to be larger and produce larger offspring. During the fall rut, or breeding season, these alpha rams mate more than any other males, by winning fights or thwarting other males’ access to their ewes. Their success, however, is contingent upon their surviving the two-month hunting season just before the rut, and in a strange way, they’re competing against their horns. Around the age of 4, their horn size makes them legal game—several years before their reproductive peak. That means smaller-horned males get far more opportunity to mate.

Other species are shrinking, too. Australia’s red kangaroo has become noticeably smaller as poachers target the largest animals for leather. The phenomenon has been most apparent in harvested fish: since fishing nets began capturing only fish of sufficient size in the 1980s, the Atlantic cod and salmon, several flounders and the northern pike have all propagated in miniature.

So what if fish or kangaroos are smaller? If being smaller is safer, this might be a successful adaptation for a hunted species. After all, ” ‘fitness’ is relative and transitory,” says Columbia University biologist Don Melnick, meaning that Darwinian natural selection has nothing to do with what’s good or bad, or the way things should be.

Read more:


“In the Shadows of the Congo Basin Forest, Elephants Fall to the Illegal Ivory Trade”


Top Photo: Christophe Morio/Africahunting
Middle Photo: (Facebook)
Bottom Photo: Wikimedia Commons
Posted in: Trophy Hunting
Tags: Hunting pressure, species evolution in reverse, smaller is not better, hunted animals, damage done by trophy hunting, Newsweek, Daily Beast, takepart

Wolves Flourish Where Humans Fear To Tread…

Chernobyl wolf Sergey Gashchak_Chornobyl Center

“A European gray wolf on the Ukrainian side of the Chernobyl exclusion zone.” Sergey Gashchak/Chornobyl Center

Chernobyl, one of the greatest disasters of the modern age, has turned into a haven for wildlife in just thirty years. How ironic, that a place uninhabited for decades, due to a catastrophic radiation spill at a Ukrainian power plant (which was then part of the USSR), is now a flourishing wildlife refuge, particularly for wolves. The explanation: NO HUMANS!

“It’s very likely that wildlife numbers at Chernobyl are much higher than they were before the accident,” a researcher says in a release. “This doesn’t mean radiation is good for wildlife, just that the effects of human habitation, including hunting, farming, and forestry, are a lot worse.”


In the eerie emptiness of Chernobyl’s abandoned towns, wildlife is flourishing

The sound was like nothing Tom Hinton had ever heard before: a chorus of baleful wolf howls, long and loud and coming from seemingly every direction in the darkness. The predators yipped and chirped and crooned to one another for what seemed like forever, sending a shiver of awe and intuitive fear down Hinton’s spine.

“It was a primordial experience,” he said, something most of humanity hasn’t felt for tens of thousands of years. “That dates back to when humans were prey.”

It was only possible because of where Hinton was standing, a remote area along the Belarus-Ukraine border that’s been uninhabited by humans for decades.

They all left in the wake of a very different sound nearly 30 years earlier: the massive explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in 1986, which left dozens dead and drove more than 100,000 people from their homes across a 1,600-square-mile swath of Ukraine and Belarus. These days, abandoned apartment complexes are nothing more than crumbled concrete wrecks. Vines crawl up the decaying walls of old farmhouses and break unintended skylights into their roofs. No one lives in the post-apocalyptic setting.

No one human, that is. Wildlife populations there – shaggy-haired wild boar, long-legged elk, the howling choruses of wolves that so captivated Hinton last August – are flourishing.

“It shows I think that how much damage we do,” said fellow co-author Jim Smith, an environmental science professor at the University of Portsmouth. “It’s kind of obvious but our everyday activities associated with being in a place are what damages the environment.”

“Not that radiation isn’t bad,” he added, “but what people do when they’re there is so much worse.”

The study is the first real census of wild animals in the exclusion zone. It relies on a decades worth of helicopter observations in the years right after the disaster, and three winters of scientists carefully counting animal tracks on foot between 2008 and 2010 in the Belarusian section of the zone.

Though animal numbers were low when scientists first started counting them in 1987 (because no data was taken before the disaster, they can’t tell to what degree the populations were hurt by the explosion), they rapidly rose once humans left the region. Brown bears and rare European lynx – predatory cats the size of a Great Dane with tufted ears and glimmering gold eyes – quickly appeared in the forests, even though they hadn’t been seen for decades before the accident. Wild boar took up residence in abandoned buildings. Forests replaced humans in the villages’ empty streets.

Within 10 years, every animal population in the exclusion zone had at least doubled. At the same time, the kinds of species that were flourishing in the exclusion zone were vanishing from other parts of the former Soviet Union, likely due to increased hunting, poorer wildlife management and other economic changes.

By 2010, the last year of the on-foot census, the populations for most species were as large as in any of Belarus’ four national parks. For one species, the wolves, the population was seven times bigger.

This indicates to researchers that chronic exposure to radiation from the explosion has had no impact on overall mammal populations. Whatever fallout may have come from the initial explosion was completely offset by the benefits of life without humans.

This doesn’t mean that the zone isn’t dangerous, Hinton stressed. He and his colleagues didn’t study the individual- and molecular-level damage caused by lingering contamination. While whole populations aren’t dying out, individual animals might be getting sick. And surveys have shown that the soil in areas close to the reactor site still exude radiation.

But, “the environment is very resilient,” Hinton said.

The presence of wolves is particularly telling. As apex predators, they are a sign of the health of the entire ecosystem – if they’re flourishing, that means that every other level of species, from elk and deer on down to insects and plants, must also be healthy.

Another team of researchers is currently using camera traps to count wildlife on the Ukrainian side of the exclusion zone. Nick Beresford, a radioecologist at the National Environment Research Council in the UK, said that their work won’t be done until the end of the year, but he expects to reach the same conclusions as those working in Belarus.

Beresford praised the Current Biology study and its findings: “People have said before that wildlife in the zone is flourishing, but those accounts were rightly criticized as anecdotal,” he said. “This is the first study to really back it up with science.”

Walking around the exclusion zone is like being in “a national park without the people,” Hinton said. The forests are nearly pristine, the animals abundant. What relics of human presence do remain have been almost entirely reclaimed by nature.

Even the Soviet city of Pripyat in Ukraine, which once housed tens of thousands of workers at the Chernobyl plant, has been subsumed by trees.

“When I was there 15 years ago, it looked like a city with some trees growing in it,” recalled Smith. “Now it looks like a forest with some buildings in it.”

For Hinton, who is currently studying the effects of the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan, the impact is both astounding and sobering.

“It’s an amazing experience from a wildlife perspective, but it’s also a sad experience because you see homes that have been abandoned and you imagine the people’s lives that have been disturbed,” he said. “It’s sad to see the houses and the cars and the baseball bats and you envision the life that people had to drop and leave. But you also see wild boar running around and you don’t see that as soon as you leave the zone.”


Wolves Have Taken Over Chernobyl


By Arden Dier,  Newser Staff

Posted Oct 6, 2015 7:32 AM CDT

Wolves Have Taken Over Chernobyl Valeriy Yurko/T.G. Deryabina

“Wolf populations are seven times greater near Chernobyl than in nearby uncontaminated nature reserves.   (Valeriy Yurko/T.G. Deryabina)”


Radioactive Wolves


Top Photo: Courtesy  Sergey Gashchak/Chornobyl Center

Bottom Photo: Courtesy Valeriy Yurko/T.G. Deryabina

Video: Courtesy Youtube

Posted in: gray wolf, biodiversity

Tags: Chernobyl, wolves flourish in Chernobyl, radiation, Ukraine, biodiversity

Montana Grizzly Bears Win Big In Court – Habitat Protected!

Earthjustice Grizzly Bear News

October 9, 2015

Missoula, MT —

Montana’s federal district court approved and adopted a settlement agreement today between conservationists and state officials that ensures long-term protection for more than 22,000 acres of important grizzly bear habitat on state forest lands near Whitefish, Montana.

The settlement represents an agreement between the conservation groups Friends of the Wild Swan, Montana Environmental Information Center, and Natural Resources Defense Council, represented by Earthjustice, with officials from the Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (“DNRC”) concerning management of grizzly bear habitat on the 90,500-acre Stillwater and Coal Creek state forests in northwest Montana. The settlement resolves a lawsuit that the conservation groups filed in March 2013 to challenge a government proposal to reduce grizzly bear habitat protections on the state forest lands.

Under the settlement, DNRC will designate seven grizzly bear security zones encompassing 22,007 acres within which:

• Motorized activities will be prohibited during spring, summer, and fall periods when grizzlies are actively using the landscape;

• No permanent road construction will be allowed; and

• Any temporary roads must be reclaimed to prevent use by vehicles, including off-road vehicles.

“This agreement ensures protection for the last, best grizzly bear habitat remaining on state lands in Montana,” said Earthjustice Attorney Timothy Preso, who represented the groups in negotiating the agreement.

“The agreement promises grizzly conservation for decades,” added Arlene Montgomery of Friends of the Wild Swan. “Even if the area’s grizzlies are someday removed from the protections of the Endangered Species Act, these protective measures will endure because they will be incorporated into the conservation strategy for long-term grizzly management.”

“The protected lands provide connectivity to neighboring national forest lands to maintain an unbroken habitat link for bears that move out from Glacier National Park,”said Kyla Maki of the Montana Environmental Information Center.

Matt Skoglund of the Natural Resources Defense Council added, “Under this agreement, the protected grizzly bear security zones include important habitat areas such as avalanche chutes where grizzly bears forage for the natural foods they need to survive.  Multiple generations of grizzlies will benefit from being able to utilize these habitat areas without disturbance.”

View the settlement agreement and the Court’s order.

grizzly cub and mom


 Top Photo: Courtesy Earthjustice

Bottom photo: grizzly bear wallpaper

Posted in: grizzly bears

Tags: grizzly habitat protected, 22,000 acres, Montana, Earthjustice

Published in: on October 14, 2015 at 11:28 am  Comments (9)  
Tags: , ,

For The Wolves……

gray wolf flickr commons usfws

December 15, 2012


Photo: USFWS Flickr Commons

Video: Courtesy YouTube

Posted in: Wolf Wars, Wolf Warriors

Tags: over 600 dead, wolf slaughter, fight back, get active, save America’s wolves

Remove hunters from conservation departments like USFWS.

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:

we petition the obama administration to:

Remove hunters from conservation departments like USFWS. More transparency in wildlife conservation through DOJ

Request the Department of Justice and Office of Inspector General to implement changes that bring transparency in wildlife conservation. Conservation organizations like USFWS are being used to further the interests of hunting groups.

This could be considered fraudulent use of taxpayer funds. Taxpayers assume that USFWS is protecting wildlife, not sustaining hunting.

Transparency measures are urgently required to purge hunters from conservation organizations funded by taxpayers.

Published Date: Sep 12, 2015

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Published in: on October 12, 2015 at 12:31 pm  Comments (10)  

More Animal Killing and Butchering at Heartless Denmark Zoos

Giraffe_publically_killed_and_chopped_at_the_Copenhagen_Zoo.jpg Wiki

Sweet Marius murdered and then butchered in front of school children at Copenhagen Zoo in February 2014

Remember when the Copenhagen zoo murdered poor 18 month old Marius the giraffe, because they determined he wasn’t genetically important to the gene pool? They lured that poor baby, who had trusted those zoo keepers all his life and killed him. Then to add insult to injury they dissected him in front of school children and fed his body parts to the lions. Are they disgusting human beings or what?

Now round two is about to happen in the Odense zoo in Denmark. They killed a lion about nine months ago, because according to them they had too many lions. Hey morons, find another home for the lion, don’t kill it. But no, they didn’t find a home for the lion, just like the Copenhagen zoo rejected all the offers from other organizations to take Marius and give him a home. So the Odense zoo is planning on dissecting this lion, whom they’ve kept frozen the past nine months and dissect it in front of school children. Lets’ forget the word dissect and just call it what it is, butchering.  Talk about  desensitising children to animal murder. They’re doing a wonderful job over there in Denmark. These people shouldn’t be running zoos. Those animals were entrusted to them to care for and yet they heartlessly murder them.

Boycott this zoo!!


Sweet doomed Marius: Reuters_keldnavntoft_scanpixdenmark

Marc Bekoff, Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, said:

“The cold justification for these killings offered by zoo workers chilled and scared me. Furthermore, these easily avoidable deaths, perversely justified “in the name of conservation,” are horrible lessons for youngsters and run counter to global programs in humane education and compassionate conservation.”


Danish zoo to dissect lion in front of children ‘for education’

A lion at Odense Zoo Flickr Martin Borjesson

A Lion At Odense Zoo in Denmark


Top photo: AFP Photo/Kasper Palsnov

Middle Photo: Reuters_keldnavntoft_scanpixdenmark

Bottom Photo: Flickr: Martin Borjesson

Posted in: Animal Cruelty

Tags: Odense Zoo, Denmark, boycott Odense Zoo, animal cruelty, animal murder, heartless, polluting children’s minds, butchering zoo animals

“For the animal shall not be measured by man…Henry Beston


“We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals. Remote from universal nature and living by complicated artifice, man in civilization surveys the creature through the glass of his knowledge and sees thereby a feather magnified and the whole image in distortion. We patronize them for their incompleteness, for their tragic fate for having taken form so far below ourselves. And therein do we err. For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours, they move finished and complete, gifted with the extension of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear. They are not brethren, they are not underlings: they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth.”

Henry Beston 1925

Wolf_All Life Matters pinterest


Bottom Photo: Courtesy Pinterest

Posted in: Biodiversity

Tags: Animal lives matter, biodiversity, Henry Beston

Published in: on October 5, 2015 at 6:49 pm  Comments (20)  
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